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New residents don't like it

It is funny how you grow up eating something, find it very tasty and normal, yet folks new to the area turn their noses up to it. What regional dishes did you grow up with that transplants turn their noses up too, and you don't understand why?

For me it is Blue Corn Mush. Basically Navajo Grits. I'm not Navajo but grew up on the reservation and, with a little honey and a dash of salt, this stuff rocks. People who move here can't stand it. Even southerners who grew up with and really like grits. I suppose it is the Juniper ash.

Now that I made the comparison I wonder what Blue Corn Mush and Shrimp would taste like?

This young lady does a pretty good explanation of the process.
 
Does it have a unique flavor? Or is it just the color that turns people off?

Because corn mash with honey and salt sounds lovely.
 
Does it have a unique flavor? Or is it just the color that turns people off?

Because corn mash with honey and salt sounds lovely.
Doesn’t taste completely like grits if that’s what you mean. People seem to hate all parts of it. I don’t understand it.
 
I’ve never heard of it- but it doesn’t seem any more unusual than root beer, or ginger ale. Or for that matter, prune soda (Dr. Pepper).

A spruce soda sounds quite refreshing, actually.
 
When I was little we would travel all over in a VW micro bus. I would try a new and different soda when Mom and dad would let me. Never saw anything like that. Where is it from?
I have seen it throughout eastern Canada in the past, but am now in Quebec.

If you do a Google image search with the words "spruce beer" you will see that several companies make it.

It is very refreshing during the summer months. It's one of the few pops that is "cloudy" and not clear.
 

BigFoot

Moderator
I am not sure this is regional but growing up on a farm in Iowa we had creamed Turnips 3 or 4 times a week. To tell someone that now they think it is absolutely disgusting.
 
I’ve never heard of it- but it doesn’t seem any more unusual than root beer, or ginger ale. Or for that matter, prune soda (Dr. Pepper).

A spruce soda sounds quite refreshing, actually.
I have seen it throughout eastern Canada in the past, but am now in Quebec.

If you do a Google image search with the words "spruce beer" you will see that several companies make it.

It is very refreshing during the summer months. It's one of the few pops that is "cloudy" and not clear.
From what i've read spruce beer is fermented rather then carbonated so that would probably account for the cloudiness.

dave
 

TexLaw

Contributor
The biggest ones around here are real Cajun and Soul food that didn't go mass market. Real boudin, dirty rice, head cheese, chitlins, smothered neck bones, chicken livers and gizzards, okra that wasn't fried (especially okra and tomatoes), and a bunch of other stuff like that were all but staples when I was growing up. Nearly all that is pretty tough to find, these days, unless I look for a specialty store or restaurant. Just about anyone who's moved down here from somewhere other than the very Deep South give it a strong "yuck."
 

TexLaw

Contributor
Just to expand on that a little, fried okra always was around, but that's one of the things that went mass market.

Also, real boudin and dirty rice are not rice, hamburger, and some "Cajun" spice.
 
Everyone came here from somewhere else bringing their food culture with them so i'm not aware of anything food wise that would be unique to this particular world corner.
dave
 

DoctorShavegood

Ambassador
Only real Texans can eat tripa or tripe (in English). Foreigners from other states turn their nose up on a real delicacy. The best way to eat them is boil them down to make them soft, then fry in lard to make them crispy. Serve inside a tortilla with hot sauce.

 
Only real Texans can eat tripa or tripe (in English). Foreigners from other states turn their nose up on a real delicacy. The best way to eat them is boil them down to make them soft, then fry in lard to make them crispy. Serve inside a tortilla with hot sauce.

This is basically on every taco stand down in Mexico, but is a real delicacy, just made my mouth watery!
 
Only real Texans can eat tripa or tripe (in English). Foreigners from other states turn their nose up on a real delicacy. The best way to eat them is boil them down to make them soft, then fry in lard to make them crispy. Serve inside a tortilla with hot sauce.

I've eaten tripe in Vietnamese and Chinese dishes and it's all good to me, will keep my eyes open for this, sounds like a winner!
dave
 
It's basically in every taco truck in southern California as well. As far as I know it's not there to be served to real Texans, or unreal ones for that matter :)

This is basically on every taco stand down in Mexico, but is a real delicacy, just made my mouth watery!
 
We recently moved to NC. There's a popular dish here called liver mush. I love all sorts of liver but that liver mush just didn't do it for me.
 
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