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My First Tobacco Blend

I'm fairly new to pipe smoking. I've smoked on and off in the past but there was no B&B to get advise or ideas from. It has been very helpful to say the least.
It's no big deal but I tried my first blend of 2 tobaccos recently. I mixed Carter Hall and Old Dark Fired. I love it. I just got done doing my 3rd bowl and it is a very nice blend. Are there any unique blends I should try? I like the idea of blending. I don't want to get carried away but would like to try maybe a couple more.
 

ChefJohnBoy-ardee

Contributor
Can always try the tobacco finder at smoking pipes for burley and dark fired leaf. Or just keep trying your mix since you like it.

Someone else should be more helpful.
 

AimlessWanderer

Contributor
I only blend those tobaccos with too much flavour, with those that have too little, to even them out into something smokeable. Dark fired and blends with high Latakia content, need toning down a bit for me to enjoy them. The only other reason I'll combine tobaccos, is if using a bit of plain Virginia shag as tinder to help blends along that are reluctant to burn, such as Gawith ropes.
 
In my acquisitions, I've picked up a couple ounces of blending burley and black cavendish, as well as finding blends that don't do it for me in their own. The blending tobaccos have been good money spent.
 
I won't over do it. I think it will be fun maybe to try a couple more blends.
By all means, keep blending, and have fun! All those master blenders started somewhere. You might become one if you find you really love it.

My only suggestion is to be aware of not only the base leaf families, but the casings and toppings that may be going on in a particular mix. It’s a lot like cooking, matching complementary and opposing ingredients for a distinctive result.

Happy puffs to you!
 
By all means, keep blending, and have fun! All those master blenders started somewhere. You might become one if you find you really love it.

My only suggestion is to be aware of not only the base leaf families, but the casings and toppings that may be going on in a particular mix. It’s a lot like cooking, matching complementary and opposing ingredients for a distinctive result.

Happy puffs to you!
Thanks for the tip. You have been very helpful for me.
 
I blend dark Kentucky into other blends too. Kentucky has a flavor that on its own (for me) is a bit off-putting. But mixed with something, only helps.

As far as steady burning, you can't beat those old codger blends and matches. Bullet proof smoking. As far as unique blends, a found a half flake of Bold Kentucky mixed with Edward G Robinson to be a very good after dinner smoke.
 
I blend dark Kentucky into other blends too. Kentucky has a flavor that on its own (for me) is a bit off-putting. But mixed with something, only helps.

As far as steady burning, you can't beat those old codger blends and matches. Bullet proof smoking. As far as unique blends, a found a half flake of Bold Kentucky mixed with Edward G Robinson to be a very good after dinner smoke.
I've got some Half & Half and some Sir Walter coming. Though I have no intention of wasting the tobacco I already have -- the "mystery" chocolate-maple I've been using, or the Tinder Box VBL. Perhaps I'll try a little mix 'n' match.
 
I've got some Half & Half and some Sir Walter coming. Though I have no intention of wasting the tobacco I already have -- the "mystery" chocolate-maple I've been using, or the Tinder Box VBL. Perhaps I'll try a little mix 'n' match.
No reason at all to waste anything. A little mix and matching is easily the most fun way to improve tobaccos.
 
I have a strong aversion to discarding tobacco. I read a quote by Bismarck, who said:

"The value of tobacco is best understood when it is the last you possess and there is no chance of getting more."
- Otto von Bismarck

I have a desiccated pouch of some no-name "pipe" tobacco, that is clearly so-marked solely that it can be taxed at a lower rate. It is really RYO tobacco that didn't taste too nice in my pipe (and not really good RYO either) that I keep simply because if it were all the tobacco I had, I might be glad I kept it.
 
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