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Traditional Soap

I am a great admirer of traditional soap.
To me traditional soap is a simple blend of oil, usually Olive oil and either Lye (Sodium hydroxide) or Soda Ash (Sodium carbonate), and water - preferably saltwater. With the additions of essential oils such as Laurel. This is made in a cauldron, using the hot process method rather than the cold process method.
I have no idea whether the definition of Castile soap which essentially is the above without the addition of essential oils is either a hot, cold process or both.

Traditional soap is produced around the Mediterranean. France produces Savon de Marseille. They are currently squabbling over the current definition as many manufacturers use modern methods of production using additives and a soap noodle base.

Aleppo and Nablus produce soaps of renown. Aleppo soap is now being produced in France, Jordan, Turkey and Tunisia.

Greece, Turkey, and Tunisia produce traditional soaps. Turkish Laurel soap is called Daphne soap which is similar to Aleppo Laurel soap.

Lebanon produces Baladi soap. Whilst Al Ghar soap is the term used across the Arab Middle East for Laurel traditional soap, including Aleppo and Baladi.

Jordan is producing soaps inspired by either the Aleppo and Nablus method due to the displacement of the soapmakers or family tradition.

Although triple milled soaps are great, they are a more refined soap with exquisite scents. Traditional soap maybe used for hand and face washing, bathing and showering, as a shampoo, as a washing detergent for clothes or as household cleaner. Which your great grandmother probably did.
 
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Thanks for the nice post.

I'll add that the four “Union of Professional Makers of Savon de Marseille” members who carry the SdM logo of authenticity are

Le Serail
Fer à Cheval
Marius Fabre
Savonnerie du Midi (La Corvette/Maître Augustin)



The union requirements:
  • at least 72% of soap must be saponified plant oil(s)
  • no animal product
  • made in Marseille or the Marseille region
  • traditional cauldron method
  • fragrance-free, no dyes, no preservatives
 
So, I'm curious why you like the traditional soaps more than some of the other good soaps out there? How does the Aleppo soap compare with Marseilles soap or Turkish soap? It seems similar except for the laurel oil.
I like all real soaps, I prefer traditional soaps in the summer. In winter I prefer triple milled scented French, Italian, and Portuguese soaps which are more moisturizing. There isn't much difference, although Nablus soap is harder to lather. I use a Kessa mitt, so do not really have a problem. You obviously don't have the hoarding gene? Why not have all? These are artisanal crafts that could be lost.

Try it on a hot day, a traditional soap and kessa mitt. A warm and cold shower. Followed by Mediterranean cologne. Clean cotton clothes, or bedding. What's not to like?
 
...You obviously don't have the hoarding gene? Why not have all? These are artisanal crafts that could be lost.

Try it on a hot day, a traditional soap and kessa mitt. A warm and cold shower. Followed by Mediterranean cologne. Clean cotton clothes, or bedding. What's not to like?
I've been using a few different brands of Castile soap with a coconut oil formulation. When supplies run low, I'd like to try some Marseilles soap or Aleppo soap.
 
I've been using a few different brands of Castile soap with a coconut oil formulation. When supplies run low, I'd like to try some Marseilles soap or Aleppo soap.
The Palm version of SdM should be similar to Castile. Olive oil soaps are harder to lather, but I always use a mit of some kind.
 
I'm beginning to prefer pure glycerine soap and I feel that the more creamy luxuriant soaps feel as if they clog my pores and this applies also to shaving soaps?
 
I'm beginning to prefer pure glycerine soap and I feel that the more creamy luxuriant soaps feel as if they clog my pores and this applies also to shaving soaps?
Which brand? Too many glycerine soaps are adulterated. Traditional soaps are the opposite of luxury soaps.
 
Here in the UK Waitrose's Pure Glycerine Soap
I have a stack of those myself. Made by Droyts. I often use it as pre shave, although it can upset my Rosacea. They are great as a facial/hand soap. They wouldn't last long in the shower but they're around a £1.00. I have promoted them as an alternative to the reformulated Pears soap. Droyts do a range of bath sized bars. I have their shaving soap. I must order direct and try their own range. If you enjoy these check out the Spanish glycerine soaps.
 
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Appreciate this post. I'm not very knowledgable, but feel like I could stand to benefit from traditional soap (both that I have sensitive skin so am drawn toward the simplicity, and that I tend to like the ur-version of just about anything). I've used Castile soaps in the past, but will branch out to Aleppo and the proper Savon de Marseille.

One question, you mention that triple-milled soaps are more moisturizing, could you delve into that? There are some particularly dry times of year where I live, so I feel that a balance of traditional/milled could make sense for me. Are there any similar rules of thumb to keep there, for the Portugese, French, etc? Is Musgo too commercial in this genre?
 
Appreciate this post. I'm not very knowledgable, but feel like I could stand to benefit from traditional soap (both that I have sensitive skin so am drawn toward the simplicity, and that I tend to like the ur-version of just about anything). I've used Castile soaps in the past, but will branch out to Aleppo and the proper Savon de Marseille.

One question, you mention that triple-milled soaps are more moisturizing, could you delve into that? There are some particularly dry times of year where I live, so I feel that a balance of traditional/milled could make sense for me. Are there any similar rules of thumb to keep there, for the Portugese, French, etc? Is Musgo too commercial in this genre?
Most triple milled soaps have added Shea butter or Almond oil. My current favourite triple milled soaps are Castelbel from Portugal. I find a lot of Italian triple milled soaps lack added moisturisers. Musgo don't market triple milled soaps as far as I am aware. They will be branded under the Ach Brito or Claus Porto brands. A lot more expensive than Castelbel, and strangely sometimes they add SLS so I avoid them. There are lots of generic French Shea Butter soaps such as PdP, the list is endless.
 
Most triple milled soaps have added Shea butter or Almond oil. My current favourite triple milled soaps are Castelbel from Portugal. I find a lot of Italian triple milled soaps lack added moisturisers. Musgo don't market triple milled soaps as far as I am aware. They will be branded under the Ach Brito or Claus Porto brands. A lot more expensive than Castelbel, and strangely sometimes they add SLS so I avoid them. There are lots of generic French Shea Butter soaps such as PdP, the list is endless.
Thanks - for whatever reason, my shaving soap experience hadn't yet caused me to look over to the soaps I use for general purposes, so this is a good start for me.
 
...Musgo don't market triple milled soaps as far as I am aware. They will be branded under the Ach Brito or Claus Porto brands...
What Claus Porto says about the milling of their soaps: “several times,” and “up to three times.”

...sometimes they add SLS...
Some of their soaps have Sodium Thiosulfate (fragrance stabilizer), but I'm unaware of any of them having detergents like Sodium Lauryl/Laureth Sulfate.

Nice arrivals, enjoy!
 
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