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Need a new brush. How about one with a cork handle.

Mantic59 has a review of this new brush from Pacific shaving Limited edition. The handle is cork it floats. They say cork is very water proof and anti- microbial. I like the handle. This is a synthetic brush. They wanted to make a brush that was sustainable. Asking $39.99 I'm mulling over if I want this one.
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Interesting! I would imagine the in-hand feel would be nice, and have a bit of a cushiony feel, I do wonder if the cork will hold up over time though. My experience with cork (in cork stoppers and cork boards) is that its similar to styrofoam, when together and used without breaking the form, it works, but once a little bit comes off, it tends to break apart easily the edge of a corkboard, if you pick at it, crumbles off easily, and a cork stopped when pierced with a spiral pull, also crumbles easily. But maybe they treated it to avoid this? A neat idea though
 
Mantic59 has a review of this new brush from Pacific shaving Limited edition. The handle is cork it floats. They say cork is very water proof and anti- microbial. I like the handle. This is a synthetic brush. They wanted to make a brush that was sustainable. Asking $39.99 I'm mulling over if I want this one.
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It's a novelty, but wood is also sustainable. Cork is made from the bark of a tree. Wine corks are punched out from strips of the bark. What is left over is shredded and pressed together with a binder and used for other things. That is what this handle seems to be made of. Basically strips of cork glued together.

It's true cork trees are not killed when harvesting their bark. However, regular wood is sustainable since new trees can grow to take the place of those harvested.
 
I can still see Brett as he charges from the dugout to home plate. Like an angry powder blue bull.

On July 24, 1983, with two outs in the ninth and U.L. Washington on first base, Kansas City All-Star third baseman George Brett homered off New York closer Goose Gossage, giving the Royals a 5-4 lead. But while Brett celebrated in the Yankee Stadium dugout following his round-tripper, Yankees manager Billy Martin walked to home plate and informed umpire Tim McClelland that Brett's bat was covered with more pine tar than the rules allowed. Pine tar, a sticky glue-like substance used to give batters a better grip, hardens over time – making the bat more effective.

McClelland carefully measured the bat against the 17-inch width of home plate, determined that the bat violated the 18-inch pine tar rule, turned to the Royals dugout and signaled that Brett was out, ending the game.

An enraged Brett instantly charged McClelland, screaming wildly while being restrained by teammates and Royals manager Dick Howser. But the call stood, the game over.
 
I will assume that with regular use, the appearance of the brush handle will suffer, where it will get dirty from soap. The surface is not smooth, it will not be easy to wash off the soap deposits.
 
Wow how interesting
At first I thought that this was the George Brett limited edition ...😂😁🤪
We need a shaving soap to round out the cheating in baseball theme. We could add a spitball shaving soap. It would be the slickest soap around. Any artisan willing to step up and create one?

We could do football cheating too, but no one wants a deflate gate deflating lather from their shave soap.
 
I find that cork is pretty durable if prepared correctly. My oldest and favorite fishing rod grips are cork.
It also depends on whether it is agglomerate cork or natural cork. Natural cork is usually used in quality rods and the appearance is obvious. It is relatively hard and durable. Agglomerate cork is the composite cork used in some cheaper wine bottles. It is similar to the difference between plywood and particleboard. This is what agglomerate cork looks like. It is recycled cork and that has been ground up into pieces.
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Natural cork, on the other hand, is rarer and far more expensive. Here is a photo of a natural cork fishing grip.

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As for the brush, it is made from the cheaper cork material.
 
It also depends on whether it is agglomerate cork or natural cork. Natural cork is usually used in quality rods and the appearance is obvious. It is relatively hard and durable. Agglomerate cork is the composite cork used in some cheaper wine bottles. It is similar to the difference between plywood and particleboard. This is what agglomerate cork looks like. It is recycled cork and that has been ground up into pieces.
View attachment 1264488

Natural cork, on the other hand, is rarer and far more expensive. Here is a photo of a natural cork fishing grip.

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As for the brush, it is made from the cheaper cork material.
Great explanation! Thanks. :clap: :clap:
 
For what it is it is to expensive
But it does give ideas for glueing a fishing rod handle on top of a pvc tubing inner core. It would make for a very bouncy allmost unbreakable travel brush handle. Oh and it is going to be very light. Not a bad idea
But still for what they did it is to expensive.
 
When I lived in FL the heat and humidity wrecked some of the grips on my fishing rods. Rather than replace the rods I replaced the grips and in the process learned about cork. The cheaper grades of cork would absorb whatever was on your hands - including the "scent" of fish. However, the hard cork resisted that. The difference in absolute cost was not that great: a cheap grip cost about $2. However, the better grades or cork were only $3 to $5.
 
I've certainly dropped brushes before due to my hands being too slick. I don't think this brush will have that problem...
 
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