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Watch Ya Wearing

It should be here in a couple of days.
As I don't have proper Bergeon tongs assembly could be a bit tricky.
Interesting that you bring this up, as I just changed out a bracelet myself not a half-hour ago.

You don't really need a pricey Bergeon tool to do it. A fine fork spring bar tool will do, both for removal and replacement. The end links make it a little tricky, but not insurmountably so.

If you will need to resize the bracelet, opening a link now would be a good idea. The whole exercise is easier with the bracelet open and flat.

You'll be fine. Just be patient and prepare to say scheisse a lot.

If all else fails, there's always a jeweler--which is a helluva lot cheaper than a Bergeon tool (though serviceable Chinese tools are available from Amazon for about $30 USD).
 
Interesting that you bring this up, as I just changed out a bracelet myself not a half-hour ago.

You don't really need a pricey Bergeon tool to do it. A fine fork spring bar tool will do, both for removal and replacement. The end links make it a little tricky, but not insurmountably so.

If you will need to resize the bracelet, opening a link now would be a good idea. The whole exercise is easier with the bracelet open and flat.

You'll be fine. Just be patient and prepare to say scheisse a lot.

If all else fails, there's always a jeweler--which is a helluva lot cheaper than a Bergeon tool (though serviceable Chinese tools are available from Amazon for about $30 USD).
Yeah the proper ones are about 200 bucks, no way I spend that much for a one time exercise. Forks and fine punches I have plenty.
 
My new Steel Dive SD-1970. This one is unbranded. In 1970 I remember my dad getting his first Seiko -- it was not the model that this one is homag'ing -- but rather it had a gorgeous blue face that just played with the light. It was heavy -- not a quartz -- I remember him doing the "Seiko shuffle" with it, so I assume it was an Auto. Dad was in the Air Force, and he was an enlisted man, so he did not have a lot of money to spend on anything, much less a watch. However there was this brand, Seiko, that seemed to cater to the folks who couldn't spend a paycheck on a watch, but they wanted a watch that looked nice. Times have changed, and my dad is gone (as are unfortunately the Seiko's that he had for decades), but the combination of the style of this watch, and the color of the face.....well, they make me think of him, and the day he came home with his watch in 1970.
Very cool story. I'm retired AF (I'm only 43 and retired 5 years ago, 20 yrs) and been into Seikos awhile. Great watches. While we didn't make nears as much as officers, when I was stationed in Germany I picked up a nice watch, Rolex Sub. I didn't go out for awhile lol.
 
Installation and shortening of the Jubilee was done in 10 minutes so my fear was for nothing.
Feeling on the wrist is great!
View attachment 1287125
Steinhart builds splendid watches. Yours looks just wonderful on the wrist. Happy to hear installation was easy and painless.

I gather that unlike on the ExII, you can set the orange pointer hand to whatever time zone you choose (unless, of course, you're a spelunker. ;) )
 
Steinhart builds splendid watches. Yours looks just wonderful on the wrist. Happy to hear installation was easy and painless.

I gather that unlike on the ExII, you can set the orange pointer hand to whatever time zone you choose (unless, of course, you're a spelunker. ;) )
Yes, it’s an ETA 2893 with a true GMT complication so a perfect travel watch. I think Rolex changed the slaved 24 hour hand with the second iteration of the EX II the 16550.
 
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