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The hobby in 10 years from now

Raven Koenes

Contributor
With that being said I think D/E shaving (or Straight or S/E) will slow down or decrease as the "Baby Boomers" die off (me included). Because we are the last generation who many of us actually first started shaving with the D/E razors. So to us it was more of a ritual or a "becoming of age" as we look back so I think at least for me it has more sentimental value. Just my opinion.
I agree with this statement.
I've converted two Millennials to DE shaving, and I just built a shave kit and gave it to my Generation Z grandson. He has been waiting for me to give him a kit because his mom told me to wait until he turned 18. He's watching Nick Shaves how to videos and will report back. I gave my grandson a Muhle r89, a Razorock Bruce Plissoft, Fine American Blend Shaving Soap, a mug, an assortment of blades, and Pinaud Clubman Original. The two Millennial kids love it, and one just hunted down a Mk1 Fatip on his own. The kids are looking for direction without being told. If it looks cool maybe it is. I'll I had to do was make them aware of possibilities.
 
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They already have home laser hair removal and IPL that's FDA approved. Of course this is a relatively permanent solution and not at all painless.
And also don't forget all laser applications
Used on humans comes with it's own set
Of risk and/or side effects. The eye laser
surgery has been around for Decades and
Has yet too for fill it's promise to eliminate
Eye glasses or contact lens for all qualifying conditions and it assumed
Everyone with the option for laser would
Choose it.
 
And also don't forget all laser applications
Used on humans comes with it's own set
Of risk and/or side effects. The eye laser
surgery has been around for Decades and
Has yet too for fill it's promise to eliminate
Eye glasses or contact lens for all qualifying conditions and it assumed
Everyone with the option for laser would
Choose it.
I had a few family members that did that and mostly they regret it because their vision has suffered.

IPL and laser hair removal have a more proven track record with known risks, but it's semi-permanent in men and you won't grow a decent beard back in years, if at all.
 

Ice-Man

Moderator
Naw I will keep my stubble on my chin, I want to keep shaving just think no 5 oclock shadow. We would be getting called the milky bar kid as smooth as a babys bum... :lol1: :lol1: :lol1: :lol1:
 
Naw I will keep my stubble on my chin, I want to keep shaving just think no 5 oclock shadow. We would be getting called the milky bar kid as smooth as a babys bum... :lol1: :lol1: :lol1: :lol1:
I got IPL and laser back in my early 30's. For a while I was BBS. It eventually grew back, though my shadow isn't quite as heavy and it's a little patchy. But if you were dedicated to it for life, it would be competitive in cost with shaving.


Women that get laser usually experience more permanent results due to lack of testosterone.
 
I haven't read the thread, but nothing has really changed in 10 years. A few artisans exist, artisans existed 10 years ago.
 
I've converted two Millennials to DE shaving, and I just built a shave kit and gave it to my Generation Z grandson. He has been waiting for me to give him a kit because his mom told me to wait until he turned 18. He's watching Nick Shaves how to videos and will report back. I gave my grandson a Muhle r89, a Razorock Bruce Plissoft, Fine American Blend Shaving Soap, a mug, an assortment of blades, and Pinaud Clubman Original. The two Millennial kids love it, and one just hunted down a Mk1 Fatip on his own. The kids are looking for direction without being told. If it looks cool maybe it is. I'll I had to do was make them aware of possibilities.
Good man!! It is great to pass on the knowledge and the craft of traditional wet shaving!! :a14: :a14: :a14:
 
I suspect my beard will grow also in 10 years from now. So, nothing will change for me.

For the hobby in general? I don't know, but I suspect even more professional commercialism than even now (which exploded IMHO the last few years).
 

naughtilus

Contributor
I've converted two Millennials to DE shaving, and I just built a shave kit and gave it to my Generation Z grandson. He has been waiting for me to give him a kit because his mom told me to wait until he turned 18. He's watching Nick Shaves how to videos and will report back. I gave my grandson a Muhle r89, a Razorock Bruce Plissoft, Fine American Blend Shaving Soap, a mug, an assortment of blades, and Pinaud Clubman Original. The two Millennial kids love it, and one just hunted down a Mk1 Fatip on his own. The kids are looking for direction without being told. If it looks cool maybe it is. I'll I had to do was make them aware of possibilities.
Well done Rave. I've put it out there quite a bit but no takers so far. When I mention DE razors it conjures visions of bloodbath, pain and fear of even touching a DE blade. Straight razors at least are deemed cool via pop culture praise and the barbershop experience, while DEs are feared and hated cold metal torture devices. Plastic colorful light weight cartridges seem to be the people friendly version where a user never directly experiences the actual blades.
 

Raven Koenes

Contributor
Well done Rave. I've put it out there quite a bit but no takers so far. When I mention DE razors it conjures visions of bloodbath, pain and fear of even touching a DE blade. Straight razors at least are deemed cool via pop culture praise and the barbershop experience, while DEs are feared and hated cold metal torture devices. Plastic colorful light weight cartridges seem to be the people friendly version where a user never directly experiences the actual blades.
I find it's also not a very engaging topic, but if they are over at my house I find a way to show them my collection. That seems to work. Sometimes people humor me and go that's nice. Other times they get intrigued. My wife has even said to me why don't you show them your collection? Another thing, I do on subsequent visits, is show them something new that I got when they ask what I've been up to lol.
 
So funny how the age old optimist/pessimist battle rages on....

All through modern commercialism, there exists today a thriving underbelly of craft engagement of all kinds. The very same things that the pessimists will argue to be the downfall of our hobby, I think will encourage it. The internet, access to information, access to cheap production, ingredients, etc., all those things make artisan crafting of any kind easier, not harder. Add to that the Millenial/Gen Y/Gen Z proclivity for artisan crafts, and you have a recipe for a bright future. Just look at tatoos, craft beers, beard grooming product, even hipster boots. The list goes on and on.

Case in point - I'd like to see the traffic patterns and forum usage over the last 10 years. Maybe the Mods can get some analytics to show?

Now, here's some really fun stuff...

Safety Razor and Straight Razor interest today is way above where it was 15 years ago, in terms of interest. For the past 5 years, we've had a slight down turn, but we're still way above where we were in 2004:

Screen Shot 2019-10-22 at 9.56.10 AM.png

Fascinating that interest in Straight Razors is highest in Hungary, with the USA in the #2 spot. But for Safety Razor, interest is highest in Asia, and the USA is ranked 36th in interest.

Screen Shot 2019-10-22 at 10.02.10 AM.png

I used Worldwide geographic targeting, because this is a pretty international forum. But for those interested, the USA market closely resembles the worldwide trends...

Screen Shot 2019-10-22 at 10.03.26 AM.png

So what does all that mean? My read on this is that we have a slight downturn in the past 5 years, but corresponding to the rise of the iPhone, and web technology in general, we have seen a large increase in global and US domestic interest in safety razors and in straight razors. Since 2004/5 interest began to pick up, and is currently double or triple where it was...
 
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