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New humidor and a few questions.

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
I love my best friend! She is a great listener and got me a humidor for Christmas!




My last humidor I ruined. I tried to season it with a wet washrag and ended up warping the wood. This was years ago and haven't had one since then.

So I already made a list to get this one started off right:
$Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 11.29.39 AM.png

Here is where my questions begin.

1. The proper use for the Boveda packets reads
To select the proper number of packets for your humidor, you use 1 packet for every 50 cigars + 1 packet.
so does this mean I need 2 packets in this humidor? And if so I'm assuming it won't double the humidity level??

2. This humidor has a minor defect. A staple is sticking out of the lid on the inside where it closes. (see picture). Sending it back is not an option as I tossed the box, it was a gift, and I just don't want to go through all the trouble of sending it to my friend (she's in IL, I'm in TN) so she can go through the process of sending it back. (she ordered it online).
Do you think this minor staple will affect the climate inside? (humidity and temp). or should I try to clip it off?




3. I have it displayed in my hutch for now and I'd like to keep it there once it is loaded with cigars. The hutch is lighted and the light does put off a little bit of heat. I do not plan on keeping the light on though because it puts a wicked glare on my TV. So 99% of the time the light will be off, and the doors will be closed.
Do you think this will be an OK spot to keep the humidor as far as keeping the right environment in the humidor goes? below is a pic for reference.




Thank you for listening and answering my questions!
 
1. This is kind of creepy because I have that Humidor and I have a hutch almost exactly like that (But I don't have the humidor in the hutch)
2. If it were I, I would try to clip that staple off as much as possible. It appears to be interfering with the closing of the lid as evidenced by the staple mark in the wood where it sits against the bottom when closed.
3. Once you clip it off, I'd try to raise that dent in the wood by the judicious use of moisture on a toothpick. I feel confident that you have some of those handy. Then again, the crease doesn't go all the way across, so you might just be fine once the staple is gone.
4. Heat is the enemy of cigars, but my light doesn't raise the temperature in the hutch significantly as long as you are not within a foot or so of the lamp. What you lose in a one degree temperature rise you probably gain by having the humidor inside another container and not just out in the room.
5. The added advantage of having it in the hutch is that you are less likely to have visitors opening your humidor to take a peek inside, even though there's a humongous window on top.
6. 1 pack for every 50 cigars, plus 1 pack means one pack for any amount of cigars up to 50 plus 1 pack, so yes, if you have 20 cigars - the directions would be interpreted as meaning two packs.
7. These are all just my personal opinions.

The Humidor (below the President)


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And the hutch


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Boveda are 2-way humidification systems. Which means, if you have 15 packs that are 69% RH, your humidor will still be at 69% RH, regardless of if you have 10 or 100 sticks in it.

As luvmysuper says, 2 packs is just right for a humidor that size for 50 sticks. Also, if its winter by you, the air is also dry, and your humidor needs a little extra help to maintain humidity.

You can season your humidor by microwaving a wet sock for 2 minutes and setting it on a small dish in your humidor then closing it and letting it sit for half an hour. Do that twice, and the steam will fully season your humidor.
 
A gentle way of speeding up the seasoning process is to use a sponge and distilled water (always use only distilled water in the humi). Wet the sponge and then wring out the excess moisture - the sponge should be only barely damp - and proceed to wipe down every part of the humi interior. Make sure to get into the corners and really take the time required to do it well. As long as the sponge isn't dripping, this works well. You may need to repeat the process once or twice after 24 hour periods.

Then, also picking up a digital thermometer (unless your hygro has one) is also a good idea. That way you can keep an eye on temperature too - I think tobacco beetles become a concern above around 20*C (65 or 70F).
 
Of course, the above will work as my esteemed colleagues have stated. The best way to season a humidor is to use your humipaks and let them sit in the humidor. Yes, it will take longer for the humidity level in your humidor to come up to 69% and keep it steady. But, it is the most reliable way to do it. The humidity will come up faster if it is full.

So...you need to get 50 cigars and fill your humidor right now! You are just taking care of the wonderful gift that she has given you in the proper and most reliable way. I'm sure she will understand! :thumbup:
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
Thanks folks for the replies! I never heard of the sock trick before. Be sure to use a clean sock! "hmm why do my cigars taste funny?" :laugh:
I tried the sponge trick with my last humidor. My guess is the sponge was way to wet. I don't want to risk that again. I think the seasoning packet is my best bet. I'm not in any rush.

Give it to Bigfoot!
If I ever see a Bigfoot around here I will!

3. Once you clip it off, I'd try to raise that dent in the wood by the judicious use of moisture on a toothpick. I feel confident that you have some of those handy.
I don't know what you're talking about...


Thanks for all the info there. I think I will try to clip the staple. I just had the thought of rust once the humidity rises.
 
Rather than clipping, I personally would try to cut it at each visible extent with a Dremel diamond cutoff wheel, gently and patiently at low speed.

I'd then fail at patience and turn up the speed, most likely.
 
Agreed with all the above. I have used the damp sponge on a couple of humis with no issues....just do not soak the cedar.

The temp that you want to stay at is 65ºF-70ºF (18ºC-21ºC).....any amount of time at or above 72ºF (22ºC) is getting very risky for causing beetle hatching.
 
I've been letting my humidor sit for a few days with a saucer of distilled water in it and letting it humidify at its leisure. Seems good to go now.

I'm throwing my cigars in tonight and seeing how it goes.
 
I've been letting my humidor sit for a few days with a saucer of distilled water in it and letting it humidify at its leisure. Seems good to go now.

I'm throwing my cigars in tonight and seeing how it goes.

Very little, if any, humidity will passively leave the saucer. This method is the safest, but it also seems to be completely ineffective. I've tried it too, but didn't get anywhere either.
 
I've been letting my humidor sit for a few days with a saucer of distilled water in it and letting it humidify at its leisure. Seems good to go now.

I'm throwing my cigars in tonight and seeing how it goes.

I've used this method before, but with a shotglass instead of a saucer. It took quite a while, but it did work.
Bear in mind that your cigars will absorb some humidity, so you may see your hygro drop when you add the sticks.
 

Toothpick

Needs milk and a bidet!
Once again you all hit the nail on the head with responses!

If the cigars will absorb some humidity would it be safer to add a few at a time rather than go hog wild and stuff the humidor right out the gate?
 
Once again you all hit the nail on the head with responses!

If the cigars will absorb some humidity would it be safer to add a few at a time rather than go hog wild and stuff the humidor right out the gate?

I found no advantage to the piece meal method. It'll take just as long with an initial input of 40 as it will adding them 5 at a time. Maybe longer if they dry out more while you're waiting to put them in. Something to consider in the very dry winter months.
Eventually, when everything is settled in, you'll be replacing them a few at a time, so it will kind of self regulate.

By the way - a 50 cigar humidor is really packed at 50 and air circulation probably is hampered with them all packed in like that.
I could be wrong, but it just seems to my eye that having some space can't hurt.
I never buy or keep more than about 25 to 30 in my 50 cigar humidor.
 
Once again you all hit the nail on the head with responses!

If the cigars will absorb some humidity would it be safer to add a few at a time rather than go hog wild and stuff the humidor right out the gate?

I agree with luvmysuper. You would be ok to add them all in at once, just keep an eye on it to make sure everything levels back out after about 2 days.
With regard to air circulation, it certainly does make a difference. I started noticing that the sticks in the bottom corners were a little drier than everything else. I use cheap bamboo chopsticks as spacers between my sticks. Not sure if it actually helps or if it just makes me feel better, but it doesn't hurt.
 
I hate reading a persons question and knowing the perfect answer, then reading through the comment and finding the right answers as I scroll through. Oh well, there's plenty of proper ways to season a humidor and most of the ones above will work perfectly. As long as you're not directly soaking the wood it's pretty much right. There's my two cents.
 
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