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What is your favorite BOLD cologne?

Not my favorite but bold!!!

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It's okay on a Saturday morning just running around in jeans and a t-shirt. One to two sprays will do!!
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So far my favorite bold cologne is..........
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Creed - Viking ...i've only tried a sample but it was fr*ggen powerhouse awesome !!!

Proraso - Wood & Spice ... i thought it was bit too churchy/incense at first but now i absolutely love it in the wintertime.
 

never-stop-learning

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No, you are thinking of an EDT...
Colognes, EdT and EdP.

With certain exceptions (Brut, for instance) colognes will be bolder (as I am understanding the definition for this thread) than AS. EdT than Cologne. EdP than Edt.

Source - TakeIt2Day Blog:

Eau Fraiche (Usually 3% or less perfume oil)
Eau de cologne - EDC (2 - 5% perfume oil)
Eau de toilette - EDT (4 - 10% perfume oil)
Eau de parfum - EDP (8 - 15% perfume oil)
Soie de Parfum (15 - 18% perfume oil)
PARFUM (15 - 25% -- also sometimes referred to as Extract or Extrait)
Perfume oil (15-30% perfume oil in an oil rather than alcohol base)


"Cologne" tends to be a bit of a generic term (think "Kleenex" ;)) these days - There are several EdT offerings on this thread.

I'm just checking what is meant by "bold"? Forward? Obnoxious? Drive everyone from the room? ;)

Anyway, I'm probably overthinking this and getting way too far into the weeds so I'll just say Gray Flannel. :)
 
Colognes, EdT and EdP.

With certain exceptions (Brut, for instance) colognes will be bolder (as I am understanding the definition for this thread) than AS. EdT than Cologne. EdP than Edt.

Source - TakeIt2Day Blog:

Eau Fraiche (Usually 3% or less perfume oil)
Eau de cologne - EDC (2 - 5% perfume oil)
Eau de toilette - EDT (4 - 10% perfume oil)
Eau de parfum - EDP (8 - 15% perfume oil)
Soie de Parfum (15 - 18% perfume oil)
PARFUM (15 - 25% -- also sometimes referred to as Extract or Extrait)
Perfume oil (15-30% perfume oil in an oil rather than alcohol base)


"Cologne" tends to be a bit of a generic term (think "Kleenex" ;)) these days - There are several EdT offerings on this thread.

I'm just checking what is meant by "bold"? Forward? Obnoxious? Drive everyone from the room? ;)

Anyway, I'm probably overthinking this and getting way too far into the weeds so I'll just say Gray Flannel. :)
A cologne at 5% cannot be bold. Brut to be bold is an EDT...

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Cologne is not a generic term, it's a defined structure.

Grey Flannel is an EDT...


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never-stop-learning

Contributor
Ambassador
A cologne at 5% cannot be bold. Brut to be bold is an EDT...

View attachment 1137280

Cologne is not a generic term, it's a defined structure.

Grey Flannel is an EDT...


View attachment 1137281
I know that it is a defined structure. That is what I stated.

You will also notice that the OP has not said a word about any of the EdTs that have been posted on this thread - and there are a few. In fact, the OP started the thread by naming Joop which from what I saw when I looked it up, is an EdT.

Therefore, my ASSUMPTION is that the OP is referencing the term "cologne" more as a generic term (my example of "Kleenex") than the stated structure "Cologne".

Does this answer your question? :)
 
I know that it is a defined structure. That is what I stated.

You will also notice that the OP has not said a word about any of the EdTs that have been posted on this thread - and there are a few. In fact, the OP started the thread by naming Joop which from what I saw when I looked it up, is an EdT.

Therefore, my ASSUMPTION is that the OP is referencing the term "cologne" more as a generic term (my example of "Kleenex") than the stated structure "Cologne".

Does this answer your question? :)
Where have you stated the defined structure? The structure is high citrus notes, and floral and herbs heart notes.


The word Cologne should be struck out in this thread as a Cologne cannot possibly be bold. And every referenced fragrance is an EDT. There is no generic term of Cologne, the French, Germans, Spanish, Portuguese, British, Turkish, and Italians all know what a Cologne is.
 

never-stop-learning

Contributor
Ambassador
Where have you stated the defined structure? The structure is high citrus notes, and floral and herbs heart notes.


The word Cologne should be struck out in this thread as a Cologne cannot possibly be bold. And every referenced fragrance is an EDT. There is no generic term of Cologne, the French, Germans, Spanish, Portuguese, British, Turkish, and Italians all know what a Cologne is.
We seem to be missing each other's points and, quite frankly, I am done with this conversation. If you want to argue further, you'll have to find someone else.

Have a wonderful, and blessed, Sunday. :)
 
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We seem to be missing each other's points and, quite frankly, I am done with this conversation. If you want to argue further, you'll have to find someone else.

Have a wonderful, and blessed, Sunday. :)
I knew that this thread was going to head down this path. Maybe we should just say that you're both right and move on?

From the fine folks at LuckyScent:

Eau de Cologne (EDC)
The least concentrated style of fragrance, with a perfume oil to alcohol ratio of only 2-5%. Originally referred to a specific style of lightly concentrated citrus-heavy fragrance created in Cologne, Germany, but is now used much more generally. Due to its lightness, an eau de cologne is typically bottled in large sizes and meant to be splashed on throughout the day.

Everyone wins!
 
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