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The Codger Cabin

From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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Sounds like William Conrad.
That's unmistakably William Conrad. And the "Rawhide will be right back" announcer sounds an awful lot like Roy Rowan, who introduced radio's Gunsmoke (starring Conrad) before George Walsh took the job and carried it into the TV era. Rowan did a lot of work for CBS Radio, including Yours Truly Johnny Dollar (the Bailey episodes) and The Adventures of Philip Marlowe.
 
That's unmistakably William Conrad. And the "Rawhide will be right back" announcer sounds an awful lot like Roy Rowan, who introduced radio's Gunsmoke (starring Conrad) before George Walsh took the job and carried it into the TV era. Rowan did a lot of work for CBS Radio, including Yours Truly Johnny Dollar (the Bailey episodes) and The Adventures of Philip Marlowe.
... this link may interest you:

 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


Aside from interesting messages, in some of these earlier Edgeworth ads evening radio programs and “The Corn Cob Pipe Club of Virginia”, network broadcast from the Edgeworth Factory, are mentioned.

One can picture all across America on those evenings in the early 1930s ... men quietly sitting in their living rooms and kitchens, perhaps huddled together with their families ... calmly puffing ... the tubes in their RCAs and Philcos and the Edgeworth in their cobs and briars all gently glowing orange ... the relaxing aroma of the tobacco ... enjoying comforting Southern spirituals and entertainment ... as men sang to them over the ether from far away places ...




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The Corn Cob Pipe Club show aired on Wednesday nights at 9:00, and the Edgeworth Program (with the Dixie Spiritual Singers) aired at 8:00 pm on Thursdays, in 1932. I'm not sure how long the series ran or when they started; I looked them up at www.worldradiohistory.com in the archived schedule guides. I couldn't find examples of either show in the OTR Archives unfortunately.
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... this link may interest you:

Old Time Radio : Free Audio : Free Download, Borrow and Streaming : Internet Archive - https://archive.org/details/oldtimeradio is another good resource, I especially appreciate the OTRR's work in restoring OTR episodes.
 
The Corn Cob Pipe Club show aired on Wednesday nights at 9:00, and the Edgeworth Program (with the Dixie Spiritual Singers) aired at 8:00 pm on Thursdays, in 1932. I'm not sure how long the series ran or when they started; I looked them up at www.worldradiohistory.com in the archived schedule guides. I couldn't find examples of either show in the OTR Archives unfortunately.
View attachment 1249865
Interesting! I also peruse that radio archive. Great periodicals there.

Drilling down a little there, Edgeworth was not alone on the Radio at that time. In early 1932, Prince Albert also sponsored the “Prince Albert Quarter Hour” at 7:30 pm every night but Sunday. No idea as to content, but 15 minutes would have been a short feature format.
 
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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


32-4.4.jpg
 
No, I think her "no" was definitely fear of being seen with a dude in a baggy polka-dot suit. I'm sure a skunky pipe isn't helping though.
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


32-5.1.jpg
 
The Edgeworth "26 Long Smokes for 15 Cents" ad is reasoned, persuasive, thoughtful -- and it would not fly today. Too many words for today's instant-gratification culture and for consumers who haven't read anything but a cereal box since they were 12.

The offer of the free sample is, however, a good bet by the manufacturers, and a good deal for the prospective customer. How much was a stamp in 1932 -- 2 cents? Invest 2, get the equivalent of 15 back (though they may have sent a smaller sample than the standard tin in that promotion).

The guy in the earlier Sir Walter ad, I think, is not wearing polka dots; it's the artist's shorthand for a tweed suit. But those plus fours, the baggy pants, were probably considered way out of style by 1932. They were fashionable among young "collegiate" men 10 years before. So he had a big strike against him with her even before the pipe came into the picture.
 
Interesting! I also peruse that radio archive. Great periodicals there.

Drilling down a little there, Edgeworth was not alone on the Radio at that time. In early 1932, Prince Albert also sponsored the “Prince Albert Quarter Hour” at 7:30 pm every night but Sunday. No idea as to content, but 15 minutes would have been a short feature format.
PA also sponsored the Grand Ole Opry on WSM:

GrandOleOpryOtr.jpg
 
The Edgeworth "26 Long Smokes for 15 Cents" ad is reasoned, persuasive, thoughtful -- and it would not fly today. Too many words for today's instant-gratification culture and for consumers who haven't read anything but a cereal box since they were 12.

The offer of the free sample is, however, a good bet by the manufacturers, and a good deal for the prospective customer. How much was a stamp in 1932 -- 2 cents? Invest 2, get the equivalent of 15 back (though they may have sent a smaller sample than the standard tin in that promotion).

The guy in the earlier Sir Walter ad, I think, is not wearing polka dots; it's the artist's shorthand for a tweed suit. But those plus fours, the baggy pants, were probably considered way out of style by 1932. They were fashionable among young "collegiate" men 10 years before. So he had a big strike against him with her even before the pipe came into the picture.
He was out of style in every way. He wasn't smoking SWR. I'm guessing that was the subliminal message being painted in that one. He had to look the part of being outdated.

Reminds me of the Apple v. PC ads of a decade or so ago on that angle.

I'm guessing an ounce on the Edgeworth sample, because that appears to be the sample size offered in their later pipe combo boxes. FWIW, the tax stamp sizes on pocket tins varied among manufacturers, from 1 1/4 ounces, all the way up to the "Big 2" offered by PA. Many hovered somewhere around 1.5 ounces, give or take a little. When they crow about how many smokes and pipefuls you're getting from a tin, you need to be slightly skeptical. That claim was all over the place.
 
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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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