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So let's say I made a pen or two

I just bought myself a small lathe. I am infatuated with it and am looking for beginner projects to learn. If I were to turn a pen or three would anyone like one as a PIF?
 
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Of Course. I live in the Midwest USA. I keep 10-15 pens inked on my desk on a daily basis and write on a variety of papers.

David B.
 
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may I ask if you are going to do everything yourself, starting from rods of whichever material to the design of sections and feeds or you will be only assembling pieces coming from various suppliers?
 
I don't mind you asking at all. I'm not certain I understand your question 100%.

I recently bought a small wood lathe. One of the recommended beginner projects is turning pens. As to what aspect of the pen that I will be creating, it is only the barrel essentially.

There are kits that one can purchase that contain the rest of the pens "guts" if you will. I hope that answers your question.
 
Chef you will enjoy your new hobby. I've turned a few pens myself. If I have any advice to give its this... if you're handy, it won't be a difficult project. The finish may be a learning curve if you are new to wood finishes. CY finishes (basically thick super glue) are quite durable. I personally use Danish oil and then spray with clear lacquer. Several coats, sand with 600 grit w/d or so, then a few more coats. Polishing is last. Lacquer is very easy to get good results with. The finish is not quite as durable, but it's not fragile either.

Once you get the hang of it, don't be afraid to spend money on good kits. Especially for fountain pens. Slimline cross type BP pens are OK to cheap out on a little. For a fountain, do yourself a favor and buy quality. No one wants to put in work to hand make something for it to crop out in a few months. Which is what happened to one of my first fountain pens.
 

Doc4

Stumpy in cold weather
If I have any advice to give its this... if you're handy, it won't be a difficult project.

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I too have a Midi Wood Lathe and have turned many projects in the past. I started with pens and other small kits. They make great Christmas Gifts for the family. Mail a couple to each family member. Then you can find that the pen kits can get very spendy. 40 bucks a pen and that's not counting your time, Wood, and finishing. In the end, if you think about your time, your into a pen up close to 60 bucks each if you get carried away.

Do some checking on youtube. I have also made the 5-cent pens. Scrap wood and a bag of Bic pens you salvage the insides from. No clip or cap but they are handy. Christmas decorations, shave brush handles. Goblets, there are so many things you can make without the need for a kit.

After a while, you can make all types of stuff. Enjoy the fun. Learn to make bowls. But be careful as the cost of chucks and tools can get you into many hundreds of bucks. But it's fun.
 

Doc4

Stumpy in cold weather
The finish may be a learning curve if you are new to wood finishes. CY finishes (basically thick super glue) are quite durable. I personally use Danish oil and then spray with clear lacquer. Several coats, sand with 600 grit w/d or so, then a few more coats. Polishing is last. Lacquer is very easy to get good results with. The finish is not quite as durable, but it's not fragile either.

IMHO, most pen users are going to prefer a matte finish that allows better grip/feel with fingers directly on the wood grain, rather than a thick, glossy, slippery coating that might be more appropriate elsewhere. Of course that may make the pen susceptible to staining from ink so YMMV.
 
IMHO, most pen users are going to prefer a matte finish that allows better grip/feel with fingers directly on the wood grain, rather than a thick, glossy, slippery coating that might be more appropriate elsewhere. Of course that may make the pen susceptible to staining from ink so YMMV.
Most kit pens have a fairly long head at the nib designed for the writing hold. This head screws into the pen body,, and most of the time will be the length of the cap (including the nib). My fingertips don't touch wood grain while writing so this is a non issue.
 
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