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Picking a modern SR or two

I'm thinking about getting more serious into the SR shaving and I already have quite a few razors, all of which are vintage and I would like to add a modern razor or two to my small and humble collection.

For a while now I was thinking about getting an Aust, but a few days ago I saw a nice looking Revisor that is almost as twice as cheap and I was wondering if it's worth buying it.

I'm probably going to end up buying both razors, since they look great and i'm sure both are better shavers than a Boker Elite, but what do you think? Should I buy the Aust instead or just start with the Revisor and after some time grab the Aust.

These are the models that i'm talking about:

6-0048.jpgdsadsasda.jpg



Also, at some point i'm thinking about getting a few stones to keep my razors sharp. I already have a jnat ''super-finish'' and also a package of lapping films, but in the future I would like to get my hands on a Sharpton 4k or 5k and 8k. I think those and the jnat should be enough to keep my razors in top shape, but any suggestions would be appreciated.
 
Consider the Shapton Glass HC series, which comes in 4K, 6K, and 8K. I've found them to be superlative for my carbon steel razors.

In the HR series, Shapton considers 3000/10000/30000 to be their razor sequence. I can vouch for the first and last.

Is the 3000 HR better or worse than the 4000 HC? I don't know. They're both great. The HC polishes more, but that doesn't make it better. I hope to decide this question one day, but at the moment, I would flip a coin.
 
I can't comment on the actual Revisor that you are looking at. I can however say that the Revisor 6-0035 that I have is an extremely good modern SR. I am also considering buying some more Revisor SR's. They also provide very high quality at a reasonable price.

A few years ago Revisor were often well regarded on B&B. For some unknown (to me) reason they seem to have dropped out of the spotlight to be overtaken by Dovo, Thiers Issard, et al, neither of which I am overly fussed about.
 
If you're in the US, Revisor is still not shipping here. I confirmed this with them last week. Otherwise, they have great razors and fairly priced. Though, I believe they are technically vintage, aren't they?

Edit: i guess the Revisor branded ones are current but I think the ones listed as "Revisor Individual Items" are NOS vintage.
 
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I highly recommend Ralf Aust at any of their price points, they use a flat honing process and IMO are pretty easy to maintain and shave very nicely.
I have some TI,s but it's possible the honing will be more of a challenge due to hardness, and because their honing process from factory on their more basic models are not always as flat.
 
If you're in the US, Revisor is still not shipping here. I confirmed this with them last week. Otherwise, they have great razors and fairly priced. Though, I believe they are technically vintage, aren't they?

Edit: i guess the Revisor branded ones are current but I think the ones listed as "Revisor Individual Items" are NOS vintage.

I think you're right. I just looked at their website and found this razor. According to some random websites, the vintage ones are probably made in the 50s.

They even have razors made before WW2.
 
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I'm thinking about getting more serious into the SR shaving and I already have quite a few razors, all of which are vintage and I would like to add a modern razor or two to my small and humble collection.

For a while now I was thinking about getting an Aust, but a few days ago I saw a nice looking Revisor that is almost as twice as cheap and I was wondering if it's worth buying it.

I'm probably going to end up buying both razors, since they look great and i'm sure both are better shavers than a Boker Elite, but what do you think? Should I buy the Aust instead or just start with the Revisor and after some time grab the Aust.

These are the models that i'm talking about:

View attachment 1336951View attachment 1336952



Also, at some point i'm thinking about getting a few stones to keep my razors sharp. I already have a jnat ''super-finish'' and also a package of lapping films, but in the future I would like to get my hands on a Sharpton 4k or 5k and 8k. I think those and the jnat should be enough to keep my razors in top shape, but any suggestions would be appreciated.
That blade profile is extremely common and is a very handy shape. I believe it was first used for the Bismarck #2 and when Bismarck was bought by Dovo, that razor became the Dovo Bismarck, and they then made several other models using the same blade, just more or sometimes less cosmetic bells and whistles. TI also makes a "Bismarck" razor or two. I suspect there is probably one plant forging these blades for one and all. Anyway you will like that Revisor. The Ralf Aust Bismarck type shown above is also going to be a very good razor. And the Dovo Bismarck and other Dovos of the same pattern are great razors. I own several and they are my favorite modern premium razor.

