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Time for a new watch

Rhody

I'm a Lumberjack.
I'm finally at a place in life where I could afford just about any watch I want. Lol, IF the War Department approves the allocation of funds, that is..... but: now that I CAN afford one I find that I really just want quartz.
Why?

LOL! Because I can buy MORE watches! It'll be hard having to listen to her yell at me, but........ I'm worth it!!!
A quartz watch is cheaper than a divorce attorney. Plus you can look at your phone for the time 😁😂😎
Or better yet can you still call the operator and ask for the correct time? You could try that.
Or just buy a watch and make sure you intercept the mail when it arrives and then hide it and peak at it when she’s not around. 🤣
 

FarmerTan

FarmerStan the Man
A quartz watch is cheaper than a divorce attorney. Plus you can look at your phone for the time 😁😂😎
Or better yet can you still call the operator and ask for the correct time? You could try that.
Or just buy a watch and make sure you intercept the mail when it arrives and then hide it and peak at it when she’s not around. 🤣
Brother.....you been watching me through my cell phone?!?

You've just described our life in vivid color!
You've made me think of the NBC Peacock! True story doggone!
 

Rhody

I'm a Lumberjack.
Brother.....you been watching me through my cell phone?!?

You've just described our life in vivid color!
You've made me think of the NBC Peacock! True story doggone!
Better reception through the quartz watch actually.
Watching you? I’m not saying it’s aliens but it’s definitely 👽
 
Slim :
1. Was that seiko 385 retail because street price on most Seikos is 15-30% of retail easily.

2. Assembling your own watch for 161.00 (the sum of all the materials listed above) is certainly a wonderful endeavor but value is not one of them. For 200ish, you could get a Orient Kamasu (dive) or an Orient dress model for 160 ish and have a warranty.

3. You cost of materials presumes no other tools needed and no parts damage when you assembly the watch.

4. To repeat, as an endeavor, self watch making is a noble thing and most respectful. As a value proposition...not so much.
At least not in this financial/feature space.
I come up with $155 with tools, but I’m nowhere near fully caffeinated.

Those parts are what I put in my fleabay cart in a five minute search. I may be able to cut that down, not sure. It’s still quite a bit less than $385. Also, I think I would like the process of assembling my own unique watch (similar to others sure, but not exactly like them). I checked high and low for a better price on the Seiko I was lusting after and couldn’t do better than $195 for a used one that had a suspicious looking “piece of lint or glare” on the edge of its crystal.

There are companies that sell watchmaking kits, but none have the look I want for less than $350. At that point I would definitely choose to spend the extra $35.

It’s all moot though because it was pointed out to me (rather forcefully) that I have other more pressing financial responsibilities for the present.
 
You might want to scan the listings on AliExpress, ebay, and similar places. Where you can find many variants including homages such as the 62mas, Willard using the NH35 movement. There was a few hundred page long thread on another watch forum of mostly satisfied buyers, but I don't recall exactly which AliExpress brands/stores were most recommended but I think "Steeldive" was one of them. I mention all that as another way to spend a similar amount for a prebuilt watch.

Just one example listing...I am not recommending this watch one way or the other, as I know very little about it:
 
About six months ago, as a time piece for work and crafting at home that saves my good Tissot watch from scratches, I chose an inexpensive but fairly decent Casio Wave Ceptor. It features a light but water-proof titanium case and bracelet with a safety-lock folding clasp, a perspex crystal, an anthracite grey dial, illuminating hands and dial indices and a plethora of functions such as a multiband radio signal receiver, which sets the correct time automatically, 29 cities from which to chose the 24 time zones, five alarms, a count-down timer, a chrongraph (stop watch), date and day display, a dial illumination and some more. It is a quartz watch, of course, and its battery is powered by solar energy. As long as it is exposed to light, it will keep running forever. When the battery is fully charged, it has a power reserve of several months even in absolute darkness. The bracelet is easy to adjust to individual wrist size thanks to the quick-adjust tool that comes with the watch. So, the Wave Ceptor fits well on an average male's wrist and is very comfortable to wear. The case is pressure-proof up to 10 bar, and no, that does NOT mean that you can dive down to 330 ft. or 100 m with that time piece on your wrist without risking to destroy it. ;) 10 bar pressure-proof just means that the watch will probably survive everyday exposure to water, e. g. in the shower, bath tub, swimming pool and perhaps a bit of snorkeling.

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Well, I spent a fair amount (for me) for a Citizen tough solar titanium watch. I like a lighter watch, no winding, and surprisingly good accuracy. Mine is a UK-only version. Not sure why some companies restrict some models to certain markets. Lots of Japan-only watches from several manufacturers, some I find more desireable than what are sent to the US.
I do think it’s pretty foolish to spend much money on a wristwatch. I guess I’m just set in my ways. Well,at least I’m not stupid like Rolex buyers.

