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Show Us Your BICYCLE(S)!!!!

Wow! I have 28mm on my Roubaix and there is question as to how easily the frame will accept 32s. I think I will really have to go gravel dedicated if I do much more trail/forest service road riding. Thanks for the reply and enjoy the rides!
If you don't mind the extra weight(some people do). This bike is 19lbs with the current wheels, tires and pedals. The DT Swiss wheels are ~1650 grams. I am probably going to buy a new wheel set for road riding exclusively this winter.

If you want to stick with Specialized, the Diverge series are good gravel bikes. I tried to find a Diverge Comp carbon in my size locally, no dice. I preferred a double front chainring since I plan on doing quite a bit of road riding.
 
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Since 1 is none, and 2 is one..., bike #2 has a January delivery date. I'll post pics here. A hint:

[ made in the U.S.A. ]


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@camjr is your Brooks saddle as comfortable as everyone says they are?
It's a Brooks B17, and it really is comfortable once it's broken in. Some people say that takes 500-1000 miles, but when you weigh 225 pounds like I do, it happens quickly :thumbsup:. Others say it's comfortable right out of the box. Personally, I found it quite comfortable right out of the box. The leather tends to flex on the saddle frame rather than a padded saddle that never really compresses for comfort, and when paired with the steel frame, very little if any road chatter makes it up to me. I put a lot of miles on that old Motobecane, and should have done it a lot sooner. The Brooks saddle was purchased and installed in May 2020 along with the Brooks bar tape that really dresses that champagne colored frame up.

Cheers.
 

Bob L.

Contributor
It's a Brooks B17, and it really is comfortable once it's broken in. Some people say that takes 500-1000 miles, but when you weigh 225 pounds like I do, it happens quickly :thumbsup:. Others say it's comfortable right out of the box. Personally, I found it quite comfortable right out of the box. The leather tends to flex on the saddle frame rather than a padded saddle that never really compresses for comfort, and when paired with the steel frame, very little if any road chatter makes it up to me. I put a lot of miles on that old Motobecane, and should have done it a lot sooner. The Brooks saddle was purchased and installed in May 2020 along with the Brooks bar tape that really dresses that champagne colored frame up.

Cheers.
A good leather saddle doesn't really break in. Your rump learns to ride it. The surface and shape of a good leather saddle is what makes them special. You picked a great one!
 

Commander Quan

Commander Yellow Pantyhose
@camjr Thanks. I've got a saddle that I like well enough, but I'm always on the lookout for upgrades.

I started doing sprint distance triathlons in 2019, and eager to get back to it this year after everything was cancelled last year. The Leather wouldn't be ideal for racing because I start riding while wet but they do look nice.
 
My current steed is a 2003 Schwinn Sierra hybrid, with a frame of 7075 aluminum. I chose it for a MTB-slanted geometry and tires, but built it up with road components - which are lighter and simpler than MTB parts. I didn't need that extra complexity, as I wasn't going to be riding off-road or down hill between confers! So why carry it if I didn't need it? (My apokalypse bike is a Cr-Mo Raleigh, with a real minimalist approach and steel wherever I can). Though comfort took a precedence. Gel bar grips, seat cover, and shoe inserts are mandatory - along with nice big tires. lol
Back then I was more of a purist, preferring European componentry to Asian if at all possible. Weinmann, Gipemme, Mavic, and DT were part of vernacular. My bicycle now has a Sedis chain, Sachs Maillard freewheel, Huret deraillers, and originally had a Stronglight crank. These days it's harder and harder to find French parts as they've been bought out years ago. But I'm doing my part to keep the legend alive.
Admittedly that's alot of work! I had to do several modifications. To make the first Huret derailler - an Allvit - I had to modify it for a longer throw range, as it was designed for 5-speeds but now operating on a 7-speed cogset. (Adjusting the thumb shifters to make that stiff of a derailler manageable also took some doing. The new Rival derailler is much better). And the front derailler is the old standard bottom pull design - but the frame is made for a top pull. I had to invent and make a direction change mechanism for that derailler cable to change it's operation 180 deg. Fun times!

Here's my Schwinn and my Raleigh.
IMG_1718.JPG

IMG_4302.JPG
 
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