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Oakmoss sensitivity?

Hey fellow Fragheads!
I have been trying for a long time to track down my problem partly because it is hard to even describe.

The TLDR is: I have a lingering burn in my nose up to 24hrs that I can only describe as similar to a prescription strength nasal spray without a distinct smell. I can "smell" it immediately on many vintage colognes and always thought it was because they were cheap.

My journey to track this down started with lavender. I am still not ruling it out as a contributor as it is prominent in all classic fragrances. So I pulled out some pure lavender finally and sprayed it on one wrist and a known problem fragrance on the other. Lavender is supposed to be a top and heart note and maybe dry down to powder, I can't see how it would hang on without some help.

What about florals drying down to "powder" smell? Again the florals aren't in the base so I can't see how this is the problem. I love natural rose scents which I know is unusual. That one may be a contributor, but if I am smelling powder something is keeping it stuck. I will note that what I am smelling, when I smell it on other people is usually a female and it is overpowering. Most feminine fragrances are very floral. So is it the combination of too many florals maybe?

Coumarin is in the base of many fragrances, I wonder about that one. Nope, it's in 90% according to one source and doesn't sound like the culprit.

Then we come to oakmoss. I though it was supposed to smell dirty and greenish and be a fixative. I kept dancing around this as the source for a long time, but it is in the base and it is a fixative. I wonder if that is why I can detect something in my nose, but not smell it 24hrs later? There is a "thicker" feeling to the smell for 8-12hrs. Some of these fragrances that burn my nose also don't wash off, further pointing to something with holding power.

I have had good luck with most unique soap and aftershave combos. The confusing one for me is B&M Fern. It is supposed to be based on an old scent and if it is called fern then it is a fougere. But I don't get any nasal burn, or floral, just pure green. I wish I knew what it was based on because that would help. SV Felce Aromatica is the soap I match it with and they don't list oakmoss in their description. Classic fougere structure is supposed to have oakmoss in the base so I am confused how a classic scent wouldn't have oakmoss. I only have a limited number of actual fragrances to smell, but the ones I gravitate toward would be considered modern and not classic. Amber woody is safe for me.

Thanks for any suggestions
 
I know the ones that are affecting me have real oakmoss, compliant or not. However, that might explain why Fern doesn't bother me. If I could just figure this out for sure, I could more products that I know use the synthetic. But if it is a floral component, I am going to waist more money. Thanks
 
Not me. I got oakmoss (and tree moss) essential oils off ebay.
I think I am going to give that a try. From my continuing research it appears it might be the lavender all along, but with something keeping it stuck. I found a description of certain varieties of Lavender as smelling medicinal and more spraying and smelling is agreeing.
 

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I think I am going to give that a try. From my continuing research it appears it might be the lavender all along, but with something keeping it stuck. I found a description of certain varieties of Lavender as smelling medicinal and more spraying and smelling is agreeing.

I was trying to learn about notes by isolating them. Oakmoss EO is a thick, sticky tarry fluid. Never could get liquid to absorb/sublimated it, but now I have polysorbate-40, need to try again.


AA
 
Appreciate the replies, I found a long video that covers a lot of things. It seems like the Fougere scent is an accord. Once the three principal components are mixed, they tend to stay together. Apparently, it's not like something that separates and has to be shaken to mix things up. It appears that those three chemicals together stay stuck to my skin and irritate my nose for however long they last. So I guess I won't worry about the oakmoss and continue to avoid anything labeled Fougere or that has an obvious fougere accord. No judgment against anybody who enjoys these, I think there is something physically going on with my scent receptors that is making me smell, or perceive, this differently. Excuse me while I go huff some Colonia. :wacko:
 
A fairly small percentage of people have a sensitivity to real oakmoss. Most rose scents are actually from a geranium plant (geraniol, not the geranium flowers, from the leaves of a bushy plant). Older barbershop type scents often have these, plus lavender, plus citrus notes (citrol, limonene, limanool).
 
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