Newbie Honing Compendium | Badger & Blade

You don't have to go groping in the dark as you pursue the art or science of honing. But if you have the correct lapping films, and a verified flat plate, I can tell you for a fact that you don't need any stones at all except for maybe a couple of coarse stones for repair and maybe bevel setting. Run a film progression up to 1μ and then a balsa progression to .1μ in accordance with The Method, and you will be glad you didn't buy a bunch of rocks. It is all in the link above and the threads linked from that one.
 
That blade profile is extremely common and is a very handy shape. I believe it was first used for the Bismarck #2 and when Bismarck was bought by Dovo, that razor became the Dovo Bismarck, and they then made several other models using the same blade, just more or sometimes less cosmetic bells and whistles. TI also makes a "Bismarck" razor or two. I suspect there is probably one plant forging these blades for one and all. Anyway you will like that Revisor. The Ralf Aust Bismarck type shown above is also going to be a very good razor. And the Dovo Bismarck and other Dovos of the same pattern are great razors. I own several and they are my favorite modern premium razor.

Newbie Honing Compendium | Badger & Blade

You don't have to go groping in the dark as you pursue the art or science of honing. But if you have the correct lapping films, and a verified flat plate, I can tell you for a fact that you don't need any stones at all except for maybe a couple of coarse stones for repair and maybe bevel setting. Run a film progression up to 1μ and then a balsa progression to .1μ in accordance with The Method, and you will be glad you didn't buy a bunch of rocks. It is all in the link above and the threads linked from that one.


For how long does a lapping film package lasts though? Isn't it more iconomical just to buy a few stones and be done with it for pretty much the rest of your life instead of keep buying lapping films even though I don't think I would sharpen my razors that often. A while ago I saw some guy ( I believe he died last December) on a Facebook shaving group that was very well regarded as a hone master and newbies wanted his help for sharpening their razors or for an advice and every time someone mentions something about lapping films he was going nuclear and saying that the true edge comes from good stones and that only people who know nothing about a true razor edge will talk about lapping films.

He really had a nice collection of great and expensive natural stones and I don't know why he attacked everyone who ever mentioned lapping films. I guess some people are taking this hobbie like every other hobbie way to serious than I think and that everyone thinks his way of doing something is the best there is.

I would definitely use my lapping films before trying any kind of stone though. I bought mine from Aliexpress a few years ago and I think they would do just fine. I also need to buy some diamond paste and use it on my inexpensive strop, which is also from Aliexpress and keep my Tony clean.

Btw, is there any other more convenient way to keep the strop steady while using it instead of drilling a hole in any of my furniture and instal a hook?
 
@Medivh, a set of lapping films should last you about 10 to 15 full honing sessions. A straight razor should only need to be put through a lapping film progression once, provided that it is then maintained on diamond pasted balsa. One set of lapping films should be enought for about your first 10 to 15 SR's.

If you maintain your SR on a pasted flexible strop, you will need the periodically refresh the edge on lapping film or stone. The reason for this is that a pasted flexible strop will put convexity in the edge's bevel that, over time, reduces the edge's keenness.

I have bevel set and honed about 50 SR's now. I bevel set on stone, progress through lapping film and finish with a diamond pasted balsa progression. I love shaving with the edges I get from the diamond pasted balsa strops. Others may find them too keen for their liking, just not me.

I tie the bitter end of my strop to the bathroom door handle or it could be tied to a towel rail if it is strong enough.
 
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For how long does a lapping film package lasts though? Isn't it more iconomical just to buy a few stones and be done with it for pretty much the rest of your life instead of keep buying lapping films even though I don't think I would sharpen my razors that often. A while ago I saw some guy ( I believe he died last December) on a Facebook shaving group that was very well regarded as a hone master and newbies wanted his help for sharpening their razors or for an advice and every time someone mentions something about lapping films he was going nuclear and saying that the true edge comes from good stones and that only people who know nothing about a true razor edge will talk about lapping films.

