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The AeroPress Thread

IIRC, Mr. Adler said there were no problems in that regard. This was in the original Aeropress thread on coffeegeek. That was one of the longest threads I've ever seen on a forum, btw.


Wayne
 
Yeah, props to you, Alan, for finding the sort of geeks likely to use your product and showing up on their forums to answer questions. Have you done this anywhere else besides Coffeegeek?
 

Jim

Moderator
I use my Aroe press at work all the time. Recently I ran into an expensive problem. My grind was a little fine and I was giving the press a little extra pressure when ~BLAM~ the filter blew out, slacks, shirt, tie, the wall needs to be painted in the kitchen, the only thing not ruined was my socks . That was probably the most expensive cup of joe I never got. :mad:

Anyone else have this happen to them ?
 

letterk

Moderator Emeritus
I use my Aroe press at work all the time. Recently I ran into an expensive problem. My grind was a little fine and I was giving the press a little extra pressure when ~BLAM~ the filter blew out, slacks, shirt, tie, the wall needs to be painted in the kitchen, the only thing not ruined was my socks . That was probably the most expensive cup of joe I never got. :mad:

Anyone else have this happen to them ?
Not yet! <crossing fingers>
 

Dinder1

Moderator Emeritus
I use my Aroe press at work all the time. Recently I ran into an expensive problem. My grind was a little fine and I was giving the press a little extra pressure when ~BLAM~ the filter blew out, slacks, shirt, tie, the wall needs to be painted in the kitchen, the only thing not ruined was my socks . That was probably the most expensive cup of joe I never got. :mad:

Anyone else have this happen to them ?
Jim, we have got to get you a better grinder my friend.:eek:
 
Perhaps too much pressure?

When I use the thing, I don't press very hard at all. I press hard enough to "follow" the liquid through the filter rather than trying to force it through. It takes me about a minute to press through a full 4 cup brew. I really think that part of what makes the thing work so well is that air pocket under the plunger, which finishes the extraction from the grounds. I want that whole air pocket to be there as the liquid leaves the grounds.
 
With regards to the instruction manual and to technique:
I still use this almost daily and have changed a few things along the way.
No fancy schmancy grinders or thermometers are used in my prep.
Please allow me to share.

1. I grind my beans in a Bodum C-Mill as fine as possible. 30 seconds or so
2. Boil 16 oz of water in microwave
3. Assemble Aeropress and add 2 heaping tsp (teaspoons) coffee to unit.
4. Remove water from microwave and count to 15. Temp down to around 200 F.
5. Pour water onto grounds and fill to the top. Stir until well mixed.
6. Wait for about 3 minutes. (water / coffee level should be down to around the "2")
7. Begin the extraction and start pressing (30 -1min)
8. Add rest of water to the cup

Start to finish with hot water on grounds should be around 4 minutes.
 

martym

Contributor
I love mine!!

Some days I use 70 grams of coffee ground on a 38 with my Encore.
Other days I use 14 grams of coffee ground on an 11 with my Encore.
And sometimes I throw in a couple scoops of pre ground coffee.

I use a 20 oz tumbler.
Good stuff either way.
I have never brewed a bad cup with an AeroPress
 
We've been using one pretty much exclusively for maybe 3, 4 years now after using a Melita cone and paper filters since the end of the 70's. Grinding it fine with a Hario Minimill and i usual do 30g of beans or a bit less depending on the beans, to only half a cup of water.

Sort of French Press methodology, upside down steep for almost 4.5 minutes before plunging.

Used three times a day and have had to replace the plunger gasket once, getting to the point it may need to be done again.

Gave friends the same setup before they went to Kuwait for a year of teaching and they were thrilled to have it along.

Not much of an investment and i'm very happy with what ends up in my cup, not looking to replace it with anything.

Also in the time i've had mine, quite a number of local shops now stock them and the filters are very easy to come by.

dave
 
The aeropress makes a very good cup of coffee. It is really a step above a cheapo auto-drip machine that does not brew at ideal temperatures.

But over the past few years I have used mine less and less. I think that is because it is not as good as an espresso/Americano (YMMV) and just a touch more involved in setup and cleanup than a pour over, due to the three parts versus the single part which is the pour over basket.

Regardless I think all coffee enthusiasts should try it.
 
I've been using a french press lately and have been loving it. But hearing about this device has me intrigued. One of the things I like about french press is that you get the oils along with whatever fines get through. I've honed by grind setting so that I get very few fines out of a 4 cup carafe of coffee. So, what is the filter mechanism and does it allow the oils from the beans into the coffee that ends up in your cup? And do you get any fines? I actually don't mind them. They add to the "mouth feel".
 

martym

Contributor
I go in phases. French press, Chemex, AeroPress, Mr. Coffee, clever dripped, and Moka Pot. Sometimes a Kuerig!

I use the same straight daily and same soap and same brush but rotate my coffee brewing method.

I'm weird!
 
I have been using my Clever coffee dripper at work and at home a French Press, decided to go back to the aeropress just to change things up... and a very smooth cup was had.
 
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