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Oil free Turkey Frying

Today was Memorial Day and it was 93 degrees and I fried a Turkey? What was I thinking. My wife bought me a Char-broil Oil-less Turkey fryer for Christmas because I am allergic to Peanut Oil. Now being from the south, frying turkeys was a way of life. I tried it out today and was really impressed. You may have seen these advertised.

Here are some pictures, what do you think?:



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Mmm that bird looks good! I love fried turkey.
I wouldn't have thought those infrared fryers would work that well. Does it take the standard amount of time as an oil fryer?
 
Thanks for the question. I was afraid for a minute there that I was going down in a sinking ship. :lol:

It is quicker in that you don't have to wait an hour for three gallons of oil to heat up before you can start cooking. The actual cooking time is a little longer. Oil Frying requires 3 minutes per pound, however the Oil-less Fryer it takes 10 minutes per pound. There is also a capacity limit. The Oil-less fryer is limited to a 16 lb turkey.

I prepared the bird the same way I always do, I injected it and applied a rub the night before. One good advantage that I noticed is that the rub didn't fry off like it does with Oil frying. All in all, it was very similar to oil frying but not exactly like it.
 

ouch

Stjynnkii membörd dummpsjterd
Moderator Emeritus
You know, there are other oils besides peanut oil.
 
Thanks for the question. I was afraid for a minute there that I was going down in a sinking ship. :lol:

It is quicker in that you don't have to wait an hour for three gallons of oil to heat up before you can start cooking. The actual cooking time is a little longer. Oil Frying requires 3 minutes per pound, however the Oil-less Fryer it takes 10 minutes per pound. There is also a capacity limit. The Oil-less fryer is limited to a 16 lb turkey.

I prepared the bird the same way I always do, I injected it and applied a rub the night before. One good advantage that I noticed is that the rub didn't fry off like it does with Oil frying. All in all, it was very similar to oil frying but not exactly like it.
Happy to help :001_smile

Cant complain with the time. 10 minutes a pound pretty much cuts the time in half, if a bit more. Plus you don't have to wait for the oil to cool down which takes forever and store it for the next time you use it. And probably the biggest advantage is you cant misjudge the amount of oil and burn your deck down! :lol:

I never would have thought it would work so well.
Thanks for the review.

Very kool
 
You know, there are other oils besides peanut oil.
But aren't all of the other oils suitable for frying more expensive then peanut oil? I have only ever uses safflower oil to fry and seem to remember it being somewhat more expensive then peanut. Or maybe I just remember it only came in smaller bottles :001_smile
 

ouch

Stjynnkii membörd dummpsjterd
Moderator Emeritus
But aren't all of the other oils suitable for frying more expensive then peanut oil? I have only ever uses safflower oil to fry and seem to remember it being somewhat more expensive then peanut. Or maybe I just remember it only came in smaller bottles :001_smile
You're kidding, right? I can get a gallon of Wesson oil (corn, canola, or vegetable) for $3.99 on sale. A gallon of peanut oil is pushing twenty bucks.

Peanut oil is one of the most expensive oils for frying.
 
You know, there are other oils besides peanut oil.
This, by no means, means that I have given up frying turkeys. Once this gets in your blood and you can't just quit COLD TURKEY.:lol:
 
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My neighbor got one of those Big Easys last year, so I gave it a try. It was pretty cold and windy outside when I did it and it took forever to get done. The end result was a good juicy Turkey, but in my opinion not really comparable to deep frying. My neighbor has since done bone-in Pork loin roasts in it as well as a Beef rib roast, both of which he said were very good. Oh and for the record, I've never used peanut oil for deep frying always just use corn or canola.
 
You're kidding, right? I can get a gallon of Wesson oil (corn, canola, or vegetable) for $3.99 on sale. A gallon of peanut oil is pushing twenty bucks.

Peanut oil is one of the most expensive oils for frying.
I don't buy many different oils, and have never bought peanut oil. I did not think those (corn, canola, or vegetable) oils were good for frying. I thought peanut oil is mostly used because it has a higher smoke point and is a good frying oil. Oils like sunflower and safflower oil I have heard are good frying oils too.

I ask because I don't really know. I don't do much deep frying. Just asking based on things I have heard.
 
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I don't buy many different oils, and have never bought peanut oil. I did not think those (corn, canola, or vegetable) oils were good for frying. I thought peanut oil is mostly used because it has a higher smoke point and is a good frying oil. Oils like sunflower and safflower oil I have heard are good frying oils too.

I ask because I don't really know. I don't do much deep frying. Just asking based on things I have heard.
Joshua, you were right. I got to looking into the different oils and it seems that Safflower and sunflower oils do meet the low smoke requirement and like you thought, they cost more than peanut oil.

Having said that, Ouch was also correct when he stated, one can also use cheaper oils, the only difference is that you can only used them once because they break down quicker. While peanut, safflower and sunflower oils can be used several times.

But back to the OP, OH that is me:lol:.....Here are the pluses that I have observed from my one use.
1.The Big Easy produced a more tender meat than fried turkeys. I have notice that the legs and wings on the fried turkey sometimes get too done and are almost uneatable. The breast meat cooked in the Oil-less fryer was the most tender that I have ever had.
2. Faster cooking time because you don't have to wait for oil to heat up.
3. A whole lot easier clean up. I just had to empty the drip pan and pull out the stainless steel liner and wash it out in the sink.
 
My neighbor got one of those Big Easys last year, so I gave it a try. It was pretty cold and windy outside when I did it and it took forever to get done. The end result was a good juicy Turkey, but in my opinion not really comparable to deep frying. My neighbor has since done bone-in Pork loin roasts in it as well as a Beef rib roast, both of which he said were very good. Oh and for the record, I've never used peanut oil for deep frying always just use corn or canola.
Thanks for the tip, the next time I fry a turkey I plan to use canola oil.
 
Having said that, Ouch was also correct when he stated, one can also use cheaper oils, the only difference is that you can only used them once because they break down quicker. While peanut, safflower and sunflower oils can be used several times.
Kool. Thanks for doin the leg work on that.

Sounds like it was a good investment then. The only question for you is what are you gonna cook next? :biggrin1:
 
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