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New entry from George Dickel

As we used to say, "Get Pickled With Dickel!"

Wonder when that'll get over the border so I can find it in Canada? This dang pandemic folderol has put a crimp in my annual booze-and-seafood binge on the Oregon Coast.

O.H.
 
Although bourbon can be produced in an state in the USA, nearly all bourbon comes from Kentucky. Whiskeys from Tennessee (Jack Daniels and George Dickel) were usaually called Tennessee Whiskey or Whisky rather than bourbon.

To be called bourbon, the mash has to contain a minimum of 51% corn in the mashbill, which imparts a sweet taste. Many distilleries use a much higher percentage of corn. The rest of the grain might be barley, rye, wheat, etc.

To be called straight bourbon whiskey, the distilled spirit has to be aged for a minimum of two years in new charred, white oak barrels with no added color or flavorings. When the aged spirit is bottled, the used barrels are ship all over the world where they are used to age other spirits or things like tobacco, maple syrup, etc. If produced in Kentucky, it will often be labeled Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey.

Although Tennessee whiskey typically meets the requirements to be called bourbon, Tennessee whiskey is usually filtered through or soaked in a bed of charcoal. Jack Daniels uses charcoal produced from sugar maple.

Unlike most distillers in the USA, George Dickel uses the whisky variant of the name as noted in the photo above.

Another interesting fact is that although Tennessee whiskey (or whisky) has to be produced in Tennessee, not all whiskey made in Tennessee is Tennessee whiskey as it does not meat the requirement for corn content, aging, etc. There are distilleries that make moonshine in the tradition of many proud mountaineers/hillbillys. It is sold as corn whiskey as it is not aged.
 
Although bourbon can be produced in an state in the USA, nearly all bourbon comes from Kentucky. Whiskeys from Tennessee (Jack Daniels and George Dickel) were usaually called Tennessee Whiskey or Whisky rather than bourbon.

To be called bourbon, the mash has to contain a minimum of 51% corn in the mashbill, which imparts a sweet taste. Many distilleries use a much higher percentage of corn. The rest of the grain might be barley, rye, wheat, etc.

To be called straight bourbon whiskey, the distilled spirit has to be aged for a minimum of two years in new charred, white oak barrels with no added color or flavorings. When the aged spirit is bottled, the used barrels are ship all over the world where they are used to age other spirits or things like tobacco, maple syrup, etc. If produced in Kentucky, it will often be labeled Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey.

Although Tennessee whiskey typically meets the requirements to be called bourbon, Tennessee whiskey is usually filtered through or soaked in a bed of charcoal. Jack Daniels uses charcoal produced from sugar maple.

Unlike most distillers in the USA, George Dickel uses the whisky variant of the name as noted in the photo above.

Another interesting fact is that although Tennessee whiskey (or whisky) has to be produced in Tennessee, not all whiskey made in Tennessee is Tennessee whiskey as it does not meat the requirement for corn content, aging, etc. There are distilleries that make moonshine in the tradition of many proud mountaineers/hillbillys. It is sold as corn whiskey as it is not aged.
Excellent information. One other note: Not ALL Tennessee Whiskey uses the Lincoln County process. Prichards is allowed to be labelled a Tennessee Whiskey even though they do not follow this process. They were essentially "grandfathered in".
 
Excellent information. One other note: Not ALL Tennessee Whiskey uses the Lincoln County process. Prichards is allowed to be labelled a Tennessee Whiskey even though they do not follow this process. They were essentially "grandfathered in".
That is why I said that Tennessee Whiskey usually is filtered through or soaked in a bed of charcoal. Prichards is the exception to the rule.
 
Although bourbon can be produced in an state in the USA, nearly all bourbon comes from Kentucky. Whiskeys from Tennessee (Jack Daniels and George Dickel) were usaually called Tennessee Whiskey or Whisky rather than bourbon.

To be called bourbon, the mash has to contain a minimum of 51% corn in the mashbill, which imparts a sweet taste. Many distilleries use a much higher percentage of corn. The rest of the grain might be barley, rye, wheat, etc.

To be called straight bourbon whiskey, the distilled spirit has to be aged for a minimum of two years in new charred, white oak barrels with no added color or flavorings. When the aged spirit is bottled, the used barrels are ship all over the world where they are used to age other spirits or things like tobacco, maple syrup, etc. If produced in Kentucky, it will often be labeled Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey.

Although Tennessee whiskey typically meets the requirements to be called bourbon, Tennessee whiskey is usually filtered through or soaked in a bed of charcoal. Jack Daniels uses charcoal produced from sugar maple.

Unlike most distillers in the USA, George Dickel uses the whisky variant of the name as noted in the photo above.

Another interesting fact is that although Tennessee whiskey (or whisky) has to be produced in Tennessee, not all whiskey made in Tennessee is Tennessee whiskey as it does not meat the requirement for corn content, aging, etc. There are distilleries that make moonshine in the tradition of many proud mountaineers/hillbillys. It is sold as corn whiskey as it is not aged.
Ray:
...and great information! :thumbsup:

BTW, on their website the ‘specifics’ of the recipe is;

"Proof: 90 (45% ABV)
Mashbill: 84% corn, 8% rye and 8% malted barley
Char: [new white oak barrels]"

Works Cited: George Dickel Bourbon - https://www.georgedickel.com/whisky/dickel-bourbon

"Keep your friends close and your liquor even closer" Old Spirits Proverb
 
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