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Tatara Muramasa Adjustable Razor and Negative Blade Exposure

Hi,

I have been reading about Tatara Muramasa Adjustable Razor. Of the 5 settings that it has, No 1&2 has negative Blade Exposure. Most of the reviews dub this razor as a mild razor at all settings, with no love to settings 1 & 2, with some members even branding these settings as "lather movers". Why would the Tatara team even keep these negative blade exposure settings. Can someone please explain how does the negative blade exposure setting even works in shaving?
 
I am one Muramasa users that does not agree with such "common" complaints regarding levels 1 and 2. Those two levels are mild true, but for me not so inefficient as their blade exposure would suggest. I use those setting quite a lot and value that I have such a razor. I am a daily shaver and having a mild levels 1 and 2 on muramasa that I can use intermittently for my skin to take a breather is really nice. In my case considering the time expenditure and effort expended in the morning (2.5 pasess + touchup) l get a very nice close comfortable shave nearing a damn fine shave with those levels without a problem. More than enough to get you through your job looking presentable. BBS is in my case mostly for levels 3 and up. If you would take more care and diligence you could get BBS with those 2 levels also. But with more passes, which is then counter productive. Those two levels add to the agility and mindlessness of shave with muramasa. Sometimes that is just the thing one needs in the morning when minutes are running scarce and your mind is elsewhere which happens to me more than I would like ...

I personally would not change anything regarding the blade exposure limits (upper and lower) on muramasa. I am more than satisfied with the whole package.
 
Hi,

I have been reading about Tatara Muramasa Adjustable Razor. Of the 5 settings that it has, No 1&2 has negative Blade Exposure. Most of the reviews dub this razor as a mild razor at all settings, with no love to settings 1 & 2, with some members even branding these settings as "lather movers". Why would the Tatara team even keep these negative blade exposure settings. Can someone please explain how does the negative blade exposure setting even works in shaving?


I love settings 1 and 2. In fact, that's all I use it at, between 1 and 2.

I can't speak for others but I get a close, very smooth shave without blade feel.

One way of explaining it is that irritation I get from blades are very dampened with the Muramasa, so I can use a much wider variety of blades with it and get great shaves. I joked elsewhere that it's a bad razor for testing blades that are new to me because all blades feel good in it. That's an exaggeration but not much of one in some ways.

The combination of negative exposure and a nontrivial blade gap is perfect for me. I wish more razors were offered with similar specs. I can only think of a couple others offhand, and one I'm not sure is even being sold anymore.
 
Hi,

I have been reading about Tatara Muramasa Adjustable Razor. Of the 5 settings that it has, No 1&2 has negative Blade Exposure. Most of the reviews dub this razor as a mild razor at all settings, with no love to settings 1 & 2, with some members even branding these settings as "lather movers". Why would the Tatara team even keep these negative blade exposure settings. Can someone please explain how does the negative blade exposure setting even works in shaving?

Maybe to answer your last question more directly, the idea is that your skin flexes a bit into the razor gap, especially with a big enough gap, so you don't need to have exposed blade to actually cut the hair at the base. The blade is hidden behind the cap and bar, but exposed to the base of the hair, so you cut it without skin exposure.

Or something like that.

My guess is like everything in shaving this probably works better for some than others? It works very well for me.
 
For comparison, I use the Seygus Zepplin and McMurphy 17-4 with excellent success. The Muramasa doesn't quite "get there" for me at 1 & 2 and obviously, YMMV.
 
I thought that the top setting of the Muramasa had the same gap but slightly MORE exposure than a Nodachi.

I can't imagine anyone describing that as "mild".

This is one thing that I've genuinely been confused by. I've stuck with the lower settings because that's where I like it, but the higher settings of the Muramasa at least according to the specs aren't really mild looking. Even at the lower settings the gap isn't trivial; it's just counterbalanced by the pretty negative exposure. So if you cranked it up you should be able to get a decently aggressive shave because all of a sudden that gap is accompanied by positive exposure.

