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What shaving soap will still be around a hundred years from now?

Rudy Vey

Contributor
Vendor
Rudy's probably right on .. witness St Charles Shave recently

Tabac, Harris ..
Yes, this was sad to see St Charles go....Sue was one of the first artisan soap makers, and Wendy her daughter carried it on. But knowing Wendy, she may be showing up again one day.
 
Id say that the non-artisan soaps will still be around like Arko, Speick and Tabac. Most, if not all of the artisans probably wont be around though because they all will retire and unless their kids decide to carry on soap making, they wont be around.
Really, its OK though. In the short time that Ive been wet shaving (4 years), Ive seen artisans come and go and shaving still rolls on.
 
I'm going to go with Arko. After the inevitable nuclear holocaust, the cockroaches will be eating twinkies and shaving with Arko.
And then some of the cockroaches will be saying the lather with Arko has great cushion, and other cockroaches will refuse to use it down to it's scent.

They won't be able to write on forums about their experiences though.
 
Two things a lot of us shaving snobs like to forget about are:

1- hard water is a reality a lot of people have to deal with, and a few staple soaps like Haslinger do it better than any artisan soaps.

2- Arko. The tubs will come and go ~13 more times over the next 100 years, but that lathered man will be smiling up at us from foil wrappers forever.

Also Nobody said Mitchell’s wool fat? I’ve never used the stuff, but the claim to fame is an unchanged formula since 1897 and many people still insist it’s the best post-shave in the game.
 

DEPenguin

Contributor
This is an interesting question. If we consider history we know shaving has been around since very early antiquity, clamshells or sharpened stones and bones--to we modern gents that's barbaric, but then at some point we used leaves or straw (or worse) to wipe with . . . you work with what you have.

Yes, some cultures utterly eschew shaving opting for the lengthy, plentiful beard. Not my thing, but I'm American, a product of relatively young Westernization and consumerism. Drives me nuts to see athletes sporting ridiculously huge beards--again, I know it's a personal thing, just makes me crazy. And again, that's my cultural prism my perspective is filtered through.

But plenty of cultures (I would suppose mostly Western) have long favored shaving as part of being 'civilized'. Our hard wired desire for some kind of grooming leads me to believe shaving itself won't disappear until humnas do, and at our current rate that might not take but a few more centuries. IF that's the case, all those folks will still require some kind of lather to accomplish the task, unless they choose to chemically burn it off, or the aforementioned gene editing. But where's the fun in that?

I concur with the general consensus that artisans will likely ebb and flow, appear and disappear, but we will always find something new, perhaps something truly innovative and exciting on the horizon.
 
Toothpick is probably right. Just like we no longer use ice boxes (except the small coolers we take to picnics and tailgate parties), rotary dial telephones and many other inventions of the 19th and early 20th centuries, in the next 100 year shaving is likely to go one of two directions. One direction might be to forego shaving all together and grow beards as some cultures have done. The other may be the permanent removal of all facial hair so shaving is unnecessary.
Historically, shaving has always gone in and out of fashion. I don't see any reason to believe that it won't continue to flip-flop, 100 years from now. In the grand scheme of things, human evolution seems to be favoring a decreasing amount of body hair, so my guess is that facial hair will disappear altogether, at some point. (That is, if humanity doesn't wipe itself out first, which is the outcome that I'm betting my money on.)
 
martin de candre, haslinger.

They are good, and cover the low and high end market segments. The haslinger brand has survived the longest, but is the current version just like it was in 1897? doubtful. Is it as good? unknown unless they make a batch of the original recipe.

MDC,,,, seems better and better the more I read about it. Sure no tallow, so the muslims will be happy happy about it. But otherwise the longevity is key. So is the exclusivity implied by its history and production
 
martin de candre, haslinger.

They are good, and cover the low and high end market segments. The haslinger brand has survived the longest, but is the current version just like it was in 1897? doubtful. Is it as good? unknown unless they make a batch of the original recipe.

MDC,,,, seems better and better the more I read about it. Sure no tallow, so the muslims will be happy happy about it. But otherwise the longevity is key. So is the exclusivity implied by its history and production

It's funny that you mentioned Martin de Candre as I recently had gone back to it. I had purchased it a while ago tried it for a bit, then went on to others that I had. Just experimenting on what I had accumulated to that point.


I saw the MDC sitting in a corner and decided to use it. It was slick and worked very well.

The thing about it though was how little was required on my brush to making great lather. As I remember, it was a bit expensive but for how little is required and how long the jar would last it seems a good buy as it also works great!

Mike
 
martin de candre, haslinger.

They are good, and cover the low and high end market segments. The haslinger brand has survived the longest, but is the current version just like it was in 1897? doubtful. Is it as good? unknown unless they make a batch of the original recipe.

MDC,,,, seems better and better the more I read about it. Sure no tallow, so the muslims will be happy happy about it. But otherwise the longevity is key. So is the exclusivity implied by its history and production

I have never used the tallow version of Haslinger. The new formula is vegetable based. I rank the performance as OK, but no better. The slickness is excellent but it could use more cushion/protection and postshave is lacking. Since the formula changed recently, I doubt it will be around another 100 years.
 
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