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What is going on in the wet shaving world?

The most common deformity that I've seen is bent teeth on the old open combs, which I suppose is from dropping a soft brass razor onto the floor or (*gasp*) banging it on the sink to clear it, but deformities can happen to modern brass razors too, if mistreated or handled carelessly.
True. Those Old Type base plates can be a problem with their bent teeth. The Old Type caps can be a problem as well. Even if they look good to the naked eye, they can be bent. And of course, Old Type handles are famous for splitting open, though they are repairable. If in decent condition, the Old Type is a great but aggressive shaver, in my opinion. RazoRock makes a $20 clone that looks similar but is much smoother and less aggressive, perhaps less efficient too. And, of course, it comes in brand new condition, has a zamak head and is not a collectible antique. I totally understand why you would prefer the vintage model, and I totally understand why others would want a new one.
 
For me it's not just how functional a razor is (imho you could learn to shave with any of them, given time), I also have to like the look of the razor. It's like I am holding a piece of art while shaving and I look at my two Tataras on the stand everyday and it brings me joy each time. Of course, taste is subjective and hence we can be glad to have so many designs to choose from.
 

lasta

Blade Biter
For me it's not just how functional a razor is (imho you could learn to shave with any of them, given time), I also have to like the look of the razor. It's like I am holding a piece of art while shaving and I look at my two Tataras on the stand everyday and it brings me joy each time. Of course, taste is subjective and hence we can be glad to have so many designs to choose from.

To me, any razor that holds a blade can do its job!

Most important is how shiny it it. Old Type, New, Tech, Super Speed...everything Gillette made was shiny!

To get the same shine now, I have to pay 10-20x the price!

So yeah.
 

Tirvine

ancient grey sweatophile
I understand and respect collecting for the sake of collecting, and I understand buying razor after razor looking for "the one" (although this site can be invaluable in pointing such a seeker in the right direction, greatly narrowing and shortening the search). I appreciate the idea of using of a collection to rotate razors (and soaps, blades, brushes, and aftershaves) to experience variety. However, given the importance of technique in getting the best possible shaves, I wonder sometimes how such rotations impact that. I have one razor (Above the Tie Windsor) and two plates, mild and regular. I usually use the mild, but now and then I try the regular for variety, and the small required adjustments in technique can be a little annoying. I cannot imagine rotating among a good sized array, but I admire those who do it and like it. All I want is a baby's bottom shave in six or seven minutes with zero irritation every single day. It seems like a reasonable objective given how well that mild plate works for me. I could more easily see rotating the rest of the items, but it is so much easier to use limited choices I know will make me feel (and smell) better. BTW I got a tub of Martin de Candre Vetyver for Christmas, just as I finished off their Fougere. I am greatly enjoying the Vetyver, every day.
 
Yes, for many of us, it is the thrill of the chase. The thrill of the kill wears off pretty quickly, at least for me. Then there is the whole historical and nostalgic facet of vintage items that appeal to some more than others.

Many home buyers cherish the Craftsman homes, for example, versus the track homes here in SoCal that have 1/8" stucco exterior skin on top of another 1/2" of foam insulation and then the framing and interior drywall. Tear open a early or mid 20th century East coast interior wall and it is built better than these houses. Both work as shelter, just in different ways and levels of performance.
The thrill of the chase is valid for some. For most people I know, the thrill though is to impress others so, not a big thrill for me. I do enjoy using some of those things that are a thrill for others though!

In terms of modern housing, some of it is well-built and nice but, as noted modern tract housing is built cheaply so people can have ever larger and/or cheaper houses in most cases.

Older houses like those Craftsman are nice! My steel stud house I had built in Tucson was similar to, but not the same as, some of the nicer houses from the past. You can still build a Craftsman "quality" home today if you want to but, most people won't be able to afford the cost if they go for the huge houses most aspire to today! If you don't need a formal dining room, man cave, 3 or 4 bathrooms, etc. it is still possible for many people to own a quality built home but, cheap tract housing is a fact in high-density areas of major cities due to overcrowding and very high pricing.

In another 3 or 4 years, my current farmhouse will come down when my retirement funds become available and, at that time I will be building a small 'quality' house appropriate for a single man.

Until then, it is the simple luxuries of life like a good safety razor, some good bourbon, and the slow life out in the country. It was nice during the COVID craziness when people were hoarding toilet paper to just put a lock on the front gate and hang out watching the cows nurse their calves and enjoy some nice slow-cooked meals which wouldn't be possible in tract housing.
 
For me it's not just how functional a razor is (imho you could learn to shave with any of them, given time), I also have to like the look of the razor. It's like I am holding a piece of art while shaving and I look at my two Tataras on the stand everyday and it brings me joy each time. Of course, taste is subjective and hence we can be glad to have so many designs to choose from.
Exactly. Hence my search for a Birch handle for my Muhle Mocca!
 
For me it's not just how functional a razor is (imho you could learn to shave with any of them, given time), I also have to like the look of the razor. It's like I am holding a piece of art while shaving and I look at my two Tataras on the stand everyday and it brings me joy each time. Of course, taste is subjective and hence we can be glad to have so many designs to choose from.

I'm all-in on this. This is the reason we are passionate about this (to a fault, at times) as a hobby.

