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Rotating motion

I have a question. I've read in many places that you shouldn't use rotating motions when applying the cream with a brush, because it can damage the knot. But now, just out of curiosity, I've read the instructions on a Bulgarian "Kapo" shaving cream and it says: "apply the cream to your face with rotating motions of your brush". So who is right and who is wrong?
 
I do both. I rotate to load, create lather in my bowl, and the initial face application. I then use brush strokes to top off on my face. I have yet to have an issue with any of my brushes.
 
If done carefully with a quality shaving brush (i.e., you get what you pay for, right?), I have found no issues using swirling motions. And, I have over 7 years almost exclusively using my Thater 4125/2 this way.
 
Do what thou will shall be the whole of the law....as far as being fairly free with shaving brush motion in cream application.
 
Interesting question!

Simpsons‘ written instructions recommend using a painting motion, which is what I do. Not sure if this really helps but it works for me! :a21: :a21:
 
I face lather and I swirl at the beginning to built up the lather going around the face. Then I paint here and there to even out the the amount and to cover everything. None of my brushes in the rotation ever complained. :001_rolle
I guess the obvious question is how much pressure you apply. :nono:
Be gentle and your brushes will be happy:a22:
 

Uncas

Contributor
I close the door behind me when I go to shave, what I report here will be only in the most flattering terms.
 
There's been a long going debate about this. Some say lathering in circular motion is okay while others say it's not. I lather in rotating motion because just painting will not give enough lather to work with. My brushes have been fine although I do notice my boars breaking in more in the center of the knot. I always make sure to clean out the brush and strop it so I haven't had much problem with it.
 

ackvil

Moderator
I load my brush with a swirling motion and work the lather on my face with a swirling motion. I then use a painting motion to even the lather. However, I use a gentle motion and do not mash the brush. I have been doing that since I started shaving and all of my brushes are in great shape.

I purchased the brush below in 1993 and it has been in constant use since that year. In fact, prior to joining B&B in 2010 it was one of three brushes in my rotation. As you can see the brush is in great shape.

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I personally buy fairly cheap brushes (under $25) so I swirl to load from the puck, load from a bowl, or bowl lather. I then paint the lather/base on my face and add water that way as well. Then I swirl to get a voluminous cushion of lather. Then I smooth it out painting style. I repeat the paint than swirl than paint for all three to four passes I do.

My AOS Pure Badger loses a hair most shaves now, but I started using that brush about 6 years ago maybe? Back in the dark times of the Gillette Fusion Cartridge razor.

My Omega Synthetic has a weird swirl to the bristles, but I don't care as I believe it needs it to work properly.

My Cremo Horse Hair got a knot from the hard splay and swirl technique I use, so I don't use it that much. I just don't like dealing with untangling the knot.

The rest of my brushes are too new to warrant comment yet on if the technique is damaging in any way.

So far I have enough brushes I want and have that I am not going to get too concerned about the technique. I don't mind replacing them if any ever truly crap out.
 
I have what I think is a reasonable collection of brushes which, for my income level at least, cost me a lot of money. I have read varying advice from brush manufacturers and others about the correct way to use a brush so as to avoid damaging it. I think this entirely misses the point - my brushes are first and foremost a tool to give me pleasure when face lathering, they are not an implement to be preserved for all eternity. If damage to a brush is the price that must be paid for the enjoyment of using it then it is a price well worth paying. If I feel like rotating, mashing, or swirling the brush then I will, because I enjoy it and that is the sole objective here. If I ruin the brush then I will buy a new one or get it re knotted. That said, my brushes are in great shape, a quality brush in my experience can stand a lot of abuse.
 
Interesting question!

Simpsons‘ written instructions recommend using a painting motion, which is what I do. Not sure if this really helps but it works for me! :a21: :a21:
Exactly; and Thäter is even more restrictive in their instructions (at least you are allowed - up until now - to look at a Thäter brush from all angles :001_tongu ).
Shavemac, by comparison, seems to have no issues with a rotating motion.

While I believe that manufacturers are in their right to describe a way in which their product should be used, I shall always give preference to an equally well performing product from a manufacturer who requires less pampering.

Hence, my number of Shavemacs may increase, while my number of Simpsons and Thäters is unlikely to increase any further.

Having said that; combing two perennial Vulfix (from the same group as Simpsons) shedders out and only applying painting movements as per Simpsons’ instructions seems to have tamed their shedding habits.


B.
 
Rotating motion will generate more friction between the bristles/hairs than a painting motion. Thus, if you want to maximize the usable life of your brush, limit the amount of rotation.

With horsehair brushes, rotating motion can easily cause the hairs to tangle. Sometimes this can happen with badger hair as well, but not as often. If a brush does tangle, wash the brush with shampoo and then apply hair conditioner. Then gently comb out the knot with a coarse comb. Start at the outside and at the tips and then work you way slowly towards the base of the knot so you do not pull out any hairs from the glue.
 
Dude buys an expensive, dense, 28mm Badger brush

Dude loads his brush with swirling motion

Dude bowls lather vigorously against the bowl’s ridges

Dude does not use circle motions in his face not to damage the brush’s hair

Dude is a hypocrite...
 
Dude buys an expensive, dense, 28mm Badger brush

Dude loads his brush with swirling motion

Dude bowls lather vigorously against the bowl’s ridges

Dude does not use circle motions in his face not to damage the brush’s hair

Dude is a hypocrite...
Dude, I couldn't have said it better. If someone claims that they don't swirl and mash, how do you load soap?

I swirl and mash because ... my brush, my rules.

I haven't had a brush fall apart after decades of daily use (I started shaving in the early 1970s). Now I have a bunch of brushes instead of just one, so they will all easily outlive me.
 

Uncas

Contributor
Everything in the Universe is round and going around. My brush is round, my bowl is round, my soap is round, my head is round, sort of.
 
I personally buy fairly cheap brushes (under $25) so I swirl to load from the puck, load from a bowl, or bowl lather. I then paint the lather/base on my face and add water that way as well. Then I swirl to get a voluminous cushion of lather. Then I smooth it out painting style. I repeat the paint than swirl than paint for all three to four passes I do.

My AOS Pure Badger loses a hair most shaves now, but I started using that brush about 6 years ago maybe? Back in the dark times of the Gillette Fusion Cartridge razor.

My Omega Synthetic has a weird swirl to the bristles, but I don't care as I believe it needs it to work properly.

My Cremo Horse Hair got a knot from the hard splay and swirl technique I use, so I don't use it that much. I just don't like dealing with untangling the knot.

The rest of my brushes are too new to warrant comment yet on if the technique is damaging in any way.

So far I have enough brushes I want and have that I am not going to get too concerned about the technique. I don't mind replacing them if any ever truly crap out.
If you want to take the tangle out of your Cremo Horse Hair, hold it vertically underwater and comb it gently with a fork.
 
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