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Smoked Pork Butt on the Weber - Pic Heavy

Luc

"To Wiki or Not To Wiki, That's The Question".
Looks like I have to cook the last piece of shoulder that I have in my freezer this week-end... Nice work!
 
I have been wanting to get into smoking and grilling this year.
This thread just fuels the fire!

Thanks for sharing.
 
I bet the Weber kettle is good for this recipe, but probably harder to hold temps. Your pork butt venture looks amazing. Truly. Bravo.

Here's the madness I create:

Pork butt on a WSM (Weber Smoky Mountain). A fair sprinkle of Lowrry's seasoned salt and a mix of apple and cherry for smoke. Smoke it like you would a brisket, which means throw it on the smoker and forget you own it until the neighbors come begging for food. Take it off and pull it for sandwiches or ice cream topping...without the ice cream.

Also, if you're really frisky, you can throw a 5lb can of Bush's baked beans in the lower rack for the last four hours. Added smoke flavor goes well with the sandwiches.

Home grated slaw and a good beer or five and you have a meal on your hands.

Now, for discussion: all the rendered fat from a smoked pork butt would make interesting shave soap if someone has the talent. Probably a nice bacon and smoke scent. What are the odds of that happening?
 
I bet the Weber kettle is good for this recipe, but probably harder to hold temps. Your pork butt venture looks amazing. Truly. Bravo.

Here's the madness I create:

Pork butt on a WSM (Weber Smoky Mountain). A fair sprinkle of Lowrry's seasoned salt and a mix of apple and cherry for smoke. Smoke it like you would a brisket, which means throw it on the smoker and forget you own it until the neighbors come begging for food. Take it off and pull it for sandwiches or ice cream topping...without the ice cream.

Also, if you're really frisky, you can throw a 5lb can of Bush's baked beans in the lower rack for the last four hours. Added smoke flavor goes well with the sandwiches.

Home grated slaw and a good beer or five and you have a meal on your hands.

Now, for discussion: all the rendered fat from a smoked pork butt would make interesting shave soap if someone has the talent. Probably a nice bacon and smoke scent. What are the odds of that happening?

It is harder to hold temps on the kettle, that is why I went with the pork butt. I would never attempt a brisket on that thing and to tell you the truth calling it smoking is probably a misnomer. It is so close to the heat, even at low temps, that it isn't solely being cooked by the smoke. I never thought about the beans being done that way, but now I have something new to try. If you can figure out a way to make that soap...I'm In!
 
It is harder to hold temps on the kettle, that is why I went with the pork butt. I would never attempt a brisket on that thing and to tell you the truth calling it smoking is probably a misnomer.

Have you ever seen these smoker controllers for kettles? There are several manufacturers, but they go over your bottom vent and control the amount of oxygen to the fire to regulate the temperature.

https://pitmasteriq.com/
 
Have you ever seen these smoker controllers for kettles? There are several manufacturers, but they go over your bottom vent and control the amount of oxygen to the fire to regulate the temperature.

https://pitmasteriq.com/

I have sen those and will probably get one at some point...but still not sure I would try a brisket on a kettle grill. Thanks for sharing!
 

Luc

"To Wiki or Not To Wiki, That's The Question".
I have sen those and will probably get one at some point...but still not sure I would try a brisket on a kettle grill. Thanks for sharing!

You should give it a go. I made one last year, started at 7am and took it off around lunch time. I made a few mistakes but for a first brisket. I will adjust for the next one. Instead of foil, I now have paper butcher. I use the snake method which burns slower. I do not have a fancy fan or anything to do it. Only a temperature gauge that I installed myself on the weber. Next time, we will also eat it around 6pm or 7pm.
 
Brisket is done by temp. Usually about 205°F is considered done. You'll notice that is fairly high compared to the lower temps of about 150°F for a medium well steak. But brisket is a gristly tough piece of meat, so we cook it until all the gelatin like substances have melted. This mimics a juicy piece of steak, when in fact, the brisket is over cooked. My best one ever is when the WSM ran away from me and cooked it at about 350-375. Was mmmmmtastey. Better than 20 hours at 225. Sacrilege, I know.
 
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