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The Last Movie You Watched?

Sunset Boulevard. Free on Prime. I have to admire Swanson, and other silent actresses. How many actresses then or now would let DeMille put them in a cage with a lion? Nowadays, it's all CGI or stand-ins. Paid millions, but they can't risk messing up hair or makeup, or having a plastic part deflate.

Favorite lines:
"If you need help with the coffin, let me know."
"I AM big. It's the pictures that got small."
"We didn't need dialogue. We had faces."
 

emwolf

Contributor
Sunset Boulevard. Free on Prime. I have to admire Swanson, and other silent actresses. How many actresses then or now would let DeMille put them in a cage with a lion? Nowadays, it's all CGI or stand-ins. Paid millions, but they can't risk messing up hair or makeup, or having a plastic part deflate.

Favorite lines:
"If you need help with the coffin, let me know."
"I AM big. It's the pictures that got small."
"We didn't need dialogue. We had faces."
one of my all-time favorite movies, sick and twisted beyond the era in which it was made. I have to admire Swanson for allowing herself to play her age at the time, that was gutsy. As far as the silent stars, yes, there were lots of near fatal shots. I'll never forget the absolutely thrilling ice floe chase in Way Down East
 
Rented and watched, "Alien: Covenant" today. Being an avid "Alien" fan from the late 70's I thought I'd give ole Ridley another chance after "Prometheus". Not interesting in the least! I'm not going to spoil anything but shoot it wasn't what I was expecting at all.

Next up is "Godzilla vs. The Smog Monster" on VHS (only format they had), which is bound to be more entertaining. lol
 

emwolf

Contributor
Flypaper (2011) Not a lot of expectations going into a movie that has Ashley Judd, but I really enjoyed this heist comedy. Great cast with lots of twists along the way.
 

emwolf

Contributor
Tom Brown's School Days, decent adaptation of the classic, very Hollywood, and can't compare to the masterpiece theater version from the 70s. Makes me want to rewatch Royal Flash
 
Jason and the Argonauts - 1963. (Blu-ray). Yesterday I watched an old dvd of It Came From Beneath The Sea, which I saw in the movies as a kid. I also watched The Harryhausen Chronicles documentary on that disc. With my wife out of the house today, I watched Jason, with the Harryhausen commentary sound track. It's one of my top 10 films of all-time. Except for the 1st Jurassic Park, I'll take a stop-motion film over CGI any time. Showing my age, CGI has become so phony, it's unwatchable.
 
Sunset Boulevard. Free on Prime. I have to admire Swanson, and other silent actresses. How many actresses then or now would let DeMille put them in a cage with a lion? Nowadays, it's all CGI or stand-ins. Paid millions, but they can't risk messing up hair or makeup, or having a plastic part deflate.

Favorite lines:
"If you need help with the coffin, let me know."
"I AM big. It's the pictures that got small."
"We didn't need dialogue. We had faces."
I think I've commented this before. But one of the best elements in the film is William Holden's narration. He speaks in a hushed voice throughout, like someone talking on the telephone who does not want to be overheard in the next room. It -- along with the dimly lit rooms of Norma's mansion -- gives the film a claustrophobic quality.
 

emwolf

Contributor
The Chase with Robert Cummings and Peter Lorre, based on a Cornell Woolrich story. Not great, but very serviceable. Both Joel McRea and Robert Cummings are favorite leads for me. They have that classic American everyman feel for me.
 
The Chase with Robert Cummings and Peter Lorre, based on a Cornell Woolrich story. Not great, but very serviceable. Both Joel McRea and Robert Cummings are favorite leads for me. They have that classic American everyman feel for me.
I just saw that one about a month ago. YooToob has been a great source of entertainment for me.
 
On Saturday night, Circle of Danger from 1951 on YooToob. Ray Milland plays an American come to England to discover how and why his brother, a 1940 volunteer for the British army, died -- the only casualty -- in a 1944 commando mission. The film is less a thriller (though see below) than it is a detective story, as he tracks the survivors of the war who served with his brother and pieces their stories together. Adding to the fun is a romance with an attractive lady author (Patricia Roc). The film, an original script by detective-story author Philip MacDonald, is colorful and vivid, with flashes of humor and glimpses of several walks of life in postwar Britain: coal miners in Wales, a comfortable family estate in Scotland, a "sharp as a weasel" used-car salesman, and a ballet director (Marcus Goring in a fluttery, elfin turn) who turns out to be crucial to the plot.

The final 10 minutes are thrilling, however, as we wonder if Milland's character is going to make out of all this. And there is a twist to the final revelation as well. Worth seeing.
 

emwolf

Contributor
On Saturday night, Circle of Danger from 1951 on YooToob. Ray Milland plays an American come to England to discover how and why his brother, a 1940 volunteer for the British army, died -- the only casualty -- in a 1944 commando mission. The film is less a thriller (though see below) than it is a detective story, as he tracks the survivors of the war who served with his brother and pieces their stories together. Adding to the fun is a romance with an attractive lady author (Patricia Roc). The film, an original script by detective-story author Philip MacDonald, is colorful and vivid, with flashes of humor and glimpses of several walks of life in postwar Britain: coal miners in Wales, a comfortable family estate in Scotland, a "sharp as a weasel" used-car salesman, and a ballet director (Marcus Goring in a fluttery, elfin turn) who turns out to be crucial to the plot.

The final 10 minutes are thrilling, however, as we wonder if Milland's character is going to make out of all this. And there is a twist to the final revelation as well. Worth seeing.
well, I enjoy a good Ray Milland flick as well. Ministry of Fear is one of my favorites.
 
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