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Salt & Pepper (not the rappers)

I am another fan of Peugeot. I find them durable, easily adjustable, and available in a good range of sizes. I like slightly tall ones because they do not need refilling as often. As to salt, I use salt pigs by the stove and on the table for Diamond Crystal and use a salt cellar on the table for Maldon. The wet grey salt stays in a jar with a lid. The various other salts I use stay in bottles except for the smoked salt, which is in a bottle with a built in grinder.
 
Man, I've killed a coupla Peugeot grinders. The works are good, but tiny little screws into Lexan just make cracks until one day you find yourself straining a batch of stock to get the pieces of your pepper grinder out of it. Nice and peppery, I'll say that...

I've had a German one for decades on the table. Works a treat, but can't remember the brand. I keep one of those brass Greek grinders beside the stove.

Lately I bought a Skeppshult "Swing" pepper grinder. Lots of fun! It's on the table at the moment, beside the salt cellar. I find as my eyes age that I can't always tell how much is coming out of the shaker, but with a salt cellar or "pinch bowl" I know how much I'm putting on.

I looked at a Peugeot cast-iron grinder but the Skeppshult just called to me down deep.

O.H.
 

Doc4

Stumpy in cold weather
Moderator Emeritus
Man, I've killed a coupla Peugeot grinders. The works are good, but tiny little screws into Lexan just make cracks until one day you find yourself straining a batch of stock to get the pieces of your pepper grinder out of it.
IIRC, the metal grining works are screwed right into the wooden casing. No plastic involved ... unless you get one of their plastic models, I guess. But the classic wooden ones don't have that problem.
 

Alacrity59

Wanting for wisdom
Moderator Emeritus
I've been using a Unicorn Magnum Plus for quite a while. I'm pretty sure it has been about 10 years. If I recall it was necessary as I had dropped the pepper grinder from an acrylic set. I bought a salt grinder soon after, a Cole and Mason acrylic. The previous for salt was just a shaker. When cooking I tend to use pre ground sea salt (apparently all salt is sea salt) without iodine . . or gasp . . . Herbamare herbed sea salt because I like it.
 

Isaac

B&B Tease-in-Residence
Moderator Emeritus
Ive had my Peugeout for 11 years. There is a new pepper mill called The Pepper Cannon. the price is steep at $150, but it cranks out pepper like no ones business (no pun intended).

Still debating if i want to spend $150 on a grinder.
 
I've been using a 6-inch Magnum for about 10 years. I'll bet I use it not quite every day, maybe 6-8 meals/week.
 
Another Peugeot wooden pepper grinder here, we've had it about 5 years. We tried a few others including Bodum, but they were just not good enough. We still cannot find a decent salt grinder and tend to rely on seasoning during cooking - I have smoked Maldon flakes, Balinese hand-harvested sea salt, Himalyan pink rock salt, grey French sea salt and a very fine almost powdery one and cannot recall where I got it, all in jars by the cooker. There is a plastic grinder with the rock salt on the table which just about delivers but I am not enamoured by it.
 
Another Peugeot wooden pepper grinder here, we've had it about 5 years. We tried a few others including Bodum, but they were just not good enough. We still cannot find a decent salt grinder and tend to rely on seasoning during cooking - I have smoked Maldon flakes, Balinese hand-harvested sea salt, Himalyan pink rock salt, grey French sea salt and a very fine almost powdery one and cannot recall where I got it, all in jars by the cooker. There is a plastic grinder with the rock salt on the table which just about delivers but I am not enamoured by it.
I had a set of Perfex S and P. They both worked very well, but I gave them to my daughter because of my arthritic fingers' unhappiness with the small crank. As salt grnders go I found Perfex to be the best.
 
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