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New To Fountain Pens

I bought this like 6 months ago. I really like it. It's so much better than the ball point pens I usually use. It was on sale on Amazon for $10. Its metal and I so love that!! I got it ink. Both in purple cause I love purple. It can use ink cartridges, but also has a converter I have no idea how to use to use other inks.
It makes me want to write.
I am finally using my nice leather notebook.

The brand is called Asvine. I didn't see anything here in search. Any info on the brand?

How does it compare to others? I don't really think I would upgrade as I love my purple pen.

But interested in maybe trying Ink converter thing to try in not in carts.
 

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This is the little converter thing. I have no idea how to use it. Any tips?
 

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Goulet Pen has a bunch of helpful information and videos. One thing to know from the beginning is fountain pens won't write on coated paper and everything nowadays is coated. It get's really frustrating shaking your pen trying to get it to write and not knowing that it isn't something wrong with the pen. I have a decent metal ballpoint that I have to carry grudgingly because I hate disposable pens. They are available to match a fountain from the same manufacturer if you get something like a Lamy Safari eventually.
 
I just posted about my first experience with a converter.....it may be my last, at least with the small twist ones.

Thread 'I just inked my first FP with a twist converter.' I just inked my first FP with a twist converter. - https://www.badgerandblade.com/forum/threads/i-just-inked-my-first-fp-with-a-twist-converter.618656/

If I had to guess, it is not a high end nib. The higher quality pens, usually have smoother nibs and ones that will flow better, not to mention better material for the body, mechanisms, clips, etc.

I have a Pilot Vanishing Point with a Medium Rhodium plated gold nib and it's nigh and day vs writing my my $15 Pilot Kakuno.

You can get a higher end Fountain Pen in purple too!
 
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Welcome to this wonderful world. Converters are cool. You can break free from the fixed available cartridge colours. Look at Diamine inks, for instance or Japanese ones. Everyone has a favourite brand discovered after years of research. Happy new year
 
Anderson Pens has a neat ink tool where you can explore and compare different ink shades. It's a rabbit hole, but so much fun! I would suggest that you NOT buy full bottles at first, but rather explore buying samples to see first hand how they look in your notebook as well as how well they flow in your pen.
 
This is the little converter thing. I have no idea how to use it. Any tips?
You use the converter just like a cartridge. Remove the cartridge, insert the converter, screw the piston down, then insert the nib assembly into ink of choice and turn the piston in the opposite direction so it draws up the ink. If you like purple, you monger enjoy Fountain Pen Revolution’s Mardi Gras, which lays down purple but has a subtle green sheen to it. Enjoy!
 
This is the little converter thing. I have no idea how to use it. Any tips?
You might also enjoy the Platinum Prefounte, an affordable smooth writing pen. Their converters and cartridges are proprietary, but well made. I love their blue-black ink! You can always wash out and refill a cartridge using a blunt craft syringe to fill with your favorite ink. I have heard that shimmering inks can sometimes clog the feed so they need flushing after use.
 
Fountain pens like to be used. They give problems if they are unused and begin to dry out. I frequently let a drop of water fall on the slit between the tines, and then let it soak in. If ink dries under the ends of the tines the pen becomes quirky. Rub it clean there with a facial tissue. If problems develop with the pen, 95% of all problems (poor ink feeding, blobs of ink on the paper) are related to the clearance space between the metal nib and the plastic feeder under the nib. You can heat it for a few seconds in boiling water and lightly but firmly press the feeder against the nib until it cools in a few seconds. If you will not be using a pen for a few weeks, flush all ink out of it before storing it. With some use pens wear in to the pattern of your grip and movements, and the nib becomes smoother for even more enjoyment. Cartridges usually hold more ink than a converter. I have used syringes and eye droppers fitted with thin brass tubes for easy refilling of a cartridge.

The first fountain pens used a glass vial for the ink. It fit onto a cone to seal. Then rubber bladders with levers allowed refilling the pen. There were also pistons in some pens. Now we are back to a plastic cartridge instead of a glass vial as a cartridge. We have come full circle.

If people know you like fountain pens, you may find them wanting to give you a pen someone in the family once used. If the pen is worthy of any needed repairs, there are firms who will do it for you.
 
