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Talking Dremel Rotary Tools & Accessories For Razor Restoration

Just make sure when polishing a blade make sure your wheel is spinning the same way towards the edge from the spine, so if you go over the edge it dont grab and cause injury to yourself.

Great advice, not just for safety. I find that with a dremel on the blade surface, you need to go spine to edge always or the blade will look splotchy. Plus there is usually some stirations in the blade in that same direction anyway.
 
I'm not sure what you mean here, but I'd like to know more?
I googled "reinforced dremel cutoff wheels". This is the first hit. You can see the strands of fibreglass reinforcing in the pics.
Dremel 426, Fiberglass Reinforced Cut-Off Wheels (1-1/4" Dia., .045" Thick, 5/pkg) - 426
I don't know the seller. I buy mine at a local brick and mortar store. Any building supplies store that sells tools probably sells them.
They are a little thicker than the regular cut off wheels, causing a slightly wider kerf. You can even grind a contour without the disc exploding.
 

Chan Eil Whiskers

Fumbling about.
I googled "reinforced dremel cutoff wheels". This is the first hit. You can see the strands of fibreglass reinforcing in the pics.
Dremel 426, Fiberglass Reinforced Cut-Off Wheels (1-1/4" Dia., .045" Thick, 5/pkg) - 426
I don't know the seller. I buy mine at a local brick and mortar store. Any building supplies store that sells tools probably sells them.
They are a little thicker than the regular cut off wheels, causing a slightly wider kerf. You can even grind a contour without the disc exploding.

Thanks to you and to Mike @Esox.

That does grind a contour mean?
 

Chan Eil Whiskers

Fumbling about.
You're welcome Jim.

To grind a concave or convex angle across an edge. Sort of like a router on wood.

I can picture the edge, but not how to make the edge with the tool without the Dremel router table gizmo (which has very mixed reviews).

My plan is to keep things fairly simple. I can maybe see getting a Harbor Freight grinder and/or polisher; they make a little keep-in-a-drawer grinder/polisher and various inexpensive models. Even more I can see getting their smallest bench press. However, for now I'm going to use mostly hand tools and maybe the Dremel for some cleaning and polishing. Sanding? Maybe some with the Dremel.

I'm not planning to start a factory, but if I had the money, space, and spousal agreement I'd have a really nice shop. Now we're talking CNC so I'd better shut up.

Thanks, Mike, and happy shaves,

Jim
 

Esox

I didnt know
My plan is to keep things fairly simple. I can maybe see getting a Harbor Freight grinder and/or polisher; they make a little keep-in-a-drawer grinder/polisher and various inexpensive models. Even more I can see getting their smallest bench press. However, for now I'm going to use mostly hand tools and maybe the Dremel for some cleaning and polishing. Sanding? Maybe some with the Dremel.

I'm not planning to start a factory, but if I had the money, space, and spousal agreement I'd have a really nice shop. Now we're talking CNC so I'd better shut up.

If you buy a setup like this Jim, you'll never use anything less, other than working on very small pieces.

image_22794.jpg


6 in. Buffer

Mount it on an elevated stand to keep it above the bench so you can fit a larger wheel. Use a stiff 4" - 6" wheel on one side and a larger, softer 8" - 10" wheel on the other. A two stage polisher like that will give you a mirror finish on properly prepped stainless, or anything else, in less than 10 minutes.

The only drawback to bench setups like that one is they're a constant speed. That one is 3450rpm which is fine for doing quick work with the smaller stiffer wheel and a more aggressive rouge with quite a lot of pressure, keeping in mind heat is your enemy, so only working a single area for a few seconds. Then moving to the larger wheel with a finer rouge and less pressure to finish.
 

Chan Eil Whiskers

Fumbling about.
If you buy a setup like this Jim, you'll never use anything less, other than working on very small pieces.

View attachment 930355

6 in. Buffer

Mount it on an elevated stand to keep it above the bench so you can fit a larger wheel. Use a stiff 4" - 6" wheel on one side and a larger, softer 8" - 10" wheel on the other. A two stage polisher like that will give you a mirror finish on properly prepped stainless, or anything else, in less than 10 minutes.

The only drawback to bench setups like that one is they're a constant speed. That one is 3450rpm which is fine for doing quick work with the smaller stiffer wheel and a more aggressive rouge with quite a lot of pressure, keeping in mind heat is your enemy, so only working a single area for a few seconds. Then moving to the larger wheel with a finer rouge and less pressure to finish.

