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The Cult of Streamline - Streamline & Jewel owners

Here is mine. Razor is quite worn with base metal showing in the comb area but the stropper is virtually unused. Strop was missing but I picked up a second stropper and a strop from another seller over on Etsy for a decent price. The best of the ASR Gem blade razors for build quality but see below for additional comments.

I am going to be a bit of an iconoclast and note that I feel there were better razors made that could use Gem blades. I have both German Henckels Rapides and CV Heljestrand Swedish wedge blade safety razors that give outstanding shaves with Gem SS PTFE coated blades. Two of my CV Heljestrand razors are even stainless steel, a configuration that per the Waits Compendium does not exist but I have them and any members near Reno are welcome to stop by and see them. In perfect shape too after 80 years or so. BTW I also have a standard plated brass version of the CV Heljestrand too to compare with and am a hobbyist machinist so am almost totally certain of my material identification.

ERS-2.jpg ERS-1.jpg
 
I found two in the wild here in the US this past week.

I pulled out my scale and weighed them, one weighs 10 grams more than the other one. The difference is in the handle.

Slots in the guard Total 84.5 grams, handle 50.1 grams, head 34.4 grams.

No slots in guard Total 73.6 grams, handle 40.3 grams, head 33.3 grams.

One has one more tooth the the other.

Here is a picture of one of them, both are pretty mintish.

They are smooth and efficient.

IMAG0336_1_1.jpg IMAG0330.jpg
 
I thought I had posted this here, but I guess not. Here's a little write-up I did back in April 2017:

It's no secret, I've become a member of the "Streamline" cult. I've done a bit of research, so I thought I would share it here along with some images demonstrating the differences between the first generation and the second generation. I'll stipulate that the first generation are generally accepted to have been introduced in the 1930s and then re-released with some changes in the 1950s. These dates are estimates, and neither model has a date code.

My OCD dictates that I at least initially use parentheses to set off the moniker, "Streamline", because it's not necessarily correct. In fact, "Streamline" is more a reference to packaging than to the razor itself. Among others, the 30s and re-introduced 50s "Streamlines" were essentially named after their respective packaging/cases: "Ambassador", "Strop Outfit", "Jewel", and yes, "Streamline". Except for having either "Gem" or "Ever-Ready" embossing, the razors were the same, and only the packaging and accessories changed.

I won't go into the history of Ever-Ready and Gem (along with the overlap) as it's beyond the scope of this writing and there are plenty articles on the subject. Yet it is worth noting that in modern times, it's commonly believed that the "Jewel" was only with the "Gem" branding and that it was marketed to North America and, I think, Australia. That's a misconception as there are clearly shippers that show the "Jewel" to have the Ever-Ready branding. Particularly in the 2nd generation models, there's a lot of cross-over with regard to naming, packaging, and branding. In modern times, because the razors are all the same (and all made in England), we're at a loss as to what to call them because there's no way to prove the sets remain with their original accessories and packaging. Thus, it's generally accepted that calling the razor itself a "Streamline" identifies it.

As far as difference between 30s (1st gen) and 50s (2nd gen), the 30s were a little heavier, had a thicker neck, larger apertures, and closed grooves on the bar as opposed to the open slots of the 50s'. Additionally, the 30s had a notch on the back of the head where the 50s had a solid spine. In the case in which the razor was paired with a strop kit, the auto-strop on the first gen was devoid of text where the second gen had the following embossed: "Ever-Ready Pat Appld for - Made in England Automatic Stropper"

With regard to performance, I can speak with some authority on this as I have been using both models for about 2 months. The first gen gross weight is 82.8 grams (head is 33.4 and handle is 49.4). The second gen gross weight is 78.5 grams (head is 34.9 and the handle is 43.6). Frankly, I don't notice the 4 gram weight difference between the two as I'm using them. I do notice a significant decrease in blade feel when I go from the first gen to the second gen lending a slightly smoother shave yet no discernible sacrifice in efficiency. I wouldn't call either of these razors harsh, but the second gen has become my favorite in part because it's more forgiving. The other reason has to do with application. The solid bar along with larger apertures on the first gen seems to port the lather directly down the handle. The open slots on the second gen dispenses the lather right out the bottom of the head. In typical use, this may not be relevant. However, being a shower shaver, I do appreciate the lather being directed away from the handle. It's a small matter, but it does give more points to the second gen in my opinion.

I've only used modern Gem PTFE blades with these razors, and in theory, I may not be receiving the shave these razors offered in their day. There has been speculation that due to the thinner rib on modern rib-back blades, we get a slightly more aggressive shave than with the vintage blade. It was theorized that the thicker rib angled the blade downward slightly. It would be like "shimming" the back of the blade and reducing the gap. I have no intention of testing this theory, but it does make sense. Again, this is not my theory, but rather one I've seen cited in a few sources.