Jack
 
I do think it’s pretty foolish to spend much money on a wristwatch. I guess I’m just set in my ways. Well,at least I’m not stupid like Rolex buyers.
I don't own a Rolex watch or any other luxury-brand time piece, but I find it quite arrogant and narrow-minded to label Rolex owners as foolish or stupid. I know quite a few people who wear Rolex watches and I can assure you that they are very intelligent, successful people, and most of them are friendly, open-minded, helpful and generous. Perhaps it's about time for you to work on your own mindset, your stereotypes and prejudices.
 
Well, I spent a fair amount (for me) for a Citizen tough solar titanium watch. I like a lighter watch, no winding, and surprisingly good accuracy. Mine is a UK-only version. Not sure why some companies restrict some models to certain markets. Lots of Japan-only watches from several manufacturers, some I find more desireable than what are sent to the US.
I do think it’s pretty foolish to spend much money on a wristwatch. I guess I’m just set in my ways. Well,at least I’m not stupid like Rolex buyers.

Jack
I've owned two Rolexes over the years. Paid $950 for one, $1200 for the other. When I sold them, they netted me well into five figures. So my net cost of ownership was zero; and in fact, I made money, all the while having the pleasure and prestige of wearing the watches.

So this makes me stupid? How?

I should add here that I'm also a Citizen fan; I have, I think, twenty or twenty-five of them, all merrily ticking away in the sunlight. I'm wearing one now that sports a petrol blue dial, radial flip numerals and a PVD blackout case. Very cool.

Will they appreciate the way my Rolexes did? Doubtful. But I bought them for fun, not profit. And I'm into having fun.
 
Obviously I need to clarify myself. I do feel like many Rolex purchasers are foolish to a degree. While Rolexes are well made and accurate, I don’t feel they are worth nearly the price they bring, whether retail or even more. The main advantage Rolexes have over many other excellent timekeepers is brand recognition. Thanks to the millions Rolex has spent on advertising, everyone knows Rolex, and many feel the brand is the epitome of watchmaking. There are many watchmaking firms whose products are at least as good as Rolex, and far finer finished. If I had the funds for a really fine wristwatch, my options would be broad.
I did have a couple of opportunities to purchase a Rolex years ago before prices went crazy. Had I done so, I would certainly be selling it on, taking my profit, and buying something from a smaller manufacturer.
Maybe it’s just me, but I refuse to pay retail or above for things, particularly when other attractive alternatives exist.
Jack
 
I agree with many of your points, particularly on how well Rolex manages its brand. Rolex may not be the epitome of horology, but it is among the kings of marketing. Witness how Rolex is cracking down on ADs who are charging well above the MSRP. We should all have such problems.

* * *

Also, I'll spend all day online to avoid paying retail for even the most trivial stuff. Then, if the deal is good enough, I'll end up buying too much.:ohmy:
 
I haven’tbeen keeping up with much on the watch front for some time. If Rolex is trying to crack down on people overcharging for their products, that is a very good thing. One of the reasons Rolex costs asmuch as they do is that they keep their production numbers down to avoid an oversupply. I guess it’s a pretty fine line to walk, keeping supplies down to keep prices up, while keeping others from exploiting the scarcity by overcharging. I’d say Rolex needs to increase production slightly.
Jack
 
I think no one would venture so far to say Rolex is Haute Horlogerie. They are good working pieces but nobody wants to see their movements through a glass back. And yes they overcharge for their brand recognition. That being said they do keep their value as @Whilliam eluded. As long as they raise their prices every year between 8-10% they help a healthy secondary market.

In regards to volume, Rolex produces constantly over all lines close to 1,000,000 watches a year yet never enough of the sought after steel Sporties and there is even a squeeze for bread and butter Datejusts. Years ago there was the Panerai craze with an annual total production of 50,000 pieces and 3,500 pieces per model. Compared to this a Rolex is easy peasy to obtain :)

Where do my ramblings lead…

Nobody has to play their game but buying, using and selling at cost or even a premium works only with Rolex or Patek. I would be hard pressed to find anything else that you can use every day without any devaluation for a longer period of time and with only minimal costs for upkeep and storage.
 
Obviously I need to clarify myself. I do feel like many Rolex purchasers are foolish to a degree. While Rolexes are well made and accurate, I don’t feel they are worth nearly the price they bring, whether retail or even more. The main advantage Rolexes have over many other excellent timekeepers is brand recognition. Thanks to the millions Rolex has spent on advertising, everyone knows Rolex, and many feel the brand is the epitome of watchmaking. There are many watchmaking firms whose products are at least as good as Rolex, and far finer finished. If I had the funds for a really fine wristwatch, my options would be broad.
I did have a couple of opportunities to purchase a Rolex years ago before prices went crazy. Had I done so, I would certainly be selling it on, taking my profit, and buying something from a smaller manufacturer.
Maybe it’s just me, but I refuse to pay retail or above for things, particularly when other attractive alternatives exist.
Jack
As my dad taught me, an item's worth sits at the nexus wherein the price someone is willing to pay for it meets the price for which someone is willing to sell it. No more, no less.
 
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