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Time to Embrace my Masculinity

I wondered about that!

I though Gillette might have their hand in the cookie jar of other brands that are subsidiaries (questioned if they made that barbosal cream), but did not do my due diligence on everything I purchased.

Thank you, sir! Granted, the $5 I spent on them probably only added $2.19 to their coffers, but the toxic among us need to band together and starve them of their hate-speech fund. :)

...because I am not (that) stupid, I'll use them; but I won't buy them again, that's for sure. :eek2:
I saw the same ad, and I'm not sure where the "hate speech" was. Sure, it was oddly preachy for a big corporation... but just keep in mind a substantial number of P&G customers are women with potentially very different perspectives.
 
I use a Merkur 38C every day--my guess is you'll come to love it. I find it to be a great mid-point razor. By that I mean it's not as mild as some but not nearly as aggressive as others. I've used a few on each side of the equation and kept coming back to the 38C. But it works for me, and your needs may be entirely different.

Putting a Feather in that bad boy is, indeed, manly, I would say! I'd wait until you have your technique down before attempting such a masculine act. :biggrin1:
Sage advice; many thanks, sir.

I keep hearing caveats about how sharp they are, so I will use them after I develop a good deal of confidence in my craft, moving the other brands to the top of the queue ahead of the feathers, then.

Is there a blade that stands out as a great go-to for a rookie who shaves nearly daily and who's been shaving with crap all his life? :blush:
 
Sage advice; many thanks, sir.

I keep hearing caveats about how sharp they are, so I will use them after I develop a good deal of confidence in my craft, moving the other brands to the top of the queue ahead of the feathers, then.

Is there a blade that stands out as a great go-to for a rookie who shaves nearly daily and who's been shaving with crap all his life? :blush:
Derby Extra or Dorco Platinum. They may not last for alot of shaves but you should be able to manage at least 2-3 unless you have an exceptionally tough beard.

My dad shaves with Derby blades. I gave him about 100 of them years ago and he's still working through them. I gave him samplers but he keeps returning to Derby.

I use Shark Super Stainless. I wouldn't use a Feather. Too expensive, and the blades are too aggressive, even in a mild razor. Very experienced shavers often prefer them, however, or other crazy-sharp blades.

If those don't work with you, there are alot of other blades out there to try. But Derby and Dorco are good places to start. Just buy a sampler that includes them.
 
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I saw the same ad, and I'm not sure where the "hate speech" was. Sure, it was oddly preachy for a big corporation... but just keep in mind a substantial number of P&G customers are women with potentially very different perspectives.
I bet an even larger share of their customers are "women" now, judging from P&G's $8 billion write-down/loss attributed to Gillette since they became woke.

They hate me, my lifestyle, and want to push their gender agenda on America in a disgusting attempt to sell more razors; teaching a 13 year old girl to shave is fine, but giving aforementioned girl testosterone/hormone therapy, chest reconstructive surgeries, and chopping up her whoo-whoo is child abuse.

...but I digress and just here to learn about wet shaving. :)
 
Nice kit, Terp.
BTW- If you didn't already know, Astra and Chinese Wilkinson blades are both Gillette products (however, German Wilkinsons are not).
Good call:

In 1996, Astra joined The Gillette Company, who later, in 2005, merged with Procter & Gamble, making Astra a brand of Procter & Gamble. Astra blades are now being manufactured in the Procter & Gamble plant in Russia.
 
I bet an even larger share of their customers are "women" now, judging from P&G's $8 billion write-down/loss attributed to Gillette since they became woke.

They hate me, my lifestyle, and want to push their gender agenda on America in a disgusting attempt to sell more razors; teaching a 13 year old girl to shave is fine, but giving aforementioned girl testosterone/hormone therapy, chest reconstructive surgeries, and chopping up her whoo-whoo is child abuse.
This is mostly a place that just focuses on shaving (with the exception of the barbershop and various clubhouse-oriented sections). Just keep in mind you'll find a variety of political orientations on the forum and a variety of lifestyles. I used to be more involved in the local LGBT center, for instance, and you'll find a variety of opinions on Gillette here.
 
I'm glad they have you playing identity politics; no one said anything about "political orientations" whatsoever. You seem confrontational (another tactic).

I'll bow out of my own thread and let you take the victory, sir (presumptuous, I know).

Thank you to everyone who offered advice...much, much appreciated.
 
Sage advice; many thanks, sir.

I keep hearing caveats about how sharp they are, so I will use them after I develop a good deal of confidence in my craft, moving the other brands to the top of the queue ahead of the feathers, then.

Is there a blade that stands out as a great go-to for a rookie who shaves nearly daily and who's been shaving with crap all his life? :blush:
I'm still a noob to DE shaving and began with a Merkur 34c (short-handled version of your 38c). It is quite a mild razor. During my learning curve, I had no problems with any of the blades on your list (although I did wait a couple of weeks to try the Feathers). Just remember to let the razor do the work (NO PRESSURE) and take your time.
Of course, you still might want to invest $1 in a styptic pencil. :yesnod:
 
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I have a Merkur 38C HD en route, along with some other accouterments to get me started:

  • Taylor of Old Bond Street Shaving Cream Bowl, Sandalwood (wood sounded manly)
  • Proraso shaving kit (pre/post cream, shaving cream, aftershave balm)
  • Proraso aftershave (not an aftershave guy, but will try it)
  • Astra Superior Platinum sample
  • Feather Double-Edged sample
  • Personna sample
  • Wilkerson sample
  • Trying some 'Shave secret' oil either pre-shave or a few drops in the cream as I lather it up

Still unsettled on a brush. I also saw a SWEET bowl/scuttle/whatever it is called, so still looking around for something that speaks to me, but I am at least on the path to conversion. :)


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The thing about a badger or a boar or a horse brush is that no matter how long you use it, it is going to leave a residual scent of the animal that is highly pronounced at the beginning. In time it fades, but it is always there, and I don't find it a pleasant smell.