Thanks, Mike.

I'd think variable speed would be a huge plus in an item like this. Don't see any at HF though.

You have to use a different wheel with each different rouge, but the wheels are not very expensive at HF.

For now I'm going to use hand tools and elbow grease. Then maybe my Dremel set up in a vise.

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Like this (above). I have the blue part on order and in transit. I have a smallish but probably okay clamp-to-the-table-top vise. I have the Dremel.

What I don't have is any kind of shop. My house is large enough where I could find the space but I'll do better (I think) with SWMBO if I drag my tools out and set them up and use them when I'm home alone. I'm not saying I plan to hide anything or be secretive; that's not my way nor is it in accord with how my wife and I have agreed to be with one another. But, she does better when stuff isn't in her face.

I should have bought a house with a shop in the yard or a garage. I have a basement, but it sucks too much to consider. Well, maybe not; I'll think about it. I could get away with a shop in the basement so it might be worth thinking about again and again and talking myself into. Still...the basement problem includes the fact that things put in my basement tend to rust so it's not likely a good idea. The rest of my house is as dry as anything can be in my neck of the woods.

When they talk about arbor size (1/2" or 1") that means the device that holds the wheel, right? So the wheel you use has to have the same arbor size as the buffer, right? Otherwise you have to devise a solution?
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The one I was thinking about is this one, linked. Much smaller. Half the power. Easily put away out of sight. I know it's not as great as the larger one. I know the larger on is not as great as one with variable speeds. But, this might be great compared to a Dremel?

Then there's the bench grinder with a buffer on the the other end. The 3/4 HP model. That would work, too, but how hard is it to change out the various buffing wheels, wire wheels, etc?

I wish I'd learned more from my grandfather and had his shop. What an idiot I was; I could have had it, but...oh, well, I could have bought Microsoft for pennies, too. Live and learn, if you're lucky.

Thanks and happy shaves,

Jim
 

Esox

I didnt know
The arbor is the shaft the wheels fit on to yeah.

Cotton wheels do make a mess. The wheels wear and throw their fibers around, along with the rouge.

Cotton wheels are also thinner than the stones they replace on bench grinders and the arbors are machined for stones and the washers that hold them. I had to build mine out with a bushing for clearance on the inside of the wheel and use another large thin washer and bushing on the outside between the wheel and the arbor nut.

Coulda, woulda, shoulda. We've all said it! lol
 

Chan Eil Whiskers

Fumbling about.
Especially if using a Dremel haha.

A very important thing to remember when polishing with a Dremel, or any small wheel or stone, is to keep it moving on the surface. If you stop or over work a single spot you can end up with an uneven finish.

As for cutting scales out of almost any material, one of the best tools is a simple coping saw. The old school way before we had Dremels. They're almost as quick too, once you get the hang of it.

View attachment 928830


That very thin fine blade will let you cut accurately along the outside edge of a pencil line leaving enough material under that pencil line to sand and smooth. Once you've become good enough with one you'll be amazed at the details that can be very easily and quickly cut.

Using power tools for that kind of very fine work can be difficult and one slip and you'll be starting over. If I was doing that kind of work all the time, I'd rough cut the material and then finish on a spindle sander. A miniature version of that would be putting the Dremel in a stand and using a drum sanding attachment like @Somerled suggested.

A shaper or router table for it is the perfect thing.

View attachment 928834

Dremel Rotary Tool Shaper/Router Table to Sand, Edge, Groove, and Slot Wood-231 - The Home Depot

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I bought the particular coping saw pictured mostly because of where it was made. I've used other coping saws in the past (not a lot, but enough) and found them flimsy and a pain in the neck compared to the one pictured. Mine was purchased on Amazon - here's the link - and took longer than I expected to arrive, but not an excessive amount of time.

This brand is a bit more expensive than some, but I can tell from messing around with it this morning that it is superior in function to the other coping saws I've used. Changing blades requires removing the handle which seems like a pain until you realize how securely and firmly and tightly this allows the blade to be held. It's a very good design and the tool just screams quality.

Yes, I found coping saws which cost less, but I found some that cost much more, too.

Mike, thanks for the little video. Very interesting fine detailed work. Also, I can see how this tool once learned very well might be very handy for the scale maker (the scale maker who doesn't have a Harbor Freight scroll saw).

I bought a hand coping saw to make my first set of scales using kirinite. Not sure whether I was using the wrong blade or not, but, I found cutting the kirinite to be a real PITA. Ended up just cutting it in half and sanding them into shape. Which took a while.

