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Surplus field phones!

The ta-1 and 312 that were still in use, when I could get them, weren't in demand then. Now, realizing how a voice powered phone is actually a great thing to have run to a basement or barn, they are too expensive if you can find them. So I started to look and found these at a great deal. Swiss ftf 50's. (Feldtelefone sp) Powered by a d cell battery like many others back in the 1950's to early 1980's. Hand crank for the ringer, these came in fabulous shape and fully functional, so now I have to convince the Mrs's to ignore the surplus smell canvas gets and put a set to use somewhere haha. Most likely they will be in the collection of other things in the basement though. There are two styles with feet, one style has a logo in the inner bakelite ringer, the other is blank. Anyone else have any field phones out there? Here is a great video of one being tested,
. These are mine here.
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In the 90s, the 8 inch self-propelled howitzer FA battery I was in was still laying out wire for 312s so we in the FDC could give voice fire commands to the guns. Made sense in that it was one less radio signal going out to be detected and located by an enemy. But that was the old way of using artillery. Stay in one place and put rounds downrange over and over. A technique I was stunned to see the Russian Army still using for the first year of the current war.

That was an Army Reserve battery. When I went active duty the name of the game was constant movement after 3-6 salvos, to avoid couter-battery, and I never ran another land line for commo again.
 
In the 90s, the 8 inch self-propelled howitzer FA battery I was in was still laying out wire for 312s so we in the FDC could give voice fire commands to the guns. Made sense in that it was one less radio signal going out to be detected and located by an enemy. But that was the old way of using artillery. Stay in one place and put rounds downrange over and over. A technique I was stunned to see the Russian Army still using for the first year of the current war.

That was an Army Reserve battery. When I went active duty the name of the game was constant movement after 3-6 salvos, to avoid couter-battery, and I never ran another land line for commo again.
Mid to late 90's we had singars radios but as scouts would setup lines for security details. Usually oddball stuff from a lp or op, maybe a front gate area back to the crew. They were useful , just like old cool stuff now too lol.
 
I’ve only seen them in the movies. What sort of battery? Ni-Cd?
The newer ta-1 is voice powered no battery. These are a single D cell, like AshleyC stated, some take multiple D cells as well or need an adapter. Not sure if the D cell adapters using AA batteries inside are worth the risk, they don't hold the same capacity overall I don't think either. Might try rechargeable D cells, I have CCrane radio I got a deal on that uses those as well.
 
Do you know what the La and Lb/E means?
This link TA-312/PT - RadioNerds - https://radionerds.com/index.php/TA-312~PT
describes among other things:
CB Common battery operation, power comes from the switchboard​
LB Local battery operation, power is from the local installed batteries​
CBS Common battery signaling (local battery for voice), power from switch board, but the installed batteries are used for voice. this is useful if the sound quality is low due to long distance from the switchboard.​
Which made me wonder was La meant to denote local audio, similar to CBS mode of operation? Though one might expect that CB would have been supported as well (added as first step), so my guess must be wrong.
 
Mid to late 90's we had singars radios but as scouts would setup lines for security details. Usually oddball stuff from a lp or op, maybe a front gate area back to the crew. They were useful , just like old cool stuff now too lol.
SINCGARS is fantastic stuff. I spent way too long suffering through life with those 62 pound, two-man lift, AN/VRC-46 radios that had a cooling fan in the back that would run whenever you keyed the Mike.

Four of those blaring out all day are undoubtedly why I'm sitting here with the joyous buzz of tinnitus as my constant companion.
 
Do you know what the La and Lb/E means?
This link TA-312/PT - RadioNerds - https://radionerds.com/index.php/TA-312~PT
describes among other things:

Which made me wonder was La meant to denote local audio, similar to CBS mode of operation? Though one might expect that CB would have been supported as well (added as first step), so my guess must be wrong.
That video shows a brief wiring diagram inside if I pull the canvas off. I'll take one out tonight and take a pic. Another yt guy says you can use one wire to connect them and use one wire as ground but am unfamiliar with that. I have the manual downloaded but it's in I think German, so isn't to useful for me. I know a few phrases and words but that's it. Mainly to ask for one beer in about three languages haha.
 
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