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What is your preferred roast of coffee?

I personally prefer the darkest roast coffee I can find. I have tried medium roast coffees but they lack that punch that it seems only a dark roast can provide. I don't think I have ever seen a light roast coffee now that I think of it. I prefer dark roast for my espresso, French press and drip coffee processes. How about you? What is your preferred level of roast?
 
Usually dark roast too. Sometimes a medium if its something local or interesting. Or 100 percent kona.
 
Light or medium roast. I used to enjoy the dark roast when there was a better roaster in the area.

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I personally prefer the darkest roast coffee I can find. I have tried medium roast coffees but they lack that punch that it seems only a dark roast can provide. I don't think I have ever seen a light roast coffee now that I think of it. I prefer dark roast for my espresso, French press and drip coffee processes. How about you? What is your preferred level of roast?
For me, dark roast beans taste bitter. I prefer a medium roast to let the flavor of the beans come through. Intelligentsia coffee, Black Cat Espresso whole beans are my favorite, followed by Lavazza.
 
I roast my own coffee so I roast each origin the way it wants to be roasted.

When I get a new batch of beans I will do a test roast, pulling a group of roasted beans from the machine every 30 seconds from just before first crack right up until the start of second crack.

I'll then grind and cup each group and decide where the flavor has reached its maximum.

From that point on, those beans get roasted to that point, regardless of what that point is.

This has always worked for me in determining how far to take a single origin coffee in the roaster.

Video is not me but this is how I determine where I will roast a coffee bean. It is rather long as it goes through the entire roast process from start to pulling beans, cupping, and deciding. To some it might be interesting, to others about as interesting as watching grass grow or paint drying.

 
I used to think the darker the better until I tried some really good medium roasts. A good medium roast I think just has a different flavor than a dark roast. Bright, smooth, sometimes fruity, and seems more "energizing" (even though thats not really a flavor lol just a feeling). Perfect way to start my mornings!

Now I can't seem to get past the burnt bitterness of dark roast, especially in more intense brew methods like French press and espresso.
 

malocchio

Contributor
Light to almost medium...I never knew how good light roast beans tasted until I got hooked on Greek traditional style coffee...With the light roast you can taste many more nuances of the bean, more of the coffee "fruit" flavors...It has been thought that the lighter roast will contain more caffeine ,but the beans are heavier because the liquids have not all been roasted out of the bean, so perhaps you use less of the light roast beans, and the caffeine equals out somewhat..
 
Dark roast all the way for me. I use french press for my daily morning cup. That said, I dislike Starbucks dark roast coffees. They all taste burnt to me. If I have to step foot in a Starbucks, I get their Pikes Peak medium roast. But when I'm making my coffee, dark roast works best for me.
 
My all time favorite is kinda blue collar: Dunkin donuts medium roast, but real strong, almost stiff enough to stand a spoon up in.
 
Although I love coffee, I don't drink enough of it to really know the differences (I average a cup a week), and it's hard to compare when they are spaced that far apart. I did however recently go to a Tims and ordered a small black (haven't ordered coffee from a Tims in a long time) and it kinda tasted like cig butts to me? Maybe it was just a bad pot *shrug*
 
I did however recently go to a Tims and ordered a small black (haven't ordered coffee from a Tims in a long time) and it kinda tasted like cig butts to me? Maybe it was just a bad pot *shrug*
I know this sounds harsh, but there's no such thing as "good pot" at "Tim's". People can tolerate coffee there only because they order their double-double so it could really be anything instead of coffee with that much sugar and cream. How do I know - well sometimes that's unfortunately the only option when traveling.
 
Dark roast all the way for me. I use french press for my daily morning cup. That said, I dislike Starbucks dark roast coffees. They all taste burnt to me. If I have to step foot in a Starbucks, I get their Pikes Peak medium roast. But when I'm making my coffee, dark roast works best for me.
I have some Pike's Peak and I do enjoy a cup now and again...
 
I normally prefer a light-medium roast, but will often add in 25-30 percent medium-dark roast to add some body and complexity. Maybe I'm strange that way. :001_huh:
 
I normally prefer a light-medium roast, but will often add in 25-30 percent medium-dark roast to add some body and complexity. Maybe I'm strange that way. :001_huh:
Blended coffee is what most people think of as coffee.

I used to be a blending fool. Everything I drank was blended.
 
Blended coffee is what most people think of as coffee.

I used to be a blending fool. Everything I drank was blended.
I thought most commercial blends were blended origin, but normally a single degree of roast.
Obviously, I could be mistaken in that presumption.
 
Coffee like Folgers and Maxwell house are blended coffees. Depending on the time of year, they could come from a number of different regions.

These companies have full time tasters/blenders who make sure their coffee always taste the same.
 
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