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Oil the Threads of a DE Razor?

Old thread, but great discussion.

I have a coated head (well, cap) inbound that will be mated to a coated handle. I can definitely see how lubing those threads will help prevent, or at least reduce, wear to both parts where they mate.

As for lubing my other stainless steel, brass, or nickel plated threads, I don't think it would hurt either way. If I had a precious metal plating over nickel, however, (i.e. silver, gold, or rhodium) I would treat those parts the same as the coated parts above, and for the same reasons.
 
IMHO threads are threads are threads.
Having said that, it has been my experience as a Machine Repairman in a major implement manufacturing plant for 30 yrs. that anything that has moving parts will last MUCH longer with lubrication than without.
So, whether it be a ( 2 pc. 3 pc. TTO etc.) I feel any razor that will be put together and taken apart each time you decide to shave, (and that could be as many as 4 or more times each shave) and could be more than once a day depending on your beard growth and your shaving routine, should IMHO be lubricated. And due to the fact that it is in contact with my one and only face it should be food grade lube.
So I use mineral oil and don't use it each time I shave but do use it each time I do a major clean which is around once or twice a month.
So if your lubing your adjustable, (which in fact are the threads) why not your 2pc. 3pc. etc.?
Again threads are threads are threads, A thin coat of mineral oil once in a while certainly won't hurt your precision tool or your face. Not to mention your prolonging the longevity of you razor. (oil between the threads lets the two materials ride on the oil thus less wear and tear on the threads, no matter what the mating materials are, whether plastic, brass, chrome, nickel etc.)
I can't figure why anyone would want to put a sealant on your razors threads. Seams that would only gunk up the works. Not to mention all the nasties that would adhere to the threads and further wear and or make things not as smooth as they should be when screwing them together or apart.
Just my 2 cents worth IMHO.
:a5:
 
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At the risk of umping an old thread, I'm curious why those who do lubricate their 2 or 3 piece razors only choose to do so once a month or so. Does this mean you also don't disassemble and clean your razor after every shave?

As for me, I shave at night. After shaving, I take apart my razor and rinse the parts. After drying the parts, I add a drop of beard oil to the threads on the razor head and some additional drops of beard oil in the handle shaft.

The beard oil I use for this lists mineral oil first among its ingredients. Best of all, it was part of a set that included a tube of shaving cream and a tin of aftershave balm, which I bought for about $1.50.
 
At the risk of umping an old thread, I'm curious why those who do lubricate their 2 or 3 piece razors only choose to do so once a month or so. Does this mean you also don't disassemble and clean your razor after every shave?
I clean and dry the razor after every shave but that is more related to hard water issues which cause a build up of scum very quickly. The blade gets a wipe between tissue and flipped ready for the next shave.
The threads are oiled once weekly with light machine oil as it reduces friction on the threads. Mineral oil will be just as good and is readily available on supermarket shelves.
This maintenance issue comes up regularly.
 
I use SuperLube grease. It's food grade, non-toxic and I use it for may things.
I was very adamant about this for my R41, but am more lax with my aluminum and stainless razors.
I usually only disassemble my razor for blade changes, which is about once every month or two...
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While I hold no real opinion on the validity of the claim I read somewhere on the Internet (so it must be true) that many modern DE razor heads are manufactured from zamak and chrome plated. If the chrome plating was not properly applied to the razor to begin with, leaving the underlying zamak exposed, it could corrode and result in breakage. Apparently zamak is subject to corroding, hard water was brought up as being a likely culprit and using mineral oil (or some some other kind of oil) was suggested as one way of preventing this corrosion. If I was concerned about the chrome plating on the bottom side of my razor head I'd shoot it with a few coats of clear enamel and get on with Life as I understand it.

Once again, I have no opinion on any of this, I just felt like chipping in.
 

haggis

Contributor
Does this mean you also don't disassemble and clean your razor after every shave?
I believe I may have cleaned a razor once. I think it was around 1995. Slight exaggeration but only slight. I recently went down a couple rabbit holes and ended up with some Renaissance Wax and Ballistol (which I don't seem to mind the odor of) so in addition to waxing various things I am inspired by this thread to lubricate the various razors that have mysteriously appeared in my den this year.
 
I clean my razors once every few months.
I never disassemble after each shave.

After a clean, I apply one drop of silicone lubricant to the thread since I don't clean my razors often and want to protect the thread from potential damage.

I don't baby my stuff at all so thought I should take this precaution as a bare minimum.
 
After you clean and disinfect the razor (if needed); I apply a good car paste wax to it. Shines great and provides good protection. MAAS metal polish works too.
 
This is a good read from the instructions that came with my Merkur. It has their recommendation that threads should be oiled occasionally and what types of oil they recommend and why.
View attachment 669992
So that says "not edible oil" so do they mean not vegetable oil? Or does mineral oil count as "edible". I would think they mean cooking oils. Olive, vegetable, conola, etc.
 
While I hold no real opinion on the validity of the claim I read somewhere on the Internet (so it must be true) that many modern DE razor heads are manufactured from zamak and chrome plated. If the chrome plating was not properly applied to the razor to begin with, leaving the underlying zamak exposed, it could corrode and result in breakage. Apparently zamak is subject to corroding, hard water was brought up as being a likely culprit and using mineral oil (or some some other kind of oil) was suggested as one way of preventing this corrosion. If I was concerned about the chrome plating on the bottom side of my razor head I'd shoot it with a few coats of clear enamel and get on with Life as I understand it.

Once again, I have no opinion on any of this, I just felt like chipping in.
Another way I use for vintage razors after cleaning any corrosion off of the brass where plating failed on vintages was to use clear nail polish. Works great!!
 
For light lubrication jobs, I often use knitting machine oil:


I used to use the machine oil my wife uses on her several sewing machines, but the advantage of knitting machine oil is that it’s scourable, unlike the sewing machine oil - handy if you get it on your shirt!

I‘ve also got this:
Regin REG-Z22 Zoom Spout Fan Oil: Amazon.co.uk: DIY & Tools - https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00NTWLN70/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 which is a decent lube.
 
Organic oils will oxidize and turn rancid over time, and petroleum distillates are generally considered unsafe for prolonged contact with anything containing DNA, so a light, food-grade mineral oil (yes, it's a thing), is the best lubricant for both preserving (reducing oxidation) and decreasing friction between moving or threaded parts. This Japanese katana, preserved with just regular cleaning with traditional choji oil (mineral and a few drops of clove oil mixed), is over 625 years old:

 
So that says "not edible oil" so do they mean not vegetable oil? Or does mineral oil count as "edible". I would think they mean cooking oils. Olive, vegetable, conola, etc.
I have mineral oil from walgreens in the laxative section...If you are looking for food safe oil that won't go rancid on you...If you have wood utensils it works great to keep them from drying out.
 
I have mineral oil from walgreens in the laxative section...If you are looking for food safe oil that won't go rancid on you...If you have wood utensils it works great to keep them from drying out.
Yes I have "mineral oil with something else" for my cutting boards.
 
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