That's why I prefer synthetic brushes. You can get a decent brush. But if part of the shaving experience is knowing that an animal died for your shave. Then to each his own. While I'm not against using animals for our own use, I don't think it's cool too use a animal solely for it's pelt.

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You know, it's interesting to me how straight-razor shaving is always talked about as the epitome of manliness, and to be fair, shaving old-school with a blade that COULD EASILY KILL YOU, requiring careful skill and respect for the tools, is pretty damn manly.

But I find it to be both very masculine and quite feminine at the same time - after all, you're spending half an hour in the bathroom in a self-care ritual involving hot towels and luxurious skin-care products, that leaves you feeling self-confident and more attractive, with baby-smooth skin.

Call me a heretic if you will, but for me, it's best of both worlds. :)
 
You know, it's interesting to me how straight-razor shaving is always talked about as the epitome of manliness, and to be fair, shaving old-school with a blade that COULD EASILY KILL YOU, requiring careful skill and respect for the tools, is pretty damn manly.

But I find it to be both very masculine and quite feminine at the same time - after all, you're spending half an hour in the bathroom in a self-care ritual involving hot towels and luxurious skin-care products, that leaves you feeling self-confident and more attractive, with baby-smooth skin.

Call me a heretic if you will, but for me, it's best of both worlds. :)
Maybe you know women who shave their faces, I personally do not know any. So maybe you are right.

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That's a whole 'nother topic, but a lot of women have a little facial hair. Some bleach it to be less noticeable, some wax it, I do know one who has tried shaving it, and another who just rolls with it, Frida Kahlo style. The women I've met on the B&B shaving forums are talking about shaving their legs though, as far as I recall.
 
Maybe you know women who shave their faces, I personally do not know any. So maybe you are right.

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I dont know....... I saw a couple women shaving mustaches videos on youtube. needless to say I didnt click on them.

I'm currently going through a 100 of the derby premiums and like them.......but I'm now only on my second pack of 5's. at their price though, I could justly change blades daily. right now for me I'm guessing 3 shaves per blade......but will know more when I've burned through some. at least blades are not expensive so I can jump ship without guilt.

merkur 1904 open comb on the way.

camo
 
You know, it's interesting to me how straight-razor shaving is always talked about as the epitome of manliness, and to be fair, shaving old-school with a blade that COULD EASILY KILL YOU, requiring careful skill and respect for the tools, is pretty damn manly.

But I find it to be both very masculine and quite feminine at the same time - after all, you're spending half an hour in the bathroom in a self-care ritual involving hot towels and luxurious skin-care products, that leaves you feeling self-confident and more attractive, with baby-smooth skin.

Call me a heretic if you will, but for me, it's best of both worlds. :)
...only back to say, touché, sir. Touché. :)

However, I would argue that anything could sound, as you say, "feminine," if you laden your portrayal with (excuse the pun) flowery language; but let's be honest, Lev. We're dragging steel blades forged with blood, sweat, and tears across a slick, snot-like surface that was applied with, and still smells like, roadkill and the hair of dead animals, followed by dousing our skin with a masochistic tonic that feels like thousands of stinging needles that brings lesser men to their knees, wincing in pain.

(I will confess, however. I received the TOBS sandlewood tub, opened it up, and the smell did send a tingle to the lower extremities...but blaming it on the wood (pun intended)).
 
I'm new too. welcome to the adventure.

my very first tub of proraso red soap and AS arrived before I went out to dinner last night.

wow.

that sandalwood concoction had lather galore. even on the trip back I could smell both on me.

good luck with the learning.
The Proraso 'before dinner cocktail'. Nice. Welcome to B&B.
 
The thing about a badger or a boar or a horse brush is that no matter how long you use it, it is going to leave a residual scent of the animal that is highly pronounced at the beginning. In time it fades, but it is always there, and I don't find it a pleasant smell.

That's why I prefer synthetic brushes. You can get a decent brush. But if part of the shaving experience is knowing that an animal died for your shave. Then to each his own. While I'm not against using animals for our own use, I don't think it's cool too use a animal solely for it's pelt.

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I believe most of the Badger Hair is coming from China. And I think, but I am not positive, that in China they eat the Badger for food.
 
The thing about a badger or a boar or a horse brush is that no matter how long you use it, it is going to leave a residual scent of the animal that is highly pronounced at the beginning. In time it fades, but it is always there, and I don't find it a pleasant smell.

That's why I prefer synthetic brushes. You can get a decent brush. But if part of the shaving experience is knowing that an animal died for your shave. Then to each his own. While I'm not against using animals for our own use, I don't think it's cool too use a animal solely for it's pelt.

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Sorry you may be misguided on things.

NOTHING beats the water and lather retention of a BADGER brush. The softness is so wonderful its like rubbing your face on a 2 week old kittens tummy. LUXURY at its finest.

Like the best barbeque in the world followed by a bit of 40 year old johnny walker black label. Its perfection.

How much leather products do you own?
 
This is mostly a place that just focuses on shaving (with the exception of the barbershop and various clubhouse-oriented sections). Just keep in mind you'll find a variety of political orientations on the forum and a variety of lifestyles.
This.
Let’s make sure everyone feels welcome to share in our enjoyment of this hobby.
Thanks FireDragon76.




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