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Teflon, is it all that?

ouch

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He took her in his arms, looked deeply into her eyes and said, "Teflon is a registered trademark of the DuPont Corporation, and as such should only be used to describe its products or services. Please refer to it as polytetrafluoroethylene, or PTFE for short."

Excerpted from Ouch International's Guide to Bad Poetry
 
He took her in his arms, looked deeply into her eyes and said, "Teflon is a registered trademark of the DuPont Corporation, and as such should only be used to describe its products or services. Please refer to it as polytetrafluoroethylene, or PTFE for short."

Excerpted from Ouch International's Guide to Bad Poetry
I was waiting for this:001_302:
 

Esox

I didnt know
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Obviously there are differences, but are teflon-coated pans in any way analogous to blades where poor technique is concerned?
Almost all razor blades are coated with, at least, PTFE. It has to do with the "Drag Theory" according to Gillette as in the quote below.

"After discovering in his test lab that shavers could not tell the difference in blade sharpness, he was responsible for break-thru research that determined that blade sharpness was not a critical factor in receiving a good shave; rather a reduction in drag by hair clinging to the blade causing pulling was needed. This Drag Theory lead to the development of coated razor blades and specifically the Organosiloxane Gel coated Super Blue Blade (1959)."
@jmudrick also found the Gillette patent for blade coatings on the Gillette Super Blue blade.

Blade coatings are implemented to minimize drag of the edge as it passes through the hair. This is why, I believe, some blades work great for some and not as well for others. We all have different hair compositions so we all need to find the right blades with the right coatings for the most comfortable shave with our own hair composition.
 
I enjoy some Teflon coated blades, but I've thrown out all my non-stick cookware. Going forward, it's cast iron or stainless cookware for me. I don't want any of that non-stick coating getting into the food I feed my family.
 
*scrolls back to top of page to see which forum this is*

Razor blades. Okay. I don't cook on my blades and I don't shave with my pans.

I'm fairly certain that the blade makers don't spray PTFE onto their blades for their own amusement. It was found out 60 years ago that a coating on blades makes the shave smoother and more pleasant because the hair proteins don't stick to a coated blade. It's not particularly obvious to me why we'd need to re-litigate that. I should expect that those who have used uncoated blades versus coated can tell the difference. I certainly do with single-edged blades.

If you don't want anything to stick to your uncoated razor blade maybe put some melted butter on your face before you start shaving like how you grease your stainless cooking pans. Or use pre-shave oil. Whatever greases your wagon.
 
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There are few things in life as satisfying as spending years and years seasoning a cast iron piece of cookware until it becomes a finely-honed jewel that even the stickiest piece of protein just slides off of. Either that, or I have a very boring life. Anyway, back to razor blades ...

2019-05-29 22.00.19.jpg
 
I wonder if a fat-coated blade that was baked till seasoned would be as good as a PTFE blade if the temper wasn't altered. This might be a fun experiment for someone with too much time on their hands. Maybe it would work on a straight after honing.
 
Teflon is a trade name for a series of compounds called per and poly florinated alkyl substances or pfas. Do a google search on pfas in Rockford Michigan.....it is a huge, and I mean huge issue in Michigan right now. Wolverine had a shoe factory in Rockford and used this material to waterproof their shoes. Pfas has contaminated hundreds of private wells in the area and this stuff is toxic in the parts per trillion levels.
 
Teflon is a trade name for a series of compounds called per and poly florinated alkyl substances or pfas. Do a google search on pfas in Rockford Michigan.....it is a huge, and I mean huge issue in Michigan right now. Wolverine had a shoe factory in Rockford and used this material to waterproof their shoes. Pfas has contaminated hundreds of private wells in the area and this stuff is toxic in the parts per trillion levels.
Teflon is PTFE not PFOA. PTFE is very safe for humans, but PFOA has some big problems with endocrine disruption, cancer, and other ailments. It used to be that PFOA was used as a surfactant in the manufacture of Teflon, but almost all manufacturers have stopped using PFOA for that purpose.
 
Yes, the fumes from overheated PTFE are known to be lethal to birds. It's not usually an issue, but bad things can happen.

My wife (never that I could do this) left a pan heating on the stove a few years ago and forgot about it. There was a noxious smoke floating around our kitchen for a bit. Thank God this is before we had the parrot. We've seen many reports of people unintentionally killing their pets in this manner.
And that's why sailors had birds on submarines back in the day. Some exhaust fumes are undetectable by humans until it's too late. It's a shame about the parrot dying.

Clayton




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