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No matter how inexhaustible resources may seem

ouch

Stjynnkii membörd dummpsjterd
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No matter how inexhaustible resources may seem, they are not — and this extinct bird is proof of that.

On September 1, 1914, the last passenger pigeon died. They once numbered about five billion, and flocks could blot out the sun for hours.

$Martha,_a_Passenger_Pigeon.jpg
 
This is a nice, observant, and poignant post. It's humbling to think that a species so endemic at one time could be literally hunted to extinction.

Don
 
The fate of the passenger pigeon isn't the only sign of exhaustible resources. I hope for the best, but....
 

Mike H

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Tasmanian Tiger (Thylacine), the largest carnivorous marsupial.



Thylacines were declared a protected species in 1936, the same year the last known specimen died.
 
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I just read where over hunting and habitat destruction did this species in. I'm not against wise use of resources, by any means, but I have also seen the results of over zealous conservation efforts, too. Some species of geese have gone from having limited numbers to being completely overpopulated. Hunting these species in limited numbers for too long caused destruction of their breeding habitat, which in turn causes a loss in population. Red snapper is another species that has been protected too long, and now they are endangering the population of other reef fish due to their aggressive nature and high numbers. I can remember catching lane snapper, mangrove snapper, beeliners and trigger fish with a handful of reds thrown in, and now you can hardly catch anything but reds. Eventually, red snapper will wipe not only the other reef fish out, but will also begin to hurt their own species through overpopulation. Again, conservation is not a bad thing by any means, but it should be used wisely as well.
 
Conservation isn't a topic that lends itself to an internet forum like B&B (much less even a grave topic like exhaustible resources). But you owe it to yourself (and significant others) to think about it.
 
Interesting post. It's too bad that conservation and sustainability are such politically charged words in the US.

honestly, regardless of political affiliation, nobody wants to destroy kid's futures.
 

ouch

Stjynnkii membörd dummpsjterd
Moderator Emeritus
This thread wasn't meant to be a discussion about conservation, rather an anniversary of the passing of an entire species.

But you never know.

$indonesia_coelacanth.jpg
 
Yes, I think many people did not have the luxury of caring about nature conservation.
While I might agree, to a certain extent, I don't think nature conservation is a luxury.

If you don't worry about it today, you can rest assured it's only a matter of time until there's nothing left to worry about.

It's not going to be during your lifetime, so I guess you can just relax and think about important stuff.
 
Yeah, didn't we hit "peak oil" sometime in the late 1970's? :001_rolle
Yeah, pretty much.

In the 70's, we never would have thought of relying "unconventional" oil sources like oil shale and sands, much less controversial methods like "fracking."

Natural resources are not (and never have been) inexhaustible.
 
Conservation isn't a topic that lends itself to an internet forum like B&B (much less even a grave topic like exhaustible resources). But you owe it to yourself (and significant others) to think about it.
Question: Can Wet-Shaving be seen as a more environmentally friendly, conservation focused practice?

My spouse and I were talking about this the other day. I'm new to wet-shaving and have been sharing what I learn. As I talked about it with her, we realized that there's less waste and much more natural approach. Blades are steel and can be recycled. Instead of cans of gel or cream using lots of chemicals, most of us go with much more natural soaps/creams. The amount of waste is greatly redued with saftey razors, and virtually eliminated with straight razors. Instead of new cans of shaving cream, we can get a puck refill where the entire packaging is recyclable.

Bottom line is that we saw this new habit of mine as a healthier, more natural, and more environmentally friendly approach to shaving.
 
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No matter how inexhaustible resources may seem, they are not — and this extinct bird is proof of that.

On September 1, 1914, the last passenger pigeon died. They once numbered about five billion, and flocks could blot out the sun for hours.

View attachment 491269
Now, if only we could get rid his modern day cousins!


(I'll leave it with levity as I agree resources are not inexhaustible. However my opinions on the topic are).
 
Although not too many would consider it a "resource" in the usual meaning of the word, the story of the Rocky Mountain locust and its ultimate extinction is the subject of a fascinating book by Jeffrey Lockwood ("Locust: The Devastating Rise and Mysterious Disappearance of the Insect that Shaped the American Frontier").

At one time rivaling the great buffalo herds in biomass and consumption of forage, and whose swarms at their height covered several large states in area, the insect suddenly disappeared. Lockwood solved the mystery of its disappearance and tells how in this book. I never thought entomology would be interesting (creepy, maybe, but interesting?) until I read this book.
 
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