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What shaving soap will still be around a hundred years from now?

A recent thread,

Started With 30+ and Now I Have 8 (Shave Soaps),

brought an interesting question to my mind that I don't know if it had been brought up yet?

Anyway, I will throw this out:

With all the many relatively new shave soaps and such, what will still be in use a hundred years from now?

Will it be the just few old standards that have already stood the test of time and has been around for so long?

Quite possibly yes, but the question is, how many of the new ones will make the cut and will still be around a hundred years from now?

Mike
 

Hannah's Dad

Contributor
My guess would be an artisan who exhibits as much business acumen as great soap. None of the current artisans themselves will be alive in 100 years; if the business survives, so will their recipes and soap. I’ll put my chips on Stirling and B&M.
 
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Rudy Vey

Contributor
Vendor
Pretty much the same that are now are available - non-artisan soaps - like Tabac, DR Harris, Trumper, Penhaligons etc etc....and Arko...
I doubt any of the artisan soaps of today will be still around. A lot of these classic companies not only make shaving soaps, but often the whole product range of cosmetics, scents etc
 
Much as it pains me to say it, Arko, Cella, Tabac....

However, since these are such foul smelling products there will always be better artisans available, just not the same ones.
 

Toothpick

Moderator
I agree with Rudy. No current artisans will be around 100 years from now. Best they can hope for is to pass along the business to their children. Or sell it to someone that will carry on. For most it’s a hobby they make a little money on. And when the market dries up so will they. I highly doubt any artisans are setting up a sweet retirement fund. Or much less thinking of the business 100 years from now. Actually, probably a handful are actually doing well enough to truly live of the business. And I mean a literal handful. 5-10 maybe.

Business is jamming now. Plenty of customers. But 100 years from now? I doubt we’ll even be lathering soap by then. Probably all getting our hair laser removed. Or editing genes to not grow hair.
 
Haslinger has been around since the mid-1800s, so I expect that they can last another 100 years. Other candidates: Arko, Williams, Tabac...
 
Pretty much the same that are now are available - non-artisan soaps - like Tabac, DR Harris, Trumper, Penhaligons etc etc....
I'd bet anything those three will stop making their own soaps and switch to generic (junk) formulas like the other british companies have

My guess would be an artisan who exhibits as much business acumen as great soap. None of the current artisans themselves will be alive in 100 years; if the business survives, so will their recipes and soap. I’ll put my chips on Stirling and B&M.
I'd also agree on those being the longest lasting artisans. Possible Razorock (though they don't make their own soap), Fine, and PAA
 
My guess would be an artisan who exhibits as much business acumen as great soap. None of the current artisans themselves will be alive in 100 years; if the business survives, so will their recipes and soap. I’ll put my chips on Stirling and B&M.
Besides the classics others mentioned (Tabac, DRH, etc.) Stirling was one that came to my mind too based on the size and success of their business. They've got body wash now and I know they are working on other fragrances and products (I think Rod said candles are in the works). I can foresee that operation surviving a long time either as a business within their family or being purchased by another individual or company.
 

Hannah's Dad

Contributor
Besides the classics others mentioned (Tabac, DRH, etc.) Stirling was one that came to my mind too based on the size and success of their business. They've got body wash now and I know they are working on other fragrances and products (I think Rod said candles are in the works). I can foresee that operation surviving a long time either as a business within their family or being purchased by another individual or company.
My thoughts exactly.
 
Business is jamming now. Plenty of customers. But 100 years from now? I doubt we’ll even be lathering soap by then. Probably all getting our hair laser removed. Or editing genes to not grow hair.

Never thought of that. Maybe something like taking a pill or something!
 

Dragonsbeard

Contributor
Proraso will probably be around as to many barbers use it and I'll bet some bigger company buys them out at some point.
 
I honestly can't picture a single brand staying in business that long. Most artisan brands these days last for 5-10 years at best, and the big name companies that have lasted 50-100 years will eventually crumble as the times change.
 
I'm going to go with Arko. After the inevitable nuclear holocaust, the cockroaches will be eating twinkies and shaving with Arko.
 
I agree with Rudy. No current artisans will be around 100 years from now. Best they can hope for is to pass along the business to their children. Or sell it to someone that will carry on. For most it’s a hobby they make a little money on. And when the market dries up so will they. I highly doubt any artisans are setting up a sweet retirement fund. Or much less thinking of the business 100 years from now. Actually, probably a handful are actually doing well enough to truly live of the business. And I mean a literal handful. 5-10 maybe.

Business is jamming now. Plenty of customers. But 100 years from now? I doubt we’ll even be lathering soap by then. Probably all getting our hair laser removed. Or editing genes to not grow hair.

Toothpick is probably right. Just like we no longer use ice boxes (except the small coolers we take to picnics and tailgate parties), rotary dial telephones and many other inventions of the 19th and early 20th centuries, in the next 100 year shaving is likely to go one of two directions. One direction might be to forego shaving all together and grow beards as some cultures have done. The other may be the permanent removal of all facial hair so shaving is unnecessary.
 
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