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The Codger Cabin

RG, I'm kind of in the same camp as you. Sir Walter and his cousin R.O. Matic, Half & Half (prob. my favorite to date), Carter Hall, Granger, Matches Field & Stream and Edgeworth, and now I'm considering trying Match Bond Street (now called Bourbon St.) and Match Briggs. I've bought Match Walnut, but haven't smoked it much; I'm waiting for cooler weather to try more of the Englishes.

Like many of you I'm curious about what our grandfathers' day had to offer. And I love the idea of smoking something that was readily available in the long-ago time when you could stroll down to the local drugstore on a soft evening after supper, and pick up a pouch of H & H or a tin of Edgeworth. Plus the latest issue of The Saturday Evening Post for the next installment of one of their serials or a new story by this "science-fiction" writer Robert A. Heinlein. . . .

You couldn't in my town until the 1980's. The stores were mostly closed in the evenings thru the 1970's.
 
You couldn't in my town until the 1980's. The stores were mostly closed in the evenings thru the 1970's.
Even drugstores? Even on, say, a Thursday night? The main shopping district near me, the department stores, all stayed open till 8, I think, on Thursdays, so that people could shop for Friday night. And drugstores and newsstands did not close until quite late, I think.
 
Even drugstores? Even on, say, a Thursday night? The main shopping district near me, the department stores, all stayed open till 8, I think, on Thursdays, so that people could shop for Friday night. And drugstores and newsstands did not close until quite late, I think.

Most closed by 6 pm. Exception for Christmas season which incidentally began after Thanksgiving. Once a Peoples Drug came to town that changed. We didn't have any fast food restaurants either, not until later that I can recall. Sleepy southern town.
 
Most closed by 6 pm. Exception for Christmas season which incidentally began after Thanksgiving. Once a Peoples Drug came to town that changed. We didn't have any fast food restaurants either, not until later that I can recall. Sleepy southern town.
Same in my home town, except that the newstands stayed open until 8:30 or 9:00. I remember dropping in after scout meetings to grab a Coke or a candy bar. We had two or three locally-owned pharmacies, plus a People's Drug (pretty good store, swallowed up by Eckerd I think) and SuperX, which was connected in some way to Kroger.
 
Most closed by 6 pm. Exception for Christmas season which incidentally began after Thanksgiving. Once a Peoples Drug came to town that changed. We didn't have any fast food restaurants either, not until later that I can recall. Sleepy southern town.

Our town news stand was a walk in, and would stay open evenings until 9, except on Sunday. Sort of a precursor to the convenience store. The drug store was a mom and pop independent and closed sooner, but had a little luncheonette grille and fountain counter in the back. Lots of sundries in that one, and at some point they put in carpeting by the greeting cards and cosmetics. A two-chair barber shop, spinning pole outside and obligatory shoe shine machine inside.

Most other stores and grocers closed no later than 9. Most sooner. People spent time with their families more then and wanted to get home. Stores open until 10 came years later. Bars and movie theaters were a different story. Especially the drive ins, which didn’t even open the gates until nearer dusk. The drive ins were more of a Friday-Saturday night thing. Kids would play ball in the back of the drive in field until the sun set and it got closer to show time. You would hang this big metal wired speaker box on the door window and hope it didn’t get too cold … or buggy. Or leave it hang on the pole, roll the window down, and take your chances.

We did have a Sears (hard goods only, no clothes) and it was air conditioned, and that was GREAT to walk into in the summer, like walking into a refrigerator. I remember them competing with the town’s appliance dealer, but the latter held his own pretty good.

Oh … and a little two window walk up ice cream stand along the state road, also a mom and pop, that I think is still going on there 65+ years later, with the grandkids running it.
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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An oil change and lube every thousand miles --! Of course their advice is dead right about keeping your car serviced, and that when you do you'll find it more fun to drive.

What was the gargoyle icon about? I see they had the Pegasus logo even then.
 

steveclarkus

Goose Poop Connoisseur
Growing up my little backwater town would nearly roll up the sidewalks at 9pm. It is no longer the sleepy little town I used to know, and I miss it dearly.
After living in or around cities during my entire career, I found a small town in a rural county and moved there. I can easily walk to town from my house or be in the mountains in minutes. It is a pleasant place with friendly people and little traffic. Loving it.
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


That guy on the right looks a little TOO happy. Not even Prince Albert brings that much joy. What’s in that pipe? Lucky for him DUI statutes weren’t too common then. At least he can now see what he’s hitting.




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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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4 hours for a muskie bite is pretty good! Up in the great frozen North of Massachusetts they call muskie a one in 10,000 casts fish.

The headlights one, I agree with you Columbo. What vapors is that lamp burning and sending through the cabin of that car?
 
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