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My son turned 13

Sweet kit. If he's the sentimental type those things could turn into treasured items kept for a lifetime and that would be great for him and great for you. But if he's just not into it that's cool too.

As a father of two boys who are mostly grown up (talking chronological age here, not maturity level....*sigh*...) the only advice I can give is to remember that your passions are your passions and your priorities are your priorities - not there's in either case. Try not to be disappointed - or at least be sure not to show it - if he doesn't appreciate the beautiful antiques and just goes for the can and cartridge. Or (like my boys) wants to go electric.

My boys just don't share my passions for the most part (oldest just got into motorcycles and started becoming a motor racing junky a couple of years ago to my delight and my wife's chagrin, however!). That's been a little hard for me over the years. I don't think I'm pushy with them but I guess my enthusiasm for some things might be taken as such. They've quit skiing, scouts, mountain biking, etc. Wet shaving too obviously. MAKING them do any of these things though is just not a good idea.

I happened to follow my father's passions but my boys just didn't follow mine. My father didn't push me into anything, didn't make me do anything. His father pushed him into things and made him do things and that just made him hate them. Hunting, American Football and Electrical Engineering all being activities they had major fallings-out about. My dad harbored bitterness toward his father for the rest of his life. I did my best to ensure that didn't become me and my boys.
 
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KeenDogg

Social Media Guru
Thank you everyone for the kind sentiments and the advice. I am truly touched.

I saw him checking the stuff out earlier today. He seems more interested in the cartridges but I hope, in time, he will try the fatboy. He also has a flare tip I gave him at 8 years old so he could shave with Dad.

@GV27 That is wonderful advice. I will take it to heart.

@Graydog It was a cheesecake and it was delicious! It had a "candle" that popped open and rained edible confetti down on the cake. My son looked at the brush and said "Whoa! That is sick!" That means he likes it. 😉
 
Reminds me of when my dad let me wet shave for the first time. He got me a Gillette Blue 2 disposable and it certainly was an experience wet shaving for the first time! (I was 13 back then). I have used various razors over the years such as the Sensor, Mach3, Fusion and obviously my current DE razor.

All the best to you and your son.

Jason.
 

FarmerTan

"Just Call Me Billy"
You are the man, 'Dawg!

Much like @GV27 said, my son prefers my late FIL's electric. He was incredibly close to him, as he and MIL watched him whilst I was in nursing skool. Shoot, he drove his Gramps's car into the ground, like 260,000 miles worth!

You sound like you are doing a phenomenal job as a Dad. I miss my Dad EVERY day. Two weeks from tomorrow, if all goes as planned, I'm performing the ceremony for my son's wedding. May YOU be as blessed in future my friend!
 
Congrats to you and your son! Hitting the teen years is a big step and that shave kit is a great way to jump into them with class!
 
Sweet kit. If he's the sentimental type those things could turn into treasured items kept for a lifetime and that would be great for him and great for you. But if he's just not into it that's cool too.

As a father of two boys who are mostly grown up (talking chronological age here, not maturity level....*sigh*...) the only advice I can give is to remember that your passions are your passions and your priorities are your priorities - not there's in either case. Try not to be disappointed - or at least be sure not to show it - if he doesn't appreciate the beautiful antiques and just goes for the can and cartridge. Or (like my boys) wants to go electric.

My boys just don't share my passions for the most part (oldest just got into motorcycles and started becoming a motor racing junky a couple of years ago to my delight and my wife's chagrin, however!). That's been a little hard for me over the years. I don't think I'm pushy with them but I guess my enthusiasm for some things might be taken as such. They've quit skiing, scouts, mountain biking, etc. Wet shaving too obviously. MAKING them do any of these things though is just not a good idea.

I happened to follow my father's passions but my boys just didn't follow mine. My father didn't push me into anything, didn't make me do anything. His father pushed him into things and made him do things and that just made him hate them. Hunting, American Football and Electrical Engineering all being activities they had major fallings-out about. My dad harbored bitterness toward his father for the rest of his life. I did my best to ensure that didn't become me and my boys.
Not having children of my own but considering them in the near future, that’s some excellent advice i’ll take to heart. I know so many people with the same story so this really drove it home. My father literally never taught me a thing about shaving and though i wish he had, i’m wondering if i would’ve even cared at the time. I think the OP did the right thing in giving his son all the tools and letting him decide on which he wants to use. My mom gave me a cool travel shaving kit when i was around 15 and though i didn’t have much interest at the time, i did keep it and all these years later i now use it on all my trips. I recently thanked her for what was a very thoughtful and practical gift i simply didn’t fully appreciate when i was young. We actually reminisced about it not long ago and she was really happy i still had and enjoyed it. So to the OP, no matter what route he goes, i promise he’ll remember the gift!
 
Coincidentally, my eldest son turns 13 in about 3 weeks. He has some peach fuzz on his upper lip, but isn't really ready to be shaving yet. I've set aside an EJ89 to give to him to try out when the time comes, but I will also offer him the option of a cartridge (well maybe not a Fusion, if they are still selling those - that thing was too much). Might as well experience both and let him come to his own conclusions as to what works for him and his beard.
 
A few years ago, probably when my son was around 13, I gave him a 1930s Gillette Tech, a Whipped Dog badger brush and various soaps and creams. I noticed when I took him down to London on Saturday to start his first year at university that some of the first items he unpacked were that razor and brush, plus a Merkur 34C he "borrowed" from me a couple of years ago.
He might not share my tastes in music or clothes, but at least he's firmly committed to getting a good, traditional shave.
 
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