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My latest brushes

I began a new hobby of turning brushes not too long ago. I'm only a few brushes in and have no previous experience doing woodworking or anything of the sort - so I am posting my latest creations in the hopes of getting some honest feedback.

I have been learning a whole lot (aka messing up a lot of brush handles) and feel like I learn more each time I get on the lathe. I am a musician, so it's a new and fulfilling experience to create something with my hands that is not music, but functional visual art if you will. At any rate, here are my latest two brushes.

The redheart I made for my son for his 5th birthday. The maple burl (with TGN 2 band finest 24mm) does not have a home yet.



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Suhrim21

Contributor
They both look very nice. But the maple burl I absolutely love. I have been replacing the acrylic brushes in my collection with wood I just love the texture and grain and natural contrasts wood offers. Looks to me like you have a natural talent for making brushes.
 
Your son is shaving at FIVE :straight:wow .

But seriously those are some nice looking brushes. The redheart looks more modern the maple burl is beautiful and is a very classic looking shape.

What finish are you using?
 
Your son is shaving at FIVE :straight:wow .

But seriously those are some nice looking brushes. The redheart looks more modern the maple burl is beautiful and is a very classic looking shape.

What finish are you using?
What can I say? He's quite the little man.

I have been doing a linseed oil coat to enhance color and grain, and then CA. For this burl I used a coat of teak oil and sanded it to fill in some pretty big gaps, then a coat of CA which I sanded off before the final finishing.

The CA is my biggest area of learning right now. I'm working on getting it consistently even and glassy smooth. I am going to be trying a thin, watery textured CA next.

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They both look very nice. But the maple burl I absolutely love. I have been replacing the acrylic brushes in my collection with wood I just love the texture and grain and natural contrasts wood offers. Looks to me like you have a natural talent for making brushes.
Thank you! I appreciate all of the comments so far.

I agree with you about the wood. I like acrylic as well and have been very pleased with the acrylic brush I have made, but I love the wood. I have found that my best brushes come from letting the beauty of each piece of wood inform what shape I make it into. When I try to force a piece of wood into a preconceived shape it just doesn't seem to have the same natural feel to it. Hard to explain.

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What can I say? He's quite the little man.

I have been doing a linseed oil coat to enhance color and grain, and then CA. For this burl I used a coat of teak oil and sanded it to fill in some pretty big gaps, then a coat of CA which I sanded off before the final finishing.

The CA is my biggest area of learning right now. I'm working on getting it consistently even and glassy smooth. I am going to be trying a thin, watery textured CA next.

Sent from my SM-J700T using Tapatalk
CA can be a pain sometimes. I use it and like the finished product bit don't enjoy the process. I build up thin layers sanding lightly between coats. Many very thin layers seem to work best. Then I sand to 12,000 grit wet micromesh then polish with MAAS metal polish.
 
CA can be a pain sometimes. I use it and like the finished product bit don't enjoy the process. I build up thin layers sanding lightly between coats. Many very thin layers seem to work best. Then I sand to 12,000 grit wet micromesh then polish with MAAS metal polish.
That's exactly what I am going to be trying next, except i have been using rennaissance wax as the polish. I appreciate the validation of the idea!

One of my big obstacles is application of the CA. I have done various things, but a shop towel has been the best result so far. I don't know what that will be like with the very thin CA. I also am working on a mini lathe that does not go slow enough to have it turn the work for me, so I am one handed for CA application. The other hand is turning the lathe by hand. Suggestions or experience here would be much appreciated.

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Suhrim21

Contributor
Thank you! I appreciate all of the comments so far.

I agree with you about the wood. I like acrylic as well and have been very pleased with the acrylic brush I have made, but I love the wood. I have found that my best brushes come from letting the beauty of each piece of wood inform what shape I make it into. When I try to force a piece of wood into a preconceived shape it just doesn't seem to have the same natural feel to it. Hard to explain.

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I understand what you are saying. The natural grain in the wood looks best at certain angles. And that does look amazing. You know if you cant find a home for it I guess I could be convinced to take it. Lol. But seriously great work.
 
That's exactly what I am going to be trying next, except i have been using rennaissance wax as the polish. I appreciate the validation of the idea!

One of my big obstacles is application of the CA. I have done various things, but a shop towel has been the best result so far. I don't know what that will be like with the very thin CA. I also am working on a mini lathe that does not go slow enough to have it turn the work for me, so I am one handed for CA application. The other hand is turning the lathe by hand. Suggestions or experience here would be much appreciated.

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I cut the fingers off of a nitrile glove and put one on my index finger. So 1 glove equals 5 applicators 10 if your careful and can use the clean side the next time. Just a few drops of CA on the "gloved" finger tip and spread it out very thin on the handle. It takes some patience but doing really thin layers and building it up slowly seems to work best for me. Also I kind of hold the finger glove on near the cut end with my thumb and middle finder so it doesn't pull off. I found that shop towels paper towel and stuff like that just soaked up way too much of the glue.
 
You turned some great looking brushes.
I'm not too fond of wood brushes but that maple burl would be awesome to have!
Congratulations on those beautiful brushes.

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