What's new
  • Guest
    As per our long standing policy of not permitting medical advice on the forum - all threads concerning the Coronavirus will be locked.
    For more info on the coronavirus please see the link below:
    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/summary.html

What Are You Reading?

cryhavoc

Contributor
The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco. I haven't read this book in over a decade and forgot how much I like it. I'll probably need to re read Foucault's Pendulum when I finish this book.
 
Just finished 'Soif' (Thirst) by Amélie Nothomb. Now starting 'Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead' by Olga Tokarczuk.
 
I have two going at the moment - H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald and Barbarian Days by William Finnegan. Two very different books, but both are excellent so far.
 

beginish

Moderator Emeritus
The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco. I haven't read this book in over a decade and forgot how much I like it. I'll probably need to re read Foucault's Pendulum when I finish this book.
I like Foucaults Pendulum better than The Name of the Rose.
 
Dennis E. Taylor: Outland

I found this novel in German in the public library in Reutlingen, Germany, and checked it out spontaneously. P1050425.JPG
 

Owen Bawn

"Ask me about a fluffernutter"
Having finished Mary Beard's SPQR I'm returning to re-read Gibbons' Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. I've read much of it before, but not from cover to cover- more a chapter here on a topic, a couple chapters there on another topic. I've also downloaded Gibbons' Autobiographies from the Internet Archive, though I don't know if I'll actually read them. I'm interested in his conversions in and out of deism, Catholicism, and several different forms of Protestantism, most of which occurred when he was a young man.

Still working on Fitzpatrick's The Boys of St Columb's. I'd like to finish it this afternoon. A remarkable story of a single generation of young men who attended the same school and had incredibly rich and productive lives of real influence on the world.
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
Moderator
Having listened to every available podcast episode it seemed only natural to buy the book. Starting it today.

View attachment 1192212
Done with this one. I found it just as entertaining as their podcast, probably even more so. I also found the footnotes a bit annoying, just like their off topic banter on the podcast. But not enough to not read (or listen).

Moving on the Freakonomics. I bought the paperback, but really wanted the hardcover. Last night I found the hardcover and bought that too. Then I thought “I wonder if I have the ebook?”. Sure enough, I already have the ebook. So I have 3 copies....


450864D1-5E13-4751-8021-7DB187218A85.jpeg
 

beginish

Moderator Emeritus
Having finished Mary Beard's SPQR I'm returning to re-read Gibbons' Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. I've read much of it before, but not from cover to cover- more a chapter here on a topic, a couple chapters there on another topic. I've also downloaded Gibbons' Autobiographies from the Internet Archive, though I don't know if I'll actually read them. I'm interested in his conversions in and out of deism, Catholicism, and several different forms of Protestantism, most of which occurred when he was a young man.

Still working on Fitzpatrick's The Boys of St Columb's. I'd like to finish it this afternoon. A remarkable story of a single generation of young men who attended the same school and had incredibly rich and productive lives of real influence on the world.
Octavian FTW.

After finishing SPQR, I moved on to Asimov’s ‘Foundation,’ which I loved. Moving on to ‘Murder by Other Means’ by John Scalzi on audio. I have also started The Overstory by Richard Powers in hard copy.
 

JWCowboy

Probably not Al Bundy
Done with this one. I found it just as entertaining as their podcast, probably even more so. I also found the footnotes a bit annoying, just like their off topic banter on the podcast. But not enough to not read (or listen).

Moving on the Freakonomics. I bought the paperback, but really wanted the hardcover. Last night I found the hardcover and bought that too. Then I thought “I wonder if I have the ebook?”. Sure enough, I already have the ebook. So I have 3 copies....


View attachment 1195015
I loved this and the sequel, SuperFreakonomics. Both are great reads.
 

JWCowboy

Probably not Al Bundy
Having finished Mary Beard's SPQR I'm returning to re-read Gibbons' Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. I've read much of it before, but not from cover to cover- more a chapter here on a topic, a couple chapters there on another topic. I've also downloaded Gibbons' Autobiographies from the Internet Archive, though I don't know if I'll actually read them. I'm interested in his conversions in and out of deism, Catholicism, and several different forms of Protestantism, most of which occurred when he was a young man.

Still working on Fitzpatrick's The Boys of St Columb's. I'd like to finish it this afternoon. A remarkable story of a single generation of young men who attended the same school and had incredibly rich and productive lives of real influence on the world.
Bravo for reading Gibbon's Magnum Opus. I purchased a set a few years ago and it is on my "To Read" list
 
My Fellow Readers:
I'm now reading the 3rd (and final...😢), novel by British author Luke Jennings, Killing Eve: Die For Me which was published April 7, 2020.

As you know, "The 2018 prequel Codename Villanelle is a compilation of four serial e-book novellas published in 2014–2016, and the sequel novel Killing Eve: No Tomorrow was published in 2019.

Villanelle's character is a Russian orphan who, after murdering the killers of her gangster father, was rescued from prison by The Twelve and trained as a hitwoman and compensated with a luxurious life in the West. Villanelle becomes the quarry of British intelligence agent Eve Polastri".

Killing Eve - Book 3.jpeg

In this final installment, "As Villanelle returns to face her childhood demons and the Russian winter, Eve finds herself on the run from The Twelve, who want her dead. As the action moves between London and St Petersburg, and Eve and Villanelle finally admit their mutual erotic obsession, the chess game approaches its lethal, unforgettable conclusion:".

Works Cited: Killing Eve: Die for Me

"[Reading] A book is a device to ignite the imagination". Alan Bennett
 

beginish

Moderator Emeritus
Octavian FTW.

After finishing SPQR, I moved on to Asimov’s ‘Foundation,’ which I loved. Moving on to ‘Murder by Other Means’ by John Scalzi on audio. I have also started The Overstory by Richard Powers in hard copy.
The Overstory is nothing short of astonishing. The writing is somehow very readable but on another level entirely. The same goes for The Color Purple, which I am doing on audio. Talk about a way to finish an awful year.
 
Top Bottom