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Top 3 Stanley Kubrick films.....ranked.

If your a fan, this one is tough. I’ve gone back and forth a few times, so many great movies. Here goes....

1: Barry Lyndon
2: Lolita
3: 2001: A Space Odyssey


I said it was going to be tough!
 

oc_in_fw

Contributor
2001
Clockwork orange
The shining

Although it's hard not to include Dr. Strangelove


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From time to time I watch old horror movies. As I have gotten older, most do nothing for me. The Shining still holds up. When the girls say “come play with us” I get a shiver. I just got a shiver typing that.
 
In no particular order . . .

A Clockwork Orange
Full Metal Jacket
Dr. Strangelove


I am willing to be convinced that 2001 supersedes Strangelove. The reason I did not put it on my list is that I so loved the book, and felt that Kubrick's film is less an adaptation of the novel, but Kubrick's idea of how Clarke "should" have written it.
 

Doc4

I'm calling the U.N.
Moderator Emeritus
YearFilmDirectorWriterProducerNotes
1953Fear and DesireYesNoYesDirectorial debut;
Also cinematographer, editor and sound department (uncredited)
1955Killer's KissYesStoryYesAlso cinematographer and editor
1956The KillingYesYesNo
1957Paths of GloryYesYesNoExecutive Producer (uncredited)
1960SpartacusYesNoNo
1962LolitaYesUncreditedNo
1964Dr. StrangeloveYesYesYes
19682001: A Space OdysseyYesYesYesAlso special photographic effects designer and editor
1971A Clockwork OrangeYesYesYesAlso additional camera operator (uncredited)
1975Barry LyndonYesYesYes
1980The ShiningYesYesYes
1987Full Metal JacketYesYesYes
1999Eyes Wide ShutYesYesYesAlso additional camera operator (uncredited)

Spartacus certainly tops my list.
 

The Knize

Moderator Emeritus
Wow, that is tough. Great director.

So tough that I do not think I can do it. Except that I have seen 2001 in recent years and I did not think it quite held up. I also agree, not really an adaptation of the Clarke novel.

I was a big fan of Clockwork the book and I thought SK did an amazing job translating that into a movie. I would not have thought it could be done. I probably could have said the same about Lolita. Spartacus, The Shining, Strangelove, FMJ, all wonderful films.
 

oc_in_fw

Contributor
In no particular order . . .

A Clockwork Orange
Full Metal Jacket
Dr. Strangelove


I am willing to be convinced that 2001 supersedes Strangelove. The reason I did not put it on my list is that I so loved the book, and felt that Kubrick's film is less an adaptation of the novel, but Kubrick's idea of how Clarke "should" have written it.
Dr. Strangelove was genius. I love the first half of Full Metal Jacket- he just let R. Lee Ermy do his thing.
 
Gotta be
Dr. Strangelove
A Clockwork Orange
Full Metal Jacket

(Or, maybe, I'm feeling a bit dystopian this evening.)
Yes. It’s tricky. The movies are so unique. They appeal (or do not) on so many different levels. I do believe they need to be viewed multiple times. I barely got through Barry Lyndon upon first viewing, when I was younger. I have come to appreciate the deliberate pacing and expansive cinematography. A period piece of extraordinary detail. I think I will revisit his films starting with Paths of Glory, see where it takes me.
 

The Knize

Moderator Emeritus
Yes. It’s tricky. The movies are so unique. They appeal (or do not) on so many different levels. I do believe they need to be viewed multiple times. I barely got through Barry Lyndon upon first viewing, when I was younger. I have come to appreciate the deliberate pacing and expansive cinematography. A period piece of extraordinary detail. I think I will revisit his films starting with Paths of Glory, see where it takes me.
I have trouble remembering Barry Lyndon. I do not remember loving it. I am not feeling a great draw to rewatching it. But I hesitate to dis it. I see no one is picking Eyes Wide Shut. Makes sense to me.
 
It's funny how wildly different the two parts of that movie are, particularly on rewatching. I often find myself just skipping the post Parris Island part of the film for this reason.
I agree. Many of his movies do not follow the conventional structure. They challenge the viewer to become engaged. The abrupt changes can be jolting, it throws you off balance. That’s why I go back and experience them again, not just watch.
 

TexLaw

Fussy Evil Genius
Contributor
I see no one is picking Eyes Wide Shut. Makes sense to me.
Oddly enough, I just watched that one again last week. It just isn't very good. It's a great looking film, but there just isn't much substance.

I believe my three are:

1. A Clockwork Orange
2. The Shining
3. Dr. Strangelove (just edging out Full Metal Jacket)

I'm still thinking about it, though, and I might reshuffle.

2001 isn't going to make the list, though. It's terrific, but it's just not Top 3. I give Kubrick a pass on how faithful the adaptation is. That book has so many abstract concepts and non-visual elements, I don't know how anyone could adapt it. Best of luck to anyone who tries.
 

The Knize

Moderator Emeritus
Oddly enough, I just watched that one again last week. It just isn't very good. It's a great looking film, but there just isn't much substance.
I think of it as kind of a fever dream. Sort of like a Kubrick Blue Velvet. David Lynch was really better in the genre though. I am not a big Tom Cruise fan, but I think he deserves props for that one. I do usually rather like Nicole Kidman, but I am not sure about her in Eyes. Gimmicky title for a film anyway. Maybe SK just ran out of ideas and energy by the age at which he made that film. He really was a wonderful director in his prime which lasted decades.
 
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