Congrats and best wishes for much enjoyment going forward. I love writing with fountain pens and have quite a collection of them, my first being a Christmas gift when I was in HS some 70+ years ago. I suggest you go online to Goulet Pens and you will find many videos, well done, by the founder who has built up a very respected business one everything about using, inking, and stimulating your interest even more. ENJOY! hjs
 
I bought this like 6 months ago. I really like it. It's so much better than the ball point pens I usually use. It was on sale on Amazon for $10. Its metal and I so love that!! I got it ink. Both in purple cause I love purple. It can use ink cartridges, but also has a converter I have no idea how to use to use other inks.
It makes me want to write.
I am finally using my nice leather notebook.

The brand is called Asvine. I didn't see anything here in search. Any info on the brand?

How does it compare to others? I don't really think I would upgrade as I love my purple pen.

But interested in maybe trying Ink converter thing to try in not in carts.
Asvine is not a brand, it's a supplier. The photo shows the pen to be a Hong Dian. Have a look at middle of the pen.
 
Always good to see a new fountain pen user. I have been using fountain pens for about 40 years so I do have a bit of experience. People generally start their fountain pen experiences with ink cartridge/converter pens and that is fine to start with. Personally, I find them to be a PITA. The ink capacity is low and as stated they easily dry out. Though somewhat rare, they are also more prone to leakage.

Once you decide you would like to continue using fountain pens, you will want to get a quality pen and I would suggest you look at piston-fillers. Pelikan, IMHO, makes one of the best and I have several. Depending on your budget, I would recommend the M600, which I like significantly better than my Mont Blanc pens. My M600 is my daily carry and has been for some time, for I have found nothing better for EDC. Pelikan does; however, offer several lines that are less expensive. There are several brands that offer quality piston-fillers as well.

The ink capacity of my M600 is large and I have never had a problem with it drying out - ink flow as always been there, at the ready, even after letting it sit for 4 months.

These pens are fairly expensive, but there are companies that have piston-fillers for very reasonable prices, such as TWISBI. Their Diamond 580 is a very decent pen that can be had for just over $50.00.

I have many other fountain pens as well and another favorite is the Auroa 800C, a fantastic pen to be sure, but it is so nice, I carry/use it only on special occasions. Here is my review of my 800C:

Aurora 88 (800C) Review

There's an additional part to fountain pen collecting as well and that is vintage fountain pens. The vintage Pelikan 400 series from the 50s is of keen interest to me, but there are many brands to choose from: Geha, Schaffer, Parker, etc. But just as with anything vintage, buy the best one that you can afford.

You should also be aware that fountain pens with typically bleed through regular paper. Invest in a few quality writing pads that have paper designed to be used with fountain pens, such as Rhodia (my preference) or any of the other fountain pen friendly papers.

Keep in mind that Japanese nibs run a size behind European nibs, at the minimum. My experience is that Japanese nibs are at least 1.5 - 2 sizes finer than German nibs. If you're interested in a Japanese pen, I'd recommend the Pilot Heritage 92 - one of the few Japanese piston-fillers.

Ink is also an interesting subject. My advice here is to buy quality, avoid the cheap stuff and read reviews online.

I wish you good luck on your new endeavor, which can certainly be a rewarding one.If you do a lot of writing, there's nothing better than a fountain pen.

Additionally, fountainpennetwork.com is an excellent resource.
 
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Always good to see a new fountain pen user. I have been using fountain pens for about 40 years so I do have a bit of experience. People generally start their fountain pen experiences with ink cartridge/converter pens and that is fine to start with. Personally, I find them to be a PITA. The ink capacity is low and as stated they easily dry out. Though somewhat rare, they are also more prone to leakage.

Once you decide you would like to continue using fountain pens, you will want to get a quality pen and I would suggest you look at piston-fillers. Pelikan, IMHO, makes one of the best and I have several. Depending on your budget, I would recommend the M600, which I like significantly better than my Mont Blanc pens. My M600 is my daily carry and has been for some time, for I have found nothing better for EDC. Pelikan does; however, offer several lines that are less expensive. There are several brands that offer quality piston-fillers as well.

