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Shaving without pressure?

We have all heard that when shaving with a SR you should use about zero pressure of the edge against your skin. I have found this to be correct. The lighter the pressure, the closer the shave.

What I can't understand is why is this so. How does having edge pressure against the skin while SR shaving decrease the closeness of the shave?

I'm only an engineer so cannot work outllogically in my mind.
 
Using the lightest, and slightest touch, is what made if possible -- i.e., without irritation -- for me to knock down the whiskers on my outer jaw where the jawbone curves. I do ATG on pass 2. The visualization when I do this is the edge clipping each whisker.

What is my explanation for why this works? The blade should ride on the skin so that it sheers the whiskers off right at the surface. If you press too hard, then the blade begins to press into the skin. The source of the irritation, as I deduce, is the skin being damaged by the scraping. Despite the irritation, why not a closer shave?

I recall an article from the Sharpologist about creating a bulge of skin ahead of the blade (one reason to stretch the skin). The bulge warps the surface and prevents the blade from having full contact, thus shearing off the whiskers in the wrong place on the hair shaft (not where the shaft meets the skin surface).
 
The problem is with applying zero pressure, especially with soft sensitive skin is that the whiskers tend to slide under the blade without being cut despite skin stretching and attention to blade angle I've concluded that the whisker roots (follicles) tend to be weaker with soft sensitive skin meaning they can be easily pushed over, by the blade, without being cut?
 
The problem is with applying zero pressure, especially with soft sensitive skin is that the whiskers tend to slide under the blade without being cut despite skin stretching and attention to blade angle I've concluded that the whisker roots (follicles) tend to be weaker with soft sensitive skin meaning they can be easily pushed over, by the blade, without being cut?

I highlighted a particular portion of the quote above because I think that some Men new to wet shaving fail to learn how to "map their beard". Meaning that they don't take the time to accurately assess what direction beard hair grows on different parts of their face and neck areas. What might be causing hairs not to be cut because they are as you put it, easily pushed over, might be a simple case of going ATG in that area as opposed to WTG.

I know when I first started shaving with a straight razor, I quickly found out that on my left side of my neck, WTG was actually going up and on the right side of my neck, WTG was actually going down and to the right at an angle. Prior to using a straight razor, I always wondered why areas were "missed". This was discussed on B&B some time ago here.

I personally find beard mapping very useful. Some may not. YMMV.
 

steveclarkus

Goose Poop Connoisseur
We have all heard that when shaving with a SR you should use about zero pressure of the edge against your skin. I have found this to be correct. The lighter the pressure, the closer the shave.

What I can't understand is why is this so. How does having edge pressure against the skin while SR shaving decrease the closeness of the shave?

I'm only an engineer so cannot work outllogically in my mind.
That question has been playing on my mind as well and it has baffled me as well even though I’m not an engineer. My only idea is that the razor pressing on the skin in some way affects the shaving angle relative to the whisker.
 
The problem is with applying zero pressure, especially with soft sensitive skin is that the whiskers tend to slide under the blade without being cut despite skin stretching and attention to blade angle I've concluded that the whisker roots (follicles) tend to be weaker with soft sensitive skin meaning they can be easily pushed over, by the blade, without being cut?
I have soft, sensitive skin. Thinking about this, the angle of the blade is a factor too. The edge of the blade needs to "catch" on the whisker root. I can see that if the blade angle is too shallow, it'll slide over the whisker. If the blade is not sharp enough, this will also result is the blade not catching.
 
No clue but fascinating question. I wonder if there is a "wave effect" off the leading edge of the blade that affects the effective angle when there is pressure?

As to mapping I have the general sense of it and it does affect (slightly) my approach, but in the end a 12-pass shave makes the point moot. Only kidding about the 12 passes, mostly :)
 
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