He really had a nice collection of great and expensive natural stones and I don't know why he attacked everyone who ever mentioned lapping films. I guess some people are taking this hobbie like every other hobbie way to serious than I think and that everyone thinks his way of doing something is the best there is.

I would definitely use my lapping films before trying any kind of stone though. I bought mine from Aliexpress a few years ago and I think they would do just fine. I also need to buy some diamond paste and use it on my inexpensive strop, which is also from Aliexpress and keep my Tony clean.

Btw, is there any other more convenient way to keep the strop steady while using it instead of drilling a hole in any of my furniture and instal a hook?
Just keep in mind that the substrate you apply any paste to is really important. You can probably strop on a balsa loaded with diamond indefinitely, but if apply it to leather a foil burr will develop, and you will probably end up with an harsh edge. Science of sharp has some really good info on the subject.
The Bismarck blade type is hard to dislike. It is also easy to maintain and hone.
 
Thanks for the advices and tips. I might ask some more questions once I get more involved into the SR. I've looked around the Revisor website and decided to grab a NOS vintage Revisor instead of the modern one. It kinda looks the same and NOS costs just a few euro more, but somehow I think the vintage one is going to be a bit better in terms of manufacturing and maybe steel quality as well.

I might not know much about SR razors, but what i've learned in the past few years is that if a manufacturer is offering both vintage and modern SRs, the vintage ones tend to be a bit better made and overall better shavers. I could be wrong though, since that's what i've heard and only time will tell whatever this theory is right or wrong for this particular razors and in general.

This is the one i've picked instead and I will most likely get the Aust as well at some point.

ES-0012.jpg
 
For how long does a lapping film package lasts though? Isn't it more iconomical just to buy a few stones and be done with it for pretty much the rest of your life instead of keep buying lapping films even though I don't think I would sharpen my razors that often. A while ago I saw some guy ( I believe he died last December) on a Facebook shaving group that was very well regarded as a hone master and newbies wanted his help for sharpening their razors or for an advice and every time someone mentions something about lapping films he was going nuclear and saying that the true edge comes from good stones and that only people who know nothing about a true razor edge will talk about lapping films.

He really had a nice collection of great and expensive natural stones and I don't know why he attacked everyone who ever mentioned lapping films. I guess some people are taking this hobbie like every other hobbie way to serious than I think and that everyone thinks his way of doing something is the best there is.

I would definitely use my lapping films before trying any kind of stone though. I bought mine from Aliexpress a few years ago and I think they would do just fine. I also need to buy some diamond paste and use it on my inexpensive strop, which is also from Aliexpress and keep my Tony clean.

Btw, is there any other more convenient way to keep the strop steady while using it instead of drilling a hole in any of my furniture and instal a hook?
It's probably safe to say a great finishing stone in the right hands will beat a film edge most if not all the time. The challenge is finding a great finisher and learning how to use it. This becomes less of an issue if you are using the diamond pasted balsa method at the end of your progression. My experience has been that a good "Method" edge is pretty close to a very good natural edge. Different, but good.

I have honed 20 or 21 razors from bevel set to finish on film (8.5x11 sheets cut in thirds) and I still have at least one strip of each grit left untouched. However the bevel setting ranges have definitely worn out quicker and I'm considering buying a stone in the 1k range rather than more film.
 
For how long does a lapping film package lasts though? Isn't it more iconomical just to buy a few stones and be done with it for pretty much the rest of your life instead of keep buying lapping films even though I don't think I would sharpen my razors that often. A while ago I saw some guy ( I believe he died last December) on a Facebook shaving group that was very well regarded as a hone master and newbies wanted his help for sharpening their razors or for an advice and every time someone mentions something about lapping films he was going nuclear and saying that the true edge comes from good stones and that only people who know nothing about a true razor edge will talk about lapping films.