I think part of the issue is becoming very skilled with the coping saw (not that I am) and another part of the equation is using the right blade (not that I know what the right blade is). The closer the cut the less sanding, but too close a cut and the scales are toast!

Do you know what coping saw blade you used?

The blades are numbered. Lower numbers (like 14 TPI) are coarse cutting relative to high numbers (like 32 TPI). My saw came with a 14 TPI blade. I ordered replacement blades in 15 TPI and 32 TPI. I'm not sure what I'll use.

I'm looking at my Kirinite and figuring out whether I can get both scales out of one piece (I have two pieces of the same Kirinite). I can also glue the pieces together and cut both at the same time.

If I understand what you wrote, you cut both sides of the scale out of one piece of Kirinite, right?

Today's not the day for the project. I'm just looking things over.

Happy scale making,

Jim
 
The mini buffer/grinder is way less than half the power of the 6” buffer shown higher up. You can easily bog down the motor. This can be a good thing—much less likely to rip something out of your hands. The biggest downside is the very small exposedure of the buffing wheel. Sometimes it’s hard to get the thing you are polishing against the wheel without also hitting the grinding wheel on the other side. It’s also hard to find replacement buffing wheels and they have to be very close in size to fit inside the safety guard (I don’t remember if the guard is removable but I’m guessing it’s either not removable or not easily so because mine is still on)
 

Esox

I didnt know
Mike, thanks for the little video. Very interesting fine detailed work. Also, I can see how this tool once learned very well might be very handy for the scale maker (the scale maker who doesn't have a Harbor Freight scroll saw).

I've never used a coping saw, but I have seen them being used. Coping saws and scroll saws do work nothing else really can.

Something else I was going to suggest and forgot. :)

Bench Grinders and Accessories - WEN Products

The Wen Wet Wheel is an awesome tool. This is what I had in mind when I went to see the guy about fine grit stones.

4270.main_1800x1800.jpg
 

Chan Eil Whiskers

Fumbling about.
I've never used a coping saw, but I have seen them being used. Coping saws and scroll saws do work nothing else really can.

Something else I was going to suggest and forgot. :)

Bench Grinders and Accessories - WEN Products

The Wen Wet Wheel is an awesome tool. This is what I had in mind when I went to see the guy about fine grit stones.

View attachment 931946

I looked at the WEN slow speed grinder. I've been reading forums and articles about building your own DIY polisher. A good number of people, but by no means everyone, suggest using speeds of 1750 or slower. Apparently, it helps with not generating heat and it helps with safety.

Not saying I know anything, but I do have an electric motor that my brother bought for his DIY belt sander. I've not looked carefully at the motor to find out its specs, etc. I have no idea what his sander was about. He didn't leave it assembled nor did he really talk about it, but I believe he used it at least once before he died.

I miss my brother. It was very hard to watch the pancreatic cancer kill him, but he fought the good fight that's for sure. He'd probably build me a polisher if he were still here. He was the kind of guy who would think buying something at Harbor Freight was a waste of money if you could spend twice as much and build a better one yourself.

Happy shaves,

Jim
 

Esox

I didnt know
I looked at the WEN slow speed grinder. I've been reading forums and articles about building your own DIY polisher. A good number of people, but by no means everyone, suggest using speeds of 1750 or slower. Apparently, it helps with not generating heat and it helps with safety.

Just think how quickly and easily you could put an 8k edge on a razor with that slow water wheel, a couple stones and a leather wheel. what once took hours, now takes minutes.

Tormek has stones to 4k and maybe beyond if you dig for them.

Tormek Grinder, Japanese Water Stone Wheels for Tormek Grinders | FINE TOOLS

I dont know enough about electronics to say whats needed, but I have seen a variable speed setup where a knob was turned to select a certain rpm, with infinite range between. Only enough speed to do the work is needed.

There was a mobile sharpening truck around years ago, like an ice cream truck, he had music playing so you could hear him coming. He could put as finely a finished edge on anything you wanted other than a saw blade in 5 minutes or less. First on water stones, then a leather wheel.

I have a shop a couple blocks away I take my saw blades to, ETK Carbide Tool. They sharpen anything and I'm sure they also sell stones. I'll try and remember to ask when I'm in next but that likely wont be until spring. They're a very busy commercial shop, usually with a 7-10 day wait on my saw blades.
 
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