The Muramasa also is continuously adjustable, so you're not really restricted to a discrete set of settings.
 

ERS4

My exploding razor knows secrets
I'm Asian and a gentle razor usually works well for me.
Muramasa is very intuitive to me, I would start with a low number with a sharp fresh blade and then gradually progress to the higher numbers.

High-efficiency razors like the R41/Rex Ambassador are fun to use, but not something I would necessarily want to use every day.

Everyone has different skin, and the hair on different parts of the body has different skin sensations.

That's why we say ymmv
 
I love the Muramasa and find the settings 1-3 most useful. But I am using a sharp blade (mostly Feather).

I start little below 3 (so that dots are Aligned), second pass 2, third (ATG) on 1.
 
Hi,

I have been reading about Tatara Muramasa Adjustable Razor. Of the 5 settings that it has, No 1&2 has negative Blade Exposure. Most of the reviews dub this razor as a mild razor at all settings, with no love to settings 1 & 2, with some members even branding these settings as "lather movers". Why would the Tatara team even keep these negative blade exposure settings. Can someone please explain how does the negative blade exposure setting even works in shaving?

I have the Muramasa in steel and one in titanium that I either use at a setting of 4 or 5.
As you said, the two lowest settings have a negative exposure, but so do most safety razors…

That for me is Gillette’s original concept of a safety razor: hide the blade by a small amount to reduce the risk of small cuts and blemishes.
Many shavers like such milder razors and have no need for anything more aggressive.

If one is looking for a shave that comes close to a straight razor shave, where the cutting edge is in direct contact with the skin, one would need to use IMO a DE razor with positive, or at the very least neutral, blade exposure.

For me, as as (also) straight shaver, the Muramasa’s two upper settings are the ones that work best for me.
Just yesterday, I dialed the razor back from 5 to 4, as I can’t make up my mind which setting I like better.
Which makes more sense when you consider that I often use the Tatara Nodachi, with a blade exposure that sits right between the upper two Muramasa settings and that does everything that I ever could wish for.

For me, an adjustable razor like the Muramasa makes the most sense for someone who is on his journey to become a proficient DE shaver and works his way up from mild to more aggressive razors, or for someone who likes to change his razor setting from time to time.

Owning already a steel and titanium Nodachi, I was drawn to the Muramasa’s elegant, technical solution of adjusting blade gap and blade exposure at the same time, but for all practical purposes I had already everything that I needed in my Nodachi Ti.

A last word regarding the materials used; I do like titanium because of its low mass and ease of maneuverability.
If you should see no advantage in that, you might as well choose one of the stainless steel options.
The steep (about 2 x) surcharge for titanium makes only sense if you see a substantial advantage in that material, and I do know of some shavers who prefer the heftier feel of stainless steel.

In any case, the Muramasa Ti is only produced in small numbers once every year and the price (it’s the most expensive of my razors) is enough of a deterrent to keep it that way. If you are interested in that version, drop Tatara a line, they are just collecting expressions of interest for the next batch.



B.
 
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I thought that the top setting of the Muramasa had the same gap but slightly MORE exposure than a Nodachi.

I can't imagine anyone describing that as "mild".

You are right about both the Nodachi’s 0.90mm gap and the Nodachi’s exposure, which lies between Muramasa settings 4 and 5.

And you are also right about this not being a “mild” setting.
In my book, all “mild” settings have a negative blade exposure in common, but I admit that some might define “mild“ differently.


B.


Tatara Muramasa Settings:

⚫1 - gap = 0.60mm / exposure = negative 0.17mm

⚪2 - gap = 0.70mm / exposure = negative 0.07mm

⚫3 - gap = 0.75mm / exposure = 0 mm

⚪4 - gap = 0.80mm / exposure = positive 0.07mm

⚫5 - gap = 0.90mm / exposure = positive 0.17mm



Tatara Nodachi Settings:

1718212372561.jpeg
 
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