He really had a nice collection of great and expensive natural stones and I don't know why he attacked everyone who ever mentioned lapping films. I guess some people are taking this hobbie like every other hobbie way to serious than I think and that everyone thinks his way of doing something is the best there is.

I would definitely use my lapping films before trying any kind of stone though. I bought mine from Aliexpress a few years ago and I think they would do just fine. I also need to buy some diamond paste and use it on my inexpensive strop, which is also from Aliexpress and keep my Tony clean.

Btw, is there any other more convenient way to keep the strop steady while using it instead of drilling a hole in any of my furniture and instal a hook?
You will get at least a dozen sessions from a piece of film and some guys get twice that. Each 8-1/2" x 11" sheet is cut into three pieces. Your stones will wear from honing and wear even more from lapping. They last a long time but they are not eternal. They also break if you drop them, sometimes. Alright, you will likely never actually wear out a stone. But you might break one. And film only costs about a buck fifty a sheet and makes how many razors sharp? Compare that to the cost of good quality stones divided by the total number of razors you will hone, even assuming you never damage a stone or wear one out or get bored with one and buy a replacement to see if it is better.

People can be very intensely partisan about what they regard as The One True Way when it comes to honing. This is especially true when someone has spent thousands of dollars for rocks. He first of all obviously happens to believe strongly that he is pursuing the correct dragon or he wouldn't have spent all that money. Second, by convincing others to do the same thing, he is validating his own choices. There is a lot of psychology involved. The fact of the matter is, no stone edge I have ever shaved with can compete with a full blown Method edge in terms of sharpness defined by sheer cutting ability, and very few stone edges approach a Method edge in comfort and only the very best will exceed them. These "very best" stone edges are not routinely turned out by just anybody. The learning curve stretches into infinity. Film and balsa do not require much learning, just following directions exactly in every tiny detail. That's all it takes. By the time you hone your third razor you should pretty much have it nailed. Anyway the best way to deal with zealots and heretics who don't agree with me is to simply smile politely and try not to set them off. Some people simply are not among the chosen.

See what I did there? Although yes it is obvious to me that this is the superior method. I will tell you a secret, just don't tell anyone. A good set of synthetic stones followed by the balsa progression can create an edge that is indistinguishable from an edge formed on lapping film and followed by the balsa. For a beginner who only hones his own razors and doesn't have buckets full of them, film makes economic sense, and bypasses the whole lapping of the stones thing. Film, or stones. Either one works, and after the balsa, there is no difference between the edges.

I am sorry to have to inform you of this, but there is a very good chance that your ali express film is not very good. Maybe it is, my suspicion is it isn't. If it is genuine 3M plain back, full size sheets, it is the real deal. There are a few other sources that are good. Many I suspect are just 3M 261 type film bought in bulk cheaply and rebranded/repackaged. I get my film from NanoLapTech. Diamond paste from TechDiamondTools. ThorLabs is another good source. Plus they send you "Lab Snacks". So if by chance your aliexpress film sucks, don't blow film off for good. You might just have the wrong stuff. Proper film really does a nice job and offers much for little.

If you go with stones, I highly recommend the Naniwa Superstones for your progression to 12k which is just barely coarser than 1μ film. For your coarser stones A Shapton Kuromaku or Suehiro 320 grit for heavy edge repair followed by a 600 grit Chosera and maybe a 1k and a 3k Chosera. Then the regular Naniwa Superstones for your 8k and 12k rocks. My suggestion is to run far, far, and fast, away from any cheap stones, such as King, Bear Moo, Sharp Pebble, or no-name knockoffs of these. Skip the Jnats and Coticules and exotic slates and even the Arkies for now. High quality synthetics are easier and quicker to learn. There's that learn thing again. Make some good edges first, then explore naturals if you feel called that way. Many honers really enjoy using naturals and there is nothing wrong with that. But they didn't make silent treetopping edges on their first go with them, you can believe that.