The ink capacity of my M600 is large and I have never had a problem with it drying out - ink flow as always been there, at the ready, even after letting it sit for 4 months.

These pens are fairly expensive, but there are companies that have piston-fillers for very reasonable prices, such as TWISBI. Their Diamond 580 is a very decent pen that can be had for just over $50.00.

I have many other fountain pens as well and another favorite is the Auroa 800C, a fantastic pen to be sure, but it is so nice, I carry/use it only on special occasions. Here is my review of my 800C:

Aurora 88 (800C) Review

There's an additional part to fountain pen collecting as well and that is vintage fountain pens. The vintage Pelikan 400 series from the 50s is of keen interest to me, but there are many brands to choose from: Geha, Schaffer, Parker, etc. But just as with anything vintage, buy the best one that you can afford.

You should also be aware that fountain pens with typically bleed through regular paper. Invest in a few quality writing pads that have paper designed to be used with fountain pens, such as Rhodia (my preference) or any of the other fountain pen friendly papers.

Keep in mind that Japanese nibs run a size behind European nibs, at the minimum. My experience is that Japanese nibs are at least 1.5 - 2 sizes finer than German nibs. If you're interested in a Japanese pen, I'd recommend the Pilot Heritage 92 - one of the few Japanese piston-fillers.

Ink is also an interesting subject. My advice here is to buy quality, avoid the cheap stuff and read reviews online.

I wish you good luck on your new endeavor, which can certainly be a rewarding one.If you do a lot of writing, there's nothing better than a fountain pen.

Additionally, fountainpennetwork.com is an excellent resource.
I'm sorry, but I have to disagree with you. When someone buys a first fountain pen, it's simply that it's nice to write with and it looks nice. The Platinum Preppy can be filled and left in a drawer for a year and still write immediately. It's designed to do that; the cartridge and cap are better sealed. That is all a beginner wants at first. The Preppy costs about $6. For $12 there is the more attractive Platinum Plaisir. The pen is the same but the barrel and cap are metal and is available in some nice colours.
I understand that you are trying to be helpful, but instead you are showing that you are knowledgeable. Too much information.
Pistons can go wrong. They are a pain to clean ready for a different colour ink. The more moving parts, the more to go wrong.
 

tankerjohn

A little poofier than I prefer
I'm sorry, but I have to disagree with you. When someone buys a first fountain pen, it's simply that it's nice to write with and it looks nice. The Platinum Preppy can be filled and left in a drawer for a year and still write immediately. It's designed to do that; the cartridge and cap are better sealed. That is all a beginner wants at first. The Preppy costs about $6. For $12 there is the more attractive Platinum Plaisir. The pen is the same but the barrel and cap are metal and is available in some nice colours.
I understand that you are trying to be helpful, but instead you are showing that you are knowledgeable. Too much information.
Pistons can go wrong. They are a pain to clean ready for a different colour ink. The more moving parts, the more to go wrong.
Yeah, I wouldn't recommend Pelikan M600s or Aurora 88s to new fountain pen users either. A Preppy? It depends. Obviously its a cheap - and good! - entry point, but I do think there's an element of esthetics that some people are looking for when they switch over from ballpoints and the Preppy definitely doesn't have that. Plaisir is closer. Pilot Metro, sure. Lamy Safari. Etc, etc. I think we have several other threads that gets into all of this in great detail.
 
Yeah, I wouldn't recommend Pelikan M600s or Aurora 88s to new fountain pen users either. A Preppy? It depends. Obviously its a cheap - and good! - entry point, but I do think there's an element of esthetics that some people are looking for when they switch over from ballpoints and the Preppy definitely doesn't have that. Plaisir is closer. Pilot Metro, sure. Lamy Safari. Etc, etc. I think we have several other threads that gets into all of this in great detail.
I don't disagree with you, but why is everyone trying to get her to buy another pen? She's bought it and loves it. The Hong Dian will eventually dry out if not used, but not quickly since it is thick metal and remains cold; this means the water in the ink is slow to evaporate.
She needs to learn how to use a convertor and simply enjoy her pen.
 
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