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The Codger Cabin

From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):

Dill’s. Perhaps the great great grand daddy of all the American codger blends. All the others were latecomer whippersnappers compared to this one. Extinct by the time I started piping, it had faded away completely by 1960. Because of the way it was packaged, even the exceedingly rare 75-year-old example still extent has long ago dried up into unrecognizable tastelessness. Without the actual recipe (or someone with the foresight to have properly jarred some), it’s almost impossible to even ‘match’ it today. All that remains are the stories ... and the pipe cleaners.

But back in the early 1930s, it was still a respected and reasonably popular blend. Reports from the dinosaurs were that it offered notes of coffee and fruits (what fruits I do not know). When a codger dies and goes to heaven, perhaps St. Peter hands them a fresh tub of Dill’s at the gates.

Dill’s. Our DoDo Codger of the day. We’ll see it flap around on the coffee table a few more times before it goes away.


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Whisky

Contributor
I'm really enjoying these old ads. Thank you Columbo for posting these. After seeing the ads for "Old Briar" I find myself wanting to go visit old light houses and stare at them contemplatively while smoking a pipe.
 
I'm really enjoying these old ads. Thank you Columbo for posting these. After seeing the ads for "Old Briar" I find myself wanting to go visit old light houses and stare at them contemplatively while smoking a pipe.
Thank YOU (and all the others, too) for looking at them!

I'm honestly not sure how many are following along, and appreciate the feedback to gauge whether to continue.

We have hundreds and hundreds more in the pipeline. All sorts of good stuff.
 

Whisky

Contributor
Thank YOU (and all the others, too) for looking at them!

I'm honestly not sure how many are following along, and appreciate the feedback to gauge whether to continue.

We have hundreds and hundreds more in the pipeline. All sorts of good stuff.
Keep em coming. I’m looking up the places (lighthouses) in the ads and they’re all still standing. Access is different for each one, but I see some road trips in the future.
 
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steveclarkus

Goose Poop Connoisseur
Thank YOU (and all the others, too) for looking at them!

I'm honestly not sure how many are following along, and appreciate the feedback to gauge whether to continue.

We have hundreds and hundreds more in the pipeline. All sorts of good stuff.
Keep it up please. Much appreciated.
 
Ran across this featuring spots for SWR on YooToob:

The first half is the only part about smoking, but it's fascinating. Watch the GTO spot, however, and see if you can figure out who the announcer is.
 
Sounds like William Conrad.
Nobody pronounced his Rs like Conrad for sure. He was all over TV in those days (ca. 1964), as the narrator of Bullwinkle, the intro and outro narrator of The Fugitive, as an actor on Have Gun -- Will Travel among others, and even directing: a ton of TV, including 77 Sunset Strip.
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


32-2.3.jpg
 
I love how SWR seems to be as focused on pipe maintenance as the tobacco.
Agreed. Of all the majors, only SWR consistently honed in on this, almost from the brand‘s inception. As we’ll see in the weeks ahead, several blenders routinely offered ‘pipe combo’ packages: a new pipe (some personalized!) and their tobacco in a presentation box. And PA would occasionally explain how their lower temps were better for new pipe break in. But SWR took it to another level with their free booklets on pipe smoking and pipe care.

For a lot of beginning pipe smokers, those little SWR booklets were their only mentor. As I mentioned before, as we get further along, I’ll put up one of those booklets, from the late 1950s.
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


32-3.1.jpg
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


32-3.2.jpg
 
From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


Aside from interesting messages, in some of these earlier Edgeworth ads evening radio programs and “The Corn Cob Pipe Club of Virginia”, network broadcast from the Edgeworth Factory, are mentioned.

One can picture all across America on those evenings in the early 1930s ... men quietly sitting in their living rooms and kitchens, perhaps huddled together with their families ... calmly puffing ... the tubes in their RCAs and Philcos and the Edgeworth in their cobs and briars all gently glowing orange ... the relaxing aroma of the tobacco ... enjoying comforting Southern spirituals and entertainment ... as men sang to them over the ether from far away places ...




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From The Cabin Coffee Table — An occasional look back at what the old Codgers saw and smoked (with a little detour and frolic, here and there):


Aside from interesting messages, in some of these earlier Edgeworth ads evening radio programs and “The Corn Cob Pipe Club of Virginia”, network broadcast from the Edgeworth Factory, are mentioned.

One can picture all across America on those evenings in the early 1930s ... men quietly sitting in their living rooms and kitchens, perhaps huddled together with their families ... calmly puffing ... the tubes in their RCAs and Philcos and the Edgeworth in their cobs and briars all gently glowing orange ... the relaxing aroma of the tobacco ... enjoying comforting Southern spirituals and entertainment ... as men sang to them over the ether from far away places ...
A fine, evocative post!
 
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