Like other key vintage razors, hype waxes and wanes. Ultimately, I really didn't expect this level of a step-up from my other shavers. After a single shave with the first gen, it had me contemplating why I needed any other safety razors, DEs or otherwise. Now, granted, my exposure to vintage SEs are limited to the 1912 and Damaskeenes, of which the 1912 has been my favorite. I've never tried an injector, so I can't speak to them. It's strange, though---even bittersweet---in that I really like my other razors, particularly the variety and aesthetics, but honestly, I don't have another razor that can even approach the efficiency and comfort of this razor. My desire to have some variety may be quelled by picking up a few more of these razors and having Delta Echo do their magic.

I don't know if Streamlines are necessarily rare, but they are sought-after. This is one of those razors that every wet shaver should have the opportunity to use. I really don't want to overstate it, but in many cases, I suspect it will change a wet shavers shave for life.

Here are a few pics illustrating the differences between the two models:

The first gen is on the left. You'll notice the considerably larger apertures and grooved, but closed bar. The second gen on the right has open slots.


Any finish difference noted in the following image is purely related to lighting. Both models have an impeccable thick chrome finish. In my search, I did have to look hard to find examples without brassing on the bottom plate, as the cast chroming resulted in this common wearing defect. Not a single one suffered from plate loss in the high friction areas. These two exhibited no plate loss, so I won't be having them re-finished.


This image of the first gen demonstrates the split spine.



Here's the solid spine on the second gen:


Here are a couple shots of the Ever-Ready "New Chrome Strop Outfit" packaging:




For purist collectors, this one is actually a mismatch because the razor on the left is a first gen, but the paired auto-strop has text on it which would make it from a second gen set.



A few unimaginative images of the "Strop Outfit" case:





First gen head weight: 33.4 grams


First gen handle weight: 49.4 grams


First gen gross weight: 82.8 grams


Second gen head weight: 34.9 grams


Second gen handle weight: 43.6 grams


Second gen gross weight: 78.5 grams


Glamour shots album of the first gen
Glamour shots album of the second gen
 
I found both of my Streamline's at the same place. At the time, I didn't know about the stropper, they had it also. I believe the handles were swapped. The plating on one handle is lighter, like the stropper in the picture above. They wanted $20 or $40, can't remember, just for the stropper. The next time I'm down that way, I may have to bite the bullet and buy it. It's about a 4 to 5 hour drive, so I'm not worried about.
 
What a very fine article 120inna55. Thank you for taking the care and the time to write it and to post it.

I guess I never thought too much about it, but it seems that I have a 1950's version. And it seems that mine is a New Chromium Strop Outfit. What a great name.
 
What an outstanding review of these beautiful razors. I'm sorry I missed it the first time you posted it. I have two of them, one is a complete set, both are mint (although probably not NOS), and both are second Gen. I agree with your appraisal of the shaves--they truly are excellent.
 
Here are some shots of my Gem Jewel. There's speculation that the Gem Jewel sets were for export only to the Commonwealth nations - mine came to me from Perth, AU.

It was apparently sold as part of a gift set in a vinyl kit with some other grooming tools. Only the nail file and scissors remained.

IMG_20170720_175439.jpg

IMG_20170720_175554.jpg
IMG_20170720_180209.jpg
IMG_20170720_175639.jpg

IMG_20170720_175939.jpg IMG_20170720_180048.jpg
 
Well, thanks to the generosity of rabidus, I have joined the Cult of Streamline as well, and extremely happily and gratefully. I have very much enjoyed the shave I get from this razor, and an earlier poster was correct: once you get a great SE shave it's hard to put it down and use a DE.
The Streamline is beautiful, smooth, and efficient. What's not to love?
 

Northstonehill

Contributor
As stated in the acquisitions thread this Streamline is on its way to me - being the very first SE I’ve ever laid my hands on. I’ve been hoarding vintage DE’s for almost 2 years and love them deeply. But got curious about SE’s and stumbled upon this very nice condition Streamline and immediately fell in love with the looks, guess it’s a 2nd generation? - Can’t wait to try it out :001_wub:
(Seller pics)

595DD91D-9A15-4CD1-B7B3-DCC58EDC675C.png 5C32B572-12B1-4625-B175-2F09735CBF15.png
 
I thought I had posted this here, but I guess not. Here's a little write-up I did back in April 2017:

It's no secret, I've become a member of the "Streamline" cult. I've done a bit of research, so I thought I would share it here along with some images demonstrating the differences between the first generation and the second generation. I'll stipulate that the first generation are generally accepted to have been introduced in the 1930s and then re-released with some changes in the 1950s. These dates are estimates, and neither model has a date code.

