What's new

Noob brush Restoration QUESTIONS(Can it be restored)

OK guys, I need a little help determining if I can or even should restore two fantastic vinatage brushes.
View attachment 395036
A Rubberset 504 Pure Badger and Bone Handled Ever-Ready 210! I love they way they look, and I'm really excited about getting started on each of them, but I have some concerns.... First, the Rubberset has a beautiful Butterscotch handle, but it has numerous cracks which in my opinion add a ton of charactor. I'm worried that if I go through the trouble restoring it, that it may not make it through many more winters. Have many of you confronted a situation like this? Is there a fix or does it need one at all?

View attachment 395037View attachment 395038

Lastly, the Ever-Ready has a small crack about 2mm long going from north to south on the Rubber top of the brush. I'm wondering if I can use my dremel to open the final opening to negate this crack or if I should just leave it and hope a little epoxy fills it? Or should I just leave it alone as a display piece? Any suggestions would be greatly accepted!
$P1000040.jpg

Thanks a bunch guys!

Matt
 
That crazing on the rubberset is pretty normal and one of the things that gives the bakelite character, I wouldn't worry about it. The other is probably fine too, but you could stablize it with epoxy, I just don't know how good it would look. Dr Dulcamara has great success with doing that though.
 
Are these brushes heirlooms or otherwise represent sentimental value?

Mike's question is spot on. If these brushes hold sentimental value to you, I'm sure the consensus among experienced restorers would be to proceed very carefully.

That crazing on the rubberset is pretty normal and one of the things that gives the bakelite character, I wouldn't worry about it. The other is probably fine too, but you could stablize it with epoxy, I just don't know how good it would look. Dr Dulcamara has great success with doing that though.

I agree on the crazing-- it's relatively common on vintage plastics and usually isn't a problem. With respect to both brushes, unless I discovered structural problems once the knots have been removed, I wouldn't bother with attempting to stabilize the cracks. That's just my opinion, though, YMMV.

Good luck with your restorations!
 

Mike H

Instagram Famous
OK guys, I need a little help determining if I can or even should restore two fantastic vinatage brushes.

They are not sentimental items, picked them both up over the last few weeks for $12.00.

Then you can and should restore these!


The butterscotch is just oxidation, so if you want to keep it that color, just do limited polishing on it. They should turn out great.
 
After you get the old knot out, turn the big Eveready upside down and sand it flat until the crack is gone and use a little larger replacement knot. You will love it.
 
I already bought everything good around there. LOL. I bought a Rubberset 400 for $7 at that antique mall on the road to Rolla that looks like an old west town.
 
On Saturdays, there is a fantastic Swap Meet at Olde Towne Antiques in Doolittle, found a $3.00 cased Fatboy and 5 $1.00 Gillette New's!
 
Hello.
I would not want to cut the ferrule, because that will change the forms, proportions and appearance of the brush.
My advice is to remove the knot carefully, very carefully. Sanding inside or brushing with the little brass brush of the dremel. Then enter epoxy into the crack and wet sanding the protruding part, spinning in a drill, when hardened. After that, polishing and repainting. Leaving a thin layer of epoxy on the inside of the ferrule, can be useful.
The epoxy can be tinted, but I think it affects the ability to harden. If the crack is thin, transparent epoxy should be enough.
You can also make an inner ring if the ferrule does not have one. And install it inside to protect the ferrule of the knot expansion when wet. But if the ferrule does not have the seat for the ring, this would be difficult, I think.


Well, hope it helps
 
Top Bottom