What's new
  • Guest
    As per our long standing policy of not permitting medical advice on the forum - all threads concerning the Coronavirus will be locked.
    For more info on the coronavirus please see the link below:
    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/summary.html

Oil the Threads of a DE Razor?

I've been told by @Ozziedoc (who has been very helpful and seems well-informed) that for pot metal, in my case a Muhle R41 2011, silicone grease is the right solution. I read up on it a couple of days ago, and it seems like the correct answer for frail pot metal threads. (I treasure my R41.) Tomorrow I will receive 2oz of silicone grease, bought solely to keep my R41 in good working order.

:blushing: Thanks pbrmhl. I saw this thread but decided not to respond lest people start thinking I'm a shill for silicone grease companies.
 

pbrmhl

Contributor
:blushing: Thanks pbrmhl. I saw this thread but decided not to respond lest people start thinking I'm a shill for silicone grease companies.
I'll shill for you! And I didn't even know what silicone grease was until a couple of days ago... Moreover, you only mentioned one company and, given its price here in the US, I went with another brand (who's name I can't remember so, if I'm shilling, I'm not doing a very good job...).
 
I don't use "firearms lubricant" on a razor, unless I planned on going "full auto" mode with it at the range. :laugh:

Likewise, I wouldn't use "plumbers grease" on it, unless I needed the razor to fix the kitchen sink. :lol:

To to keep water from staining the metal on my razor, one could easily swish it around in mason jar of Barbicide/water solution or 70% rubbing alcohol. The alcohol in both mixtures AIDS in water evaporation, including inside the handle. Barbicide also claims that it has anti-rust qualities within it's chemical composition.

If I absolutely had to use an oil because my OCHD was kicking in, I'd use a "food grade" type oil on a tool that I was using to cut the top layer of my skin off. I certainly wouldnt rub gun oil or plumbers grease into a fresh cut on my hand or arm, so why would I use it where it might get into my freshly razor-burned epidermis on my face? Perhaps what others here have already suggested; a drop of mineral oil would be preferred.

Mineral oil is used for many things, including wooden cutting boards for food preparation, as well as injested in small amounts for specific medical reasons. That alone makes it acceptable in my book to have some of it possibly transfer onto my shaved face.
I keep a jelly jar full of rubbing alcohol to swish after each shave. The water evaporates with the alcohol. Once a week I take a toothbrush to it to get rid of any remaining soap.
 
Most modern shotguns have screw in choke tubes in the muzzle. These are subjected to much abuse, heat, and constant screwing in & out over extended use. Several companies manufacture anti-seize, lubricants for the threads of these tubes. I can't see why these lubes wouldn't work well for the threads of our razors.

Ron I
 
I only use a lubricant in my vintage adjustables. Maybe a of drop of tuff-gluide here and there every couple of months keeps their operation free and correct. a tiny drop goes a long way.

I might consider a drop in the thread of stainless razors going forward. I generally dry them quite well but you never know where you might miss a little moisture that could convert to surface corrosion. So far I haven't been seeing it though.
 
Most modern shotguns have screw in choke tubes in the muzzle. These are subjected to much abuse, heat, and constant screwing in & out over extended use. Several companies manufacture anti-seize, lubricants for the threads of these tubes. I can't see why these lubes wouldn't work well for the threads of our razors.

Ron I
You might want to check the Safety Data sheets for some of those anti-seizes. Great for their intended uses, not so good if some gets on you while shaving. Also most of them are highly staining.

Silicone grease ticks all the right boxes for lubricating the threads as well as galvanic corrosion protection.
 
I don't think its been mentioned, but Vaseline or other petroleum jelly would probably be a good choice.

But again, I don't think that lubricating the threads is necessary.
 
I like the suggestion of using mineral oil. It's food grade so no danger if it gets on your face while shaving. And it should do the job. I'll fill each screw hole in my handles and dump it out after a bit. That should give me plenty of coverage. I'll also put some on the razor cap threads as well so both parts are covered. I figure repeating once a month should be more than enough to make them last a lifetime. I bet I could get same performance by doing it quarterly instead of monthly.
 

Raven Koenes

My precious!
Contributor
This is a good read from the instructions that came with my Merkur. It has their recommendation that threads should be oiled occasionally and what types of oil they recommend and why.
$RwtMtJW.jpg
 
Has anyone tried Frog Lube on the threads yet?
This made me think of Ballistol. I had some that I bought for a gun lube, but I couldn't stand the smell. Apparently it is a love it or hate it smell. Anyway it's a fantastic lube, organic, and would be a good fit for this purpose...IF you don't mind your razor smelling like very well used sweat socks.
 
If you -must- lubricate the threads of a razor, use a silicone based grease. Specifically, get one that's salt water rated. It will resist the chlorine in treated water. (You can buy them at pool supply places as well as marine outfitters/boat shops)
 
Top Bottom