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Water Trapped In Brush

I received a Thater 4125//2 about a week ago. While I love it dearly I do have one complaint with it and I'm not sure how to fix it. I soak my brush and when I go to lather I shake out excess water and squeeze the brush to get the rest of the water out. I've been doing some test palm lathering with some new soaps and when I squeeze the extra lather out of the brush some water comes out with it. I think that extra water might be eating the lather I have in the brush while I'm shaving. My lather is great for the first pass but so-so by the second pass and I think the water trapped in the brush is causing this. Is there anything I can do to fix this?
 
Is it possible you're not getting enough product? A lot of mixing goes on inside the brush. Final squeeze after 3 passes should yield a dense lather. If you've still got excess water after one pass it sounds like you're not mixing enough soap in, or building lather for too short a time.
 
Is it possible you're not getting enough product? A lot of mixing goes on inside the brush. Final squeeze after 3 passes should yield a dense lather. If you've still got excess water after one pass it sounds like you're not mixing enough soap in, or building lather for too short a time.
It is probably a combination of not enough product and not enough mixing. Good point on the mixing. I should have assumed to try more product. That fixes just about everything.:thumbup: this brush is the biggest I've owned at 26mm so more soap makes sense.
 
Badger hair does not need soaking like a Boar bristle brush. Just dip and shake. It doesn't need to be squeezed. You do that with sponges, not quality knots.
 
Badger hair does not need soaking like a Boar bristle brush. Just dip and shake. It doesn't need to be squeezed. You do that with sponges, not quality knots.
You're the only one out of thousands of posts that I've read over the past three years that has said that badger brushes don't need soaking.
 
You're the only one out of thousands of posts that I've read over the past three years that has said that badger brushes don't need soaking.
Long ago I soaked my brush for at least two minutes because it was a Boar Bristle knot. Boar does not absorb water quickly badger absorbs water quickly, almost like a magnet picking up nails. On one website (Shaving 101) they recommended soaking up to a minute. I no longer have any Pure Badger..... Only Best, Super or Silvertip. These grades absorb even more quickly than Pure. My personal experience that I shared is that simply dipping my brush for a few moments and giving it a shake or two loaded me up with all the water that I would need for a decent lather. If I am using my Becker Scuttle for a warm lather shave the brush would be treated differently. My Boar brushes get at least two minutes of hot soak because the bristle has slower absorption than Badger Hair. The physics concerning these two knots has been a subject addressed on shaving forums for many years and I have through the experience of wet shaving over fifty years decided that much of what is shared on the forums is pretty accurate. There are a lot of beginners who have just discovered brushes and safety razors who rely on forums for help in what to buy and how to use it. There are also those who are new to this that have become overnight experts. Some share true wisdom and some share newly formed opinions.......... Back to the need to soak a Badger knot. You will find through research that Badger Hair has similar soaking characteristics as human hair and that both absorb water quickly. I don't have to soak my head when I shampoo and it doesn't take me long to shave unless I select one of my Boar brushes. I enjoy the luxury of carrying on a tradition shared with me by my father and grandfather. What I share is what I believe and have experienced first hand. I hope to have credibility and not repeat any advice that I have not personally tested and found it to work for me I am 68 years on this earth and freely admit I still have much to learn. I miss the way things used to be when I could go into a drugstore and find all my shaving needs. Things have changed and now I have to shop on Amazon and Ebay to even replace my razor blades. However the huge choice of quality brushes and razors that we find on websites far surpass what was easily available when i began this journey. I wish you all Happy Shaving.
 
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