My OCD dictates that I at least initially use parentheses to set off the moniker, "Streamline", because it's not necessarily correct. In fact, "Streamline" is more a reference to packaging than to the razor itself. Among others, the 30s and re-introduced 50s "Streamlines" were essentially named after their respective packaging/cases: "Ambassador", "Strop Outfit", "Jewel", and yes, "Streamline". Except for having either "Gem" or "Ever-Ready" embossing, the razors were the same, and only the packaging and accessories changed.

I won't go into the history of Ever-Ready and Gem (along with the overlap) as it's beyond the scope of this writing and there are plenty articles on the subject. Yet it is worth noting that in modern times, it's commonly believed that the "Jewel" was only with the "Gem" branding and that it was marketed to North America and, I think, Australia. That's a misconception as there are clearly shippers that show the "Jewel" to have the Ever-Ready branding. Particularly in the 2nd generation models, there's a lot of cross-over with regard to naming, packaging, and branding. In modern times, because the razors are all the same (and all made in England), we're at a loss as to what to call them because there's no way to prove the sets remain with their original accessories and packaging. Thus, it's generally accepted that calling the razor itself a "Streamline" identifies it.

As far as difference between 30s (1st gen) and 50s (2nd gen), the 30s were a little heavier, had a thicker neck, larger apertures, and closed grooves on the bar as opposed to the open slots of the 50s'. Additionally, the 30s had a notch on the back of the head where the 50s had a solid spine. In the case in which the razor was paired with a strop kit, the auto-strop on the first gen was devoid of text where the second gen had the following embossed: "Ever-Ready Pat Appld for - Made in England Automatic Stropper"

With regard to performance, I can speak with some authority on this as I have been using both models for about 2 months. The first gen gross weight is 82.8 grams (head is 33.4 and handle is 49.4). The second gen gross weight is 78.5 grams (head is 34.9 and the handle is 43.6). Frankly, I don't notice the 4 gram weight difference between the two as I'm using them. I do notice a significant decrease in blade feel when I go from the first gen to the second gen lending a slightly smoother shave yet no discernible sacrifice in efficiency. I wouldn't call either of these razors harsh, but the second gen has become my favorite in part because it's more forgiving. The other reason has to do with application. The solid bar along with larger apertures on the first gen seems to port the lather directly down the handle. The open slots on the second gen dispenses the lather right out the bottom of the head. In typical use, this may not be relevant. However, being a shower shaver, I do appreciate the lather being directed away from the handle. It's a small matter, but it does give more points to the second gen in my opinion.

I've only used modern Gem PTFE blades with these razors, and in theory, I may not be receiving the shave these razors offered in their day. There has been speculation that due to the thinner rib on modern rib-back blades, we get a slightly more aggressive shave than with the vintage blade. It was theorized that the thicker rib angled the blade downward slightly. It would be like "shimming" the back of the blade and reducing the gap. I have no intention of testing this theory, but it does make sense. Again, this is not my theory, but rather one I've seen cited in a few sources.

Like other key vintage razors, hype waxes and wanes. Ultimately, I really didn't expect this level of a step-up from my other shavers. After a single shave with the first gen, it had me contemplating why I needed any other safety razors, DEs or otherwise. Now, granted, my exposure to vintage SEs are limited to the 1912 and Damaskeenes, of which the 1912 has been my favorite. I've never tried an injector, so I can't speak to them. It's strange, though---even bittersweet---in that I really like my other razors, particularly the variety and aesthetics, but honestly, I don't have another razor that can even approach the efficiency and comfort of this razor. My desire to have some variety may be quelled by picking up a few more of these razors and having Delta Echo do their magic.

I don't know if Streamlines are necessarily rare, but they are sought-after. This is one of those razors that every wet shaver should have the opportunity to use. I really don't want to overstate it, but in many cases, I suspect it will change a wet shavers shave for life.

Here are a few pics illustrating the differences between the two models:

The first gen is on the left. You'll notice the considerably larger apertures and grooved, but closed bar. The second gen on the right has open slots.


Any finish difference noted in the following image is purely related to lighting. Both models have an impeccable thick chrome finish. In my search, I did have to look hard to find examples without brassing on the bottom plate, as the cast chroming resulted in this common wearing defect. Not a single one suffered from plate loss in the high friction areas. These two exhibited no plate loss, so I won't be having them re-finished.


