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The Muhle R41 compared to my vintage razors (part 2).

Last week I wanted to share my thoughts on a famed aggressive DE razor, the R41, compared to my collection of vintage bakelite and polymere razors. Most of these are quite aggressive and very effective, yet easy to use.
For reasons I still do not understand, the "R41" I used turned out to have a base plate similar to the Piccolo. Some kind members pointed this out to me. You can imagine my embarrassment and understand I had to order the correct base plate and use the real R41 and share my thoughts again.

I will keep it short. The notorious R41 is no match for most of my bakelite and polymer vintage razors. Not only do they combine aggressive design with very smooth and effective shaving: they are much easier to manouvre.
I often wondered why most of these razors are much more aggressive than most modern DE razors. It may well be people were better shavers in these days (1930 to 1950), since there had no cartridge razors to start their shaving life. Maybe some members would like to share their thoughts on this?

While the result of the shave with the R41 was good, the shave itself was rough. The razor tugged. A lot. I read many members mentioning this. That's why I loaded a sharp blade. And tried two different soaps, with no noticable difference. The shave was really uncomfortable.

I'm not trying to dismiss the Muhle R41. Many seem to enjoy this monumental razor. But it clearly is not for me.
Taking in to account most of my vintage, many in NOS condition, were dirt cheap, I would like to urge those thinking about a next step in exploring more aggressive razors to consider looking at a bakelite or polymer vintage.

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I find the stock R41 to be rough and aggressive. Lots of tugging. I always feel like I am on the verge of slicing myself. The blade chatter is so bad you can almost feel the blade wiggling as you shave. Change the top cap to something like the Yintal Bronze, or the Razorock SLOC top cap, and the R41 becomes the BBS monster the legends speak about. The blade clamping improves, the tugging stops, and the shave becomes smooth. But it stays at max efficiency. There is much written on here about the benefits of swapping caps on the R41. This is all with the 2013 and newer model. The 2011 model is just a beast and is too rough for me. I am leaving on a road trip today, and I’m taking my R41 with the Yintal cap with me… for High Efficiency June.
 

thombrogan

Lounging On The Isle Of Tugsley.
The Mühle 2013-R41 (well, its head) was my first non-cartridge safety razor. I watched videos, joined B&B, and read up on it like it would be the be-all/end-all instead of it being a safety razor.

@Nacp mentioned I’d probably have better luck with a Fatip OC or RazoRock JAWS and he was so right. As you’ve experienced, @Jack Goossen , vintage, Bakelite slants would’ve even been better.

The 2013-R41 can do a great job, but it avoids the whiskers on my jawline and leaving me with the feeling I have super tough whiskers and sensitive skin. In contrast, every slant razor I’ve used (PAA el Fantasma, Ikon X3, RazoRock “German” 37) treats them like finely spun sugar and only arboreally-scented soaps make my skin feel sensitive.
 
Last week I wanted to share my thoughts on a famed aggressive DE razor, the R41, compared to my collection of vintage bakelite and polymere razors. Most of these are quite aggressive and very effective, yet easy to use.
For reasons I still do not understand, the "R41" I used turned out to have a base plate similar to the Piccolo. Some kind members pointed this out to me. You can imagine my embarrassment and understand I had to order the correct base plate and use the real R41 and share my thoughts again.

I will keep it short. The notorious R41 is no match for most of my bakelite and polymer vintage razors. Not only do they combine aggressive design with very smooth and effective shaving: they are much easier to manouvre.
I often wondered why most of these razors are much more aggressive than most modern DE razors. It may well be people were better shavers in these days (1930 to 1950), since there had no cartridge razors to start their shaving life. Maybe some members would like to share their thoughts on this?

While the result of the shave with the R41 was good, the shave itself was rough. The razor tugged. A lot. I read many members mentioning this. That's why I loaded a sharp blade. And tried two different soaps, with no noticable difference. The shave was really uncomfortable.

I'm not trying to dismiss the Muhle R41. Many seem to enjoy this monumental razor. But it clearly is not for me.
Taking in to account most of my vintage, many in NOS condition, were dirt cheap, I would like to urge those thinking about a next step in exploring more aggressive razors to consider looking at a bakelite or polymer vintage.

View attachment 1466251
which bakelite or polymer vintage ones are good to look out for? thanks
 
which bakelite or polymer vintage ones are good to look out for? thanks
Fasan, obviously, but also Nellite. Wardonia is excellent, but you'll have to round the razor posts with a bit of wet/dry paper, or pop off the holding tabs on a modern blade for one to fit. I have heard, but have not experienced, that Phoenix Artisan Accoutrements re-makes of several classic bakelite & polymer/plastic shavers are excellent, and very reasonable.
 
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Last week I wanted to share my thoughts on a famed aggressive DE razor, the R41, compared to my collection of vintage bakelite and polymere razors. Most of these are quite aggressive and very effective, yet easy to use.
For reasons I still do not understand, the "R41" I used turned out to have a base plate similar to the Piccolo. Some kind members pointed this out to me. You can imagine my embarrassment and understand I had to order the correct base plate and use the real R41 and share my thoughts again.

I will keep it short. The notorious R41 is no match for most of my bakelite and polymer vintage razors. Not only do they combine aggressive design with very smooth and effective shaving: they are much easier to manouvre.
I often wondered why most of these razors are much more aggressive than most modern DE razors. It may well be people were better shavers in these days (1930 to 1950), since there had no cartridge razors to start their shaving life. Maybe some members would like to share their thoughts on this?

While the result of the shave with the R41 was good, the shave itself was rough. The razor tugged. A lot. I read many members mentioning this. That's why I loaded a sharp blade. And tried two different soaps, with no noticable difference. The shave was really uncomfortable.

I'm not trying to dismiss the Muhle R41. Many seem to enjoy this monumental razor. But it clearly is not for me.
Taking in to account most of my vintage, many in NOS condition, were dirt cheap, I would like to urge those thinking about a next step in exploring more aggressive razors to consider looking at a bakelite or polymer vintage.

View attachment 1466251
Loved reading the threads you wrote on this! Any chance you could show us a picture of your bakelight collection?
 
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