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The Codger Cabin

From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


Junior had his Keds. And Dad had his Kedsman.




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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):



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"Pontiac! We Build Excitement!"

No, wait, that was about 45 years in the future.

The $828, the ad says, was for the business coupe, the model with the large compartment behind the front seat for salesmen to stash their sample cases. A bit more, no doubt, for a family sedan. And the guy driving it looks as if he's wearing an Open Road hat, the "LBJ" style we know of today . . . though I think at this point, 1941, Stetson's "Open Road" model was a regular fedora with no "Western" overtones.
 
"Pontiac! We Build Excitement!"

No, wait, that was about 45 years in the future.

The $828, the ad says, was for the business coupe, the model with the large compartment behind the front seat for salesmen to stash their sample cases. A bit more, no doubt, for a family sedan. And the guy driving it looks as if he's wearing an Open Road hat, the "LBJ" style we know of today . . . though I think at this point, 1941, Stetson's "Open Road" model was a regular fedora with no "Western" overtones.
Looks more like a Stratoliner to me, can't see the crease so it's hard to tell. I don't know if the Open Road was sold open crown or strictly Cattleman's crease.
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


Junior had his Keds. And Dad had his Kedsman.




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I was strictly a PF Flyers kid; Red Ball Jets in a pinch.

I remember seeing adult men in sandals with socks as a kid and just rolling my eyes - now it's a thing again but I still can't stand the look.
 
Looks more like a Stratoliner to me, can't see the crease so it's hard to tell. I don't know if the Open Road was sold open crown or strictly Cattleman's crease.
I don't think the OR, the original 1930s model, was done as cattleman crease. The artwork I've seen in Stetson ads of that time shows them as standard fedoras. Yes, the Pontiac driver could be wearing a Strat. Remember, a Strat and an OR are pretty much the same hat in dimensions and appointments. Their labeling is different, and the early Stratoliners had their cool box and marketing.
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


A few more beers, and Pops puts a horseshoe through a window. Guaranteed. But I don’t think the other guy will mind so much by then. Besides, making an old fellow sit on an old fruit basket like that just isn’t that neighborly. Especially an old codger who smokes a pipe, wears a hat, and drinks beer.



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I noticed that the fine print on all the car ads say “delivered to” Detroit or Pontiac where I’m assuming they were assembled. Were there car dealerships that charged transport costs to get them to your hometown or did people go to the factory and drive them off the lot?
 
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I noticed that the fine print on all the car ads say “delivered to” Detroit or Pontiac where I’m assuming they were assembled. We’re there car dealerships that charged transport costs to get them to your hometown or did people go to the factory and drive them off the lot?

That’s earlier language for FOB, or free on board. A term of sales law. It is where the manufacturer’s risk of shipment loss, title, and cost of transport ends in the chain of commerce. Losses thereafter are covered by others, which risks are typically insured.

Manufacturers also charge a destination fee if they are supplying further transport services to a dealer, and that is not mutually exclusive from FOB.

All of this effectively went on from the earliest days of the industry, but the sales boys weren’t always on the same page as the legal departments. Farmers weren’t expected to travel from Kansas to Detroit to pick up their new Model Ts. Ford worked out the assignment of risks with their dealers.

Delivery is also a legal term of art, but is technically not as cleanly applicable under these sales circumstances, which is probably why most manufacturers later changed their sales terms to FOB.
 
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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


Unlike today’s low common denominator advertising, PA smokers during the golden era were sometimes exposed to relatively sophisticated topics, such as this interesting example.

In this “Wonders of America”, the Judge and Chubbins share period research into cosmic rays. At this time, the rays being measured were in fact secondary radiation, resulting from actual cosmic particle impacts into the Earth’s atmosphere. Much like a streaking cue ball smashing into a rack of billiard balls, scientists then were still only detecting the ‘balls flying from the rack’. This relation between primary and secondary cosmic ray radiation was confirmed after deflection experiments using the Earth’s magnetic field. Primary cosmic radiation would not be directly measured until satellite-based experiments in the late 1950s. But the earlier ground-based equipment described in this 1941 ad was a valuable step towards that understanding.

Thought-provoking science, and good-tasting PA, too. The old codgers were spoiled in that regard.



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Mount Evans! I never drove it when I lived there, but as I recall it was a news item every year, mentioning the day the road opened (May, I think) and the day it closed (October?).
 

steveclarkus

Goose Poop Connoisseur
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


A few more beers, and Pops puts a horseshoe through a window. Guaranteed. But I don’t think the other guy will mind so much by then. Besides, making an old fellow sit on an old fruit basket like that just isn’t that neighborly. Especially an old codger who smokes a pipe, wears a hat, and drinks beer.



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I certainly have no quarrel with that. I’m fact I would enjoy being there with them.
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):



A leak-proof battery. We need those nowadays!

I don’t see any beer in that boat, so this was probably a ‘leak-proof’ fishing outing in every respect. At least they’re all wearing hats.

More importantly, we’ve reached the point where pipe smoking has firmly embedded itself into mid-Century culture. Right down to the battery ads (plural ... there are others!). Pipes are about everywhere. Our codger forefathers rule the land. Peace reigns in America, for a few more months.



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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):



They’re not making Pontiacs anymore. It worked out swell. I don’t think he’s driving anymore, either. But when he did, he smoked a pipe. With a hat. But I’m not so sure it was SWR, looking at the lady.



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In the Pontiac ad, he looks like Maurice Chevalier, and she's got a lot of that Greer Garson elegance going on. Her expression says, "It's not a bad car, Pop, but did you have to get it in orange???"
 
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