This image of the first gen demonstrates the split spine.



Here's the solid spine on the second gen:


Here are a couple shots of the Ever-Ready "New Chrome Strop Outfit" packaging:




For purist collectors, this one is actually a mismatch because the razor on the left is a first gen, but the paired auto-strop has text on it which would make it from a second gen set.



A few unimaginative images of the "Strop Outfit" case:





First gen head weight: 33.4 grams


First gen handle weight: 49.4 grams


First gen gross weight: 82.8 grams


Second gen head weight: 34.9 grams


Second gen handle weight: 43.6 grams


Second gen gross weight: 78.5 grams


Glamour shots album of the first gen
Glamour shots album of the second gen
wow that's awesome!
thanks that's a great bit if additional information

so so glad to see the cult is still alive and growing!!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
As stated in the acquisitions thread this Streamline is on its way to me - being the very first SE I’ve ever laid my hands on. I’ve been hoarding vintage DE’s for almost 2 years and love them deeply. But got curious about SE’s and stumbled upon this very nice condition Streamline and immediately fell in love with the looks, guess it’s a 2nd generation? - Can’t wait to try it out :001_wub:
(Seller pics)

View attachment 909069 View attachment 909070
Yes, that's a second generation. The case would be a "Jewel" case.
 
Hi All,
Long time lurker and long time shaver:)
Having been drawn into this thread over the last couple of days, and looking at hundreds of images including current sets on ebay around the world, I am confused as to whether the assertion that all early type razors came with a strop without the patent wording on is 100%.
A couple of posters have asked about their sets and having been near enough 30's to 50's UK cars are am very aware that we were not very good at sticking to rules regarding parts:)
I have just this weekend found what I believe to be a very unusual Streamline set with this combination and want to check before I embarrass myself with any pictures!
I am aware this is my first post but just want to be sure and can't understand why I have found so many sets in pictures with "early" razors and "late" strops.
I have a very early Series 3 Land rover for example but quite a few parts are original Series 2 as they were still using up stock.
Please see pic attached of one for sale at the moment with very equal looking wear on both items but still "different" eras.
If anyone could help out I would be very grateful and once I get near a camera I will take some pics of the set I found to explain further.
The combination I have is the "early" Razor and "late" strop, cased, not boxed, with 4 original Corrux blades and original unused strop with lots of celluloid remains underneath but sadly not still wrapped.
I am just waiting to get near a camera but in the meantime wanted to ask coz I am like a kid with a new toy and am excited so please forgive me:)
s-l1600 (1).jpg s-l1600.jpg
 
Hi All,
I have not had a chance to take any great pics yet but just wanted to add a couple of pictures of a Gold Plated Streamline set I found lurking in an an antique store.
It looks amazing but I am nervous to use it as it seems to have never been used!20180910_132253.jpg 20180910_132313.jpg 20180910_132335.jpg 20180910_132359.jpg
 
Hi All,
I have not had a chance to take any great pics yet but just wanted to add a couple of pictures of a Gold Plated Streamline set I found lurking in an an antique store.
It looks amazing but I am nervous to use it as it seems to have never been used!View attachment 924072 View attachment 924073 View attachment 924074 View attachment 924075
That is a truly great acquisition!
Do we have much info about the gold plated Streamlines?

In any case congratulations!
You must be very pleased with that indeed!!
 
I thought I had posted this here, but I guess not. Here's a little write-up I did back in April 2017:

It's no secret, I've become a member of the "Streamline" cult. I've done a bit of research, so I thought I would share it here along with some images demonstrating the differences between the first generation and the second generation. I'll stipulate that the first generation are generally accepted to have been introduced in the 1930s and then re-released with some changes in the 1950s. These dates are estimates, and neither model has a date code.

My OCD dictates that I at least initially use parentheses to set off the moniker, "Streamline", because it's not necessarily correct. In fact, "Streamline" is more a reference to packaging than to the razor itself. Among others, the 30s and re-introduced 50s "Streamlines" were essentially named after their respective packaging/cases: "Ambassador", "Strop Outfit", "Jewel", and yes, "Streamline". Except for having either "Gem" or "Ever-Ready" embossing, the razors were the same, and only the packaging and accessories changed.

I won't go into the history of Ever-Ready and Gem (along with the overlap) as it's beyond the scope of this writing and there are plenty articles on the subject. Yet it is worth noting that in modern times, it's commonly believed that the "Jewel" was only with the "Gem" branding and that it was marketed to North America and, I think, Australia. That's a misconception as there are clearly shippers that show the "Jewel" to have the Ever-Ready branding. Particularly in the 2nd generation models, there's a lot of cross-over with regard to naming, packaging, and branding. In modern times, because the razors are all the same (and all made in England), we're at a loss as to what to call them because there's no way to prove the sets remain with their original accessories and packaging. Thus, it's generally accepted that calling the razor itself a "Streamline" identifies it.

As far as difference between 30s (1st gen) and 50s (2nd gen), the 30s were a little heavier, had a thicker neck, larger apertures, and closed grooves on the bar as opposed to the open slots of the 50s'. Additionally, the 30s had a notch on the back of the head where the 50s had a solid spine. In the case in which the razor was paired with a strop kit, the auto-strop on the first gen was devoid of text where the second gen had the following embossed: "Ever-Ready Pat Appld for - Made in England Automatic Stropper"

With regard to performance, I can speak with some authority on this as I have been using both models for about 2 months. The first gen gross weight is 82.8 grams (head is 33.4 and handle is 49.4). The second gen gross weight is 78.5 grams (head is 34.9 and the handle is 43.6). Frankly, I don't notice the 4 gram weight difference between the two as I'm using them. I do notice a significant decrease in blade feel when I go from the first gen to the second gen lending a slightly smoother shave yet no discernible sacrifice in efficiency. I wouldn't call either of these razors harsh, but the second gen has become my favorite in part because it's more forgiving. The other reason has to do with application. The solid bar along with larger apertures on the first gen seems to port the lather directly down the handle. The open slots on the second gen dispenses the lather right out the bottom of the head. In typical use, this may not be relevant. However, being a shower shaver, I do appreciate the lather being directed away from the handle. It's a small matter, but it does give more points to the second gen in my opinion.

I've only used modern Gem PTFE blades with these razors, and in theory, I may not be receiving the shave these razors offered in their day. There has been speculation that due to the thinner rib on modern rib-back blades, we get a slightly more aggressive shave than with the vintage blade. It was theorized that the thicker rib angled the blade downward slightly. It would be like "shimming" the back of the blade and reducing the gap. I have no intention of testing this theory, but it does make sense. Again, this is not my theory, but rather one I've seen cited in a few sources.

Like other key vintage razors, hype waxes and wanes. Ultimately, I really didn't expect this level of a step-up from my other shavers. After a single shave with the first gen, it had me contemplating why I needed any other safety razors, DEs or otherwise. Now, granted, my exposure to vintage SEs are limited to the 1912 and Damaskeenes, of which the 1912 has been my favorite. I've never tried an injector, so I can't speak to them. It's strange, though---even bittersweet---in that I really like my other razors, particularly the variety and aesthetics, but honestly, I don't have another razor that can even approach the efficiency and comfort of this razor. My desire to have some variety may be quelled by picking up a few more of these razors and having Delta Echo do their magic.

I don't know if Streamlines are necessarily rare, but they are sought-after. This is one of those razors that every wet shaver should have the opportunity to use. I really don't want to overstate it, but in many cases, I suspect it will change a wet shavers shave for life.

Here are a few pics illustrating the differences between the two models:

The first gen is on the left. You'll notice the considerably larger apertures and grooved, but closed bar. The second gen on the right has open slots.


Any finish difference noted in the following image is purely related to lighting. Both models have an impeccable thick chrome finish. In my search, I did have to look hard to find examples without brassing on the bottom plate, as the cast chroming resulted in this common wearing defect. Not a single one suffered from plate loss in the high friction areas. These two exhibited no plate loss, so I won't be having them re-finished.


This image of the first gen demonstrates the split spine.



Here's the solid spine on the second gen:


Here are a couple shots of the Ever-Ready "New Chrome Strop Outfit" packaging:




For purist collectors, this one is actually a mismatch because the razor on the left is a first gen, but the paired auto-strop has text on it which would make it from a second gen set.



A few unimaginative images of the "Strop Outfit" case:





First gen head weight: 33.4 grams


First gen handle weight: 49.4 grams


First gen gross weight: 82.8 grams


Second gen head weight: 34.9 grams


Second gen handle weight: 43.6 grams


Second gen gross weight: 78.5 grams


Glamour shots album of the first gen
Glamour shots album of the second gen
Thanks for the in depth research, I just purchased a Streamline Razor and discovered it to be a 2nd generation model because of you quality research. (No case unfortunately)
Thanks Ron
 
It arrived today at 2pm I shaved with it at around 2.17pm......best looking razor I have ever seen, best performing razor I have ever used. I'm so ecstatic that I have found and efficient and somewhat aggressive razor that I can use. If I never use another razor again, ill be satisfied.

A stunning, stunning piece of shaving equipment.

2.jpg
 
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