I have always been a proponent of "use what ever works, especially if it makes you happy" which is why I never judge. It's very personal.
 

Mr. Shavington

Knows Hot Turkish Toilets
Vintage razors are often attractive and work well, but there is a difference with modern CNC precision-made razors produced by skilled machinists using state-of-the-art equipment. And some of the new designs are fundamentally innovative and different from what came before - partly because new production methods make it possible. We shouldn’t close our minds to the possibilities that come from new methods, and just assume nothing can be improved upon.
 
The earlier comment about modern razors shaving no better than cheap vintage razors (paraphrased) would have been a comment I agreed with until I discovered Blackbird. My SS Blackbird outperforms any vintage razor I own. The Titanium Bird is even better for me.

That being said my Ball End Old Type that approximates my Father’s birth year and my Goodwill #164 and Ball End New LC that surround my Mother’s birth year are special. Equally special are my birth quarter C4 Flare Tip Superspeed and my A4 Red Tip from my late wife’s birth quarter. Rounding out my vintages are an E4 Fatboy from my brother’s birth quarter and my New SC. The New SC taught me how to use the proper pressure and made all of my razors shave better.

For me, there is nothing wrong with turning a chore into an enjoyable ritual and if making some acquisitions along the way facilitates it, so be it.

Lets not even talk about brushes, soaps or aftershaves.
 
To me, any razor that holds a blade can do its job!

Most important is how shiny it it. Old Type, New, Tech, Super Speed...everything Gillette made was shiny!

To get the same shine now, I have to pay 10-20x the price!

So yeah.
I know what you mean. I bought an inexpensive 1960s travel Tech I saw in an antique store, mainly because it was in absolute mint condition, maybe used once or twice, if at all, and then put away in its tiny original case for 50+ years. Then I put that shiny but vintage Tech head on a beautiful new tropical hardwood handle from Elite Razor. I also have my birth year, actually birth quarter, Super Speed in shiny almost like-new condition. Very classy. But I've found modern versions, such as the Rockwell 6S and RazoRock Game Changer, to be better shavers and still well under $100.
 
I've been wet shaving for quite a while but haven't been on here until the past few weeks after not
keeping up for a number of years. What is going on now? Seems like everybody and his brother are
making double edge razors acting like it's something new now and hundreds if not thousands of shave soap makers. I see a lot of
new people spending hundreds if not thousands of dollars on the latest and greatest razors and creams
being disappointed in their shaves not realizing an old $15 used Gillette will give them just as good a shave
if they learn how to use it
In honor of your post, to which I replied too harshly (my apologies) I shaved this morning with my 61-year-old Gillette Slim, purchased years ago at an antique shop for $17 in scratched and worn but usable condition (it would have been better had a rusty blade from the late 60s not been left inside). This is the best of the vintage razors I've tried, and they seem to go for about $20-$60 in decent shape on ebay these days, a beat-up example like mine maybe only $15. But I don't think people who buy the high-end razors don't know about the Slim. They are just having some fun that they can afford.
 
Vintage razors are often attractive and work well, but there is a difference with modern CNC precision-made razors produced by skilled machinists using state-of-the-art equipment. And some of the new designs are fundamentally innovative and different from what came before - partly because new production methods make it possible. We shouldn’t close our minds to the possibilities that come from new methods, and just assume nothing can be improved upon.
Same here. I have a Yates, a Henson and a Merica and I appreciate that these were precision machined out of solid metal pieces. They have tight tolerances and a quality feel.
 
Wait, someone is on a hobby/enthusiast web site asking why people are still buying the very thing we’re here to discuss? 😕
No my question is why people spend 2 or 3 hundred dollars on one of a hundred different razor brands on a razor they don't even know will work for them and do it over until they find one thats right.
 
Same here. I have a Yates, a Henson and a Merica and I appreciate that these were precision machined out of solid metal pieces. They have tight tolerances and a quality feel.
I've asked this question before with no answer. How much tighter are the tolerances on a razor made on a CNC machine than a vintage Gillette stamped brass razor and does that difference make a difference? I'd be willing to bet you could lay the 2 side by side and not be able to visually tell the difference
 
I've asked this question before with no answer. How much tighter are the tolerances on a razor made on a CNC machine than a vintage Gillette stamped brass razor and does that difference make a difference? I'd be willing to bet you could lay the 2 side by side and not be able to visually tell the difference
Visually? Maybe, with my glasses on. I do think you can feel when the blade is not aligned well on a shave. I guess measuring them with machine shop measuring tools would be the best way to answer the first part of your question though.
 
This type of argument never holds any merit. Hobbies aren’t about flat, non-emotional “best” results. And, even if they were, best is an inherently subjective word.

I returned after several years away and was actually blown away at the growth. If one has discretionary income to buy razors that cost more than the rent in my first apartment, fantastic. Better that than other things people can use their funds on.

Everyone’s experience is their own. If extracting a results-to-cost ratio at the most optimal figure is the goal, great. Get an old Gillette from one of the Etsy cats, buy blades in bulk and sail off into your sunset. What if novel experience, exploration and experimentation are the goal?

Perhaps all your clothes are sourced in downtown garment districts? Do you shop exclusively at the discount grocer? No doubt a Hyundai in the driveway.
 
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