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THE THIN BLUE SMOKE THREAD XII

martym

I Leave The Toilet Seat Up.
Contributor
Contributor
57° outside!
Listening to Intocable and Ramon Ayala
(Beer drinking music for the ranch but it works well for bbq’ing too.)

All is perfect for firing up the pit

Doing a whole boneless turkey breast
2 Dino Ribs
2 burger patties
5 pounds of mollejas (sweetbreads)
A 20lb brisket

We are preparing for the work week knowing that one or both of us will be forced to work at least 1 double shift this week and possibly 2.But that’s okay because that’s what we signed up for.

I almost pulled the trigger on a Wagyu brisket but $146 for a 20lb brisket was too much for me to comprehend so I bought the Prime brisket for 1/2 the price.
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We're moving to a place with a proper back yard soon (closing is late May), so I'm thinking of investing in a pellet grill...my girlfriend loves barbecue, but she keeps kosher, and the only kosher BBQ place we knew of (which was in New York, so we only could go like once a year anyways) closed down a while back, so she's been BBQ-less for quite a while.

Anyone have suggestions for good smoking recipes for a beginner? The one caveat is it has to be kosher, so no pork. If anyone has suggestions for recipes for beef ribs or chicken in particular, I'd be particularly interested. (I grew up in the South, so I miss my BBQ chicken, and my girlfriend really misses the beef ribs from that kosher BBQ place.)

I almost pulled the trigger on a Wagyu brisket but $146 for a 20lb brisket was too much for me to comprehend so I bought the Prime brisket for 1/2 the price.
$146 for a 20 pound brisket seems so cheap when you keep kosher. Kosher brisket is more like $20 a pound. (Admittedly, that's for a really nice, grass-fed brisket, but one way or another kosher meat is just crazy expensive.)
 

simon1

Self Ignored by Vista
Anyone have suggestions for good smoking recipes for a beginner? The one caveat is it has to be kosher, so no pork. If anyone has suggestions for recipes for beef ribs or chicken in particular, I'd be particularly interested. (I grew up in the South, so I miss my BBQ chicken, and my girlfriend really misses the beef ribs from that kosher BBQ place.)
You should be over run with suggestions after awhile. I usually do beef ribs by removing the membrane, shaking a good layer of kosher salt, pepper, garlic powder, and a bit of paprika on the meat. Then throw in the smoker until done. Beef ribs take longer than pork ribs. I never sauce ribs or anything else while they are smoking...I let the wood do the flavoring. Ribs are easy.

Something like this.


Chicken is also easy. Just season with the rub of your choice and smoke for about 1-1 1/2 hours at 225.

 

martym

I Leave The Toilet Seat Up.
Contributor
Contributor
For steaks I just use salt and pepper.
For everything else I use either Season All or nothing at all.
 

TexLaw

Fussy Evil Genius
Contributor
Anyone have suggestions for good smoking recipes for a beginner? The one caveat is it has to be kosher, so no pork. If anyone has suggestions for recipes for beef ribs or chicken in particular, I'd be particularly interested. (I grew up in the South, so I miss my BBQ chicken, and my girlfriend really misses the beef ribs from that kosher BBQ place.)
That beef ribs recipe that @simon1 posted looks pretty good!

For chicken, I like to brine it and smoke it hot. I'll buy whole chickens, pull off the skin, and break them down into quarters (sometimes also halving the breasts), and brine overnight (my favorite brine is Alton Brown's orange juice brine--below). Then, I smoke them hot (around 350F) until the breasts are 163F internal (carryover should take care of the rest. The thighs and legs should be done properly by that time, as well). That always comes out nice and juicy. The orange juice brine is a bit of trouble, but it really adds a nice, subtle flavor. You can do the same thing with whole chickens (or a whole turkey or turkey parts). I brine them either in gallon-sized Ziploc baggies or a food grade plastic bucket.

(Some folks love leaving the skins on, but I don't like what brining does to skins. When brining, you won't miss the skin.) I save the backs and skins for stock.)

If you want your Souther "BBQ chicken," that's just grilled chicken where you slather on your favorite BBQ sauce at some point while cooking. When you slather it on is a matter of how cooked and charred you want the sauce to be. I prefer my smoked chicken, but I admit that I also have a special place in my heart for this stuff. Brining doesn't hurt here, either, but you probably can save time and effort with a much simpler, basic brine.

You always have your brisket. Ask a 10 guys how to cook a brisket, and you're likely to get 15 answers. Personally, I rub with kosher salt, freshly ground black pepper, and a little garlic powder (or Texas BBQ Rub), cook it on the pit at around 225-250F until it's around 260-265 in the thick part of the flat (or until I get tired of the stall), wrap it in foil (folks seem to love pink butcher paper, these days, but I still like foil), and take it to 190-200F (around 190F if I know I am going to freeze and reheat; 200F if I am just going to hold it and eat soon). I'll add a little coarsely (but not too coarse) ground cumin and/or coriander to the rub when I'm in the mood. It takes all day to cook, and it's done when it's done. However, the good thing about getting a pellet cooker is that you can start it the night before and let it take care of things while you sleep. Just be sure you have enough pellets for the time you want to snooze.

Other beef roasts do very well on a pit or pellet cooker. I've cooked chuck roasts, top round, and (the king of all) rib roasts. Essentially, you just rub those with whatever you like cook them around 250F until they reach the internal temperature that you desire.

Here's that brine:

Alton Brown Orange Juice Brine

1 qt vegetable stock, chilled (regular, not low sodium - that's important)
1/2 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup dark brown sugar
1 tsp black peppercorns (I usually use more like 1 tbsp, but I like pepper)
2 bay leaves
1 qt. orange juice, chilled
2 qts. ice water

Bring 2 cups of the stock, the salt, brown sugar, peppercorns, and bay leaves to a boil. Dissolve the sugar and salt, and cut the fire. Add in the remaining stock, orange juice, and ice water. Once the brine has cooled to 40F or under, add the meat and keep in a cold place (under 40F). Brine for 8-48 hours.

This is enough for 2 chickens, one turkey, one pork butt, or about one whole pork loin. For chickens, I like to skin and cut into quarters. You can fit one chicken's worth of quarters in a one gallon Ziplock baggie with enough room for brine. If I don't use the Ziplock baggies, I put everything in a food grade plastic bucket.

I regularly leave meat in this brine overnight with great results, and I do not hesitate to leave it over two nights.
 

martym

I Leave The Toilet Seat Up.
Contributor
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We’re just throwing on some chicken thighs and Angus Burger patties. I already cooked the weeks lunches during my last two days off. Now a quick dinner for tonight and leftovers all week for work. I have a couple of double shifts this week. Yuck!
 

oc_in_fw

Fridays are Fishtastic!
Contributor
On vacation next week, I will be firing up the grill. I will likely do a pork shoulder, and definitely rib eyes. I have to atone for Easter, when I char-broiled about $100 worth of meat. I have no idea what happened, but it was a bad flare up that I didn’t notice and never had happen before. I was a bit torqued off.
 
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