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My First Straight-Help Identify It

I am a DE shaver. I haven't even convinced myself I want to TRY straight shaving, but as I was rummaging through the flee market finds, I ran across a carbon steel SE that begged me to buy it. $20. I thanked him and walked away, razor in pocket. He had no idea what he had or what material it was made out of - a really amateur seller of razors I could tell. I really didn't know what I had and figured I'd check online to find out what this thing is really worth, or at least if it has the potential to be used for shaving one day.

But then, much to my dismay, I've not yet found any reference to it on the entire net. Not even on Straight Razor Place. I figure it's either so worthless it's not even mentionable, or so rare, that practically no one else has one. Meh.

Help?

Here's what it has labeled on the blade:

Hilger & Sons
Remscheid Germany

and on the other side

81
and a stamped 'H' with a flower coming through it.

Any ideas?

Thanks,
Profsaffel
 
It's German.
It's good.
If it is in good shape, send it off for honing, and give it a go.

Pics are going to help a lot.
 
It has quite a bit of hone wear, but it is even, so it should be good(somone obviously liked it enough to keep shaving with it.
Hit it with some Maas/Flitz or other metal polish, have it honed, and go for it.

No clue on it's pedegree, but looks like a keeper to me.:thumbup:
 
Thanks for the response. I certainly want to have it honed and try it out this summer. I'm not sure where to go or have it sent to do it though.

I'm still very curious about its 'pedigree' so if anyone can help with that... :thumbup:
 
ok

Thanks for the response. I certainly want to have it honed and try it out this summer. I'm not sure where to go or have it sent to do it though.
see my response to the same question here http://badgerandblade.com/vb/showpost.php?p=1269386&postcount=3
In my opinion with that hone wear and so much of a narrow blade already gone you may still be better off picking a razor that's already honed and made shave ready. It certainly would've been the better option than buying this one to restore. Just restoring the edge and making it shave ready is worth at least $30. This is not just honing, there is no bevel on this razor so it's restoration teritory.

I'm still very curious about its 'pedigree' so if anyone can help with that... :thumbup:
There are probably hundreds if not thousands of small companies like this. A lot of german history was lost in WW2 too.
 
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Wow, thanks for the response. I really didn't buy it to shave with, so no loss there. I thought I'd try it if it wasn't too much trouble, but buying a new one is probably smarter anyway for my first straight shaver. I suppose it makes a nice convo piece if nothing else. :tongue_sm
 
Wow, thanks for the response. I really didn't buy it to shave with, so no loss there. I thought I'd try it if it