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Watch Strap Question

For those of you who own a watch with a leather strap:
Do you wash, oil, polish, etc. the leather?
With what, and what's your process?

Thanks :)
 
Leather regardless of what it’s made into needs hydration, all my leather straps get lightly washed when I wash my watch at the end of the week, you don’t want to soak the strap just scrub lightly with a soft bristle brush and some very mild soap, I use Wristclean, anyway after lightly scrubbing and then doing a quick rinse I pat the strap dry then apply a neutral polish like Venetian shoe cream and what ever product you choose to use you don’t need a lot
 
I never gave it much thought until you asked the question. Now I think it would make sense to condition the leather like I do my shoes....therefore, I've just finished giving my watchbands a coat of Saphir Renovateur.
 

ajkel64

Moderator
Great question. I currently wear steel bracelet watches but in the past I never did any maintenance on leather bands. Will consider this when I change to leather watch bands again.
 

Doc4

I'm calling the U.N.
Moderator Emeritus
The only "leather" watch bands I've worn have been so cheaply made as to not be worth maintenance.
 
Mink oil here. It does tend to darken leather a bit, which is something I like as it imparts a bit of burnished character--especially to bright, new tan straps.

I use it on both sides to help prevent sweat rot. Works reasonably well and buffs up nicely.
 
I use a tiny bit of shoe cream and carefully brush it in, or rub it in with a soft cloth, maybe monthly.

Leather is leather. If shoe cream is good for our shoes, I would think it's fine for watch straps, belts, wallets and purses. It should be stressed, however, to use only small amounts and to brush or rub in in thoroughly, to avoid staining our clothes or skin. Less is more.
 
I had this strap that was looking horrible, and Ballistol fixed it. This stuff is great for everything.... Looks better than new. Just applied Ballistol twice...with a soaking Qtip.
 

Desmodromic

Contributor
Like Whilliam, a touch of mink oil if it's needed but most times I just wipe down the strap as the patina a nice leather strap gains over time is part of the charm.
 
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