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Need help identifying a rare Kent shave brush

It's marked "H275" "Made in England" and has a Kent logo I've never seen before, a shield. It's marked "sterilized" so it's post 1921. It's about 3 inches tall and measuring 1.25 inches in diameter at the base, making it the Kent equivalent of Simpson's Wee Scott. I was wondering if anyone knows when this was made?




Edit: I've now seen several with that sticker, though none in as nice a condition. Someone said that sticker predates his Kent brushes, which are over 20 years old. I've emailed Kent, and hopefully they can shed some more light on this brush model.
 
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I was watching that one, but figured it would go for more than what I wanted to pay, and it did. Congrats on a really sweet looking Kent.
 
Can't help but that's one cool looking brush. :thumbup:
Thanks. :)

I was watching that one, but figured it would go for more than what I wanted to pay, and it did. Congrats on a really sweet looking Kent.
It went for more than I wanted to pay too, but it didn't go for more than I was willing to pay. I'll post up comparison shots when I get it next to a modern Wee Scot and a vintage Wee Scot "Nano."
 
I can't help either but I'll offer my congratulations. Regarding an email to Kent: I have been somewhat less than successful getting answers to questions much simpler than yours. Good luck with yours though.

If you haven't already done so, post your nice photos in the Order of the Kent thread found in Clubs and Brotherhoods.
 
I can't help either but I'll offer my congratulations. Regarding an email to Kent: I have been somewhat less than successful getting answers to questions much simpler than yours. Good luck with yours though.

If you haven't already done so, post your nice photos in the Order of the Kent thread found in Clubs and Brotherhoods.
I already posted the pics in the TOK thread.

Regarding an email to Kent, I received a reply asking for a picture of the brush. We'll see what happens from there.
 
That's something very unique you have, congratulations on that buy! The handle condition is absolutely amazing. I almost had the reaction 'where's the rest of the brush??'

I've contacted Kent for dating help in the past, their archives aren't entirely complete. I remember a member here stating it lost in a fire or something.
 
I contacted the seller to see if he/she had more information about it, but unfortunately, they picked it up in a single home estate auction.

It looks as though it ought to have had a travel tube at one time. The label is the most pristine one I've ever seen.
 
I received the following from Kent:

"Hi

All I have been able to find is that it was made in the 30-40’s.

It is filled with badger and has a composition handle which would have been white. The cost was around 60 shilling

Vanessa Peters
Export/Import Services Manager"

From this I gather that the Kent shield logo was in use during the 30's and 40's, so that ought to help others date their brushes as well.

Originally white, that was expected. I suppose I could always peel the sticker off to confirm that (not going to happen). :p

As Kent doesn't use a "grading" system for their hair, a response of the brush being filled with "badger" was to be expected as well.

60 Schillings. Well, that is from before Britian's switch to the decimal Pound Sterling, so I'll say it probably sold for under $5 USD, or about 3£. Rather expensive compared to the Wee Scot, which sold for 17 shillings and six-pence during that time period.

A lot of good information there, and not many modern companies would have bothered to respond to my enquiry. Kudos to Kent for their excellent customer service.
 
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Love it, that's great detail, glad Vanessa was able to supply such detail. It really gives a sense of completeness to your owning the brush to know such information, I feel at least :) thanks for the update
 
After using it a few times the tips split. So it was actually a boar brush, and NOS at that. It's a nice little brush.
 
It's most likely a mixed knot, which many old Kent brushes utilized for their lower tiered offerings. Their pure badger brushes were priced relatively higher and out of reach for most working class men.
 
It's not mixed. The outer ring of hairs is sketched to look like badger, the inner hairs are a mix of black and blond boar, both of which are displaying split tips. Kent has never made a cased brush, so the outer hairs must also be boar.
 
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