Not a good idea to paste your leather strop. If you have a cheap one, use that initially because you are very likely to butcher it up pretty bad while learning. But don't paste it. There are many options for hanging the strop. You will probably end up screwing coat hooks to the wall but for starters you can just hang them with an "S" hook from a door hinge or towel bar.

Read the thread I linked in my previous post, end to end. THat is important. Then the threads linked inside that thread, which go into the specific nuts and bolts of The Method. Read them end to end, as well. Follow the directions in their final version exactly. Much of The Method goes back many years but parts have evolved under testing and experimentation by others, not just myself. I didn't invent this, I just sort of shoved it all together. I learned about film from a guy. I learned about balsa and diamond paste from a guy. I learned to set a bevel from a guy. I stand on the shoulders of those who came before, and others stand with me. Anyway because The Method has evolved and even now has the potential for evolution in some areas, but some areas are pretty much written in stone, you need to read the threads end to end. There are so many details covered that a rewrite and consolidation would also be very long. The guiding principle philosophy is to have a detailed set of instructions that eliminates all guessing and choice and subjectivity, short circuiting the normal learning process. SKIPPING THE WHOLE "LEARNING" THING. Learning to hone can take years, and many stop along the way, spent, done, satisfied with so-so, adequate edges. Some go on and become true zen masters, artists, mystics who are one with the sacred stones, blah blah blah and do indeed create great edges. YEARS. With The Method, a newbie usually creates a better than professional quality edge on the first or second attempt. That is, if he is capable of following instructions to the letter.

The Method, at least initially, is not LEARNING. It is DOING. It is paint-by-the-numbers, for razors. Watch every show by Bob Ross or go to art school and in a few years, you can make a very good copy, if you are talented, of the Last Supper or the Mona Lisa or Dogs Playing Poker or some other masterpiece. Or you can get the paint by the numbers version and follow the instructions, stay inside the lines, and never use the Burnt Sienna in a space that calls for color #17, and it will look great hanging in the living room of your double wide. Learning is fun, fascinating, stimulating, engaging. But there is a relative lack of instant gratification. You want to shave with superior edges NOW. You want to learn to do the fancy Kung Fu today, not sweep the temple steps and meditate and make tea for the next 7 years. Okay maybe Kung Fu doesn't work that way, but honing can very much work that way. You can bypass all the mysticism and artistry if you want, cut to the chase, and make your razor sharper than a pro would make it. Even the prima dona petrophile expert who says lapping film is blasphemy.

So read, read, read. All your questions are already answered, including the many that you don't know to ask yet. The Method is in use by many, and is under constant scrutiny and review. The threads are full of testimonials of happy noobs with crazy sharp razors and great shaves.

The Method is not the only way, but it is IMHO the best way, the cheapest way, the fastest way, to get your first and best edges. Just remember it isn't The Method if you cherry pick only the parts you like or are convenient, and freestyle the rest. And you can indeed freestyle it or in fact follow anybody else's methods and yeah you can mix and match and cherry pick and roll the dice and experiment before you know the basics. But it will take longer and you will end up buying a lot of extra stuff with money you could have bought more razors and brushes and strops with.
 
Thanks for the advices and tips. I might ask some more questions once I get more involved into the SR. I've looked around the Revisor website and decided to grab a NOS vintage Revisor instead of the modern one. It kinda looks the same and NOS costs just a few euro more, but somehow I think the vintage one is going to be a bit better in terms of manufacturing and maybe steel quality as well.

I might not know much about SR razors, but what i've learned in the past few years is that if a manufacturer is offering both vintage and modern SRs, the vintage ones tend to be a bit better made and overall better shavers. I could be wrong though, since that's what i've heard and only time will tell whatever this theory is right or wrong for this particular razors and in general.

This is the one i've picked instead and I will most likely get the Aust as well at some point.

View attachment 1337142
You would like that razor, and indeed most other razors using that same blade. I suspect all of the Solingen blades of that pattern are all made at the same forge, regardless of brand and model, with the bling applied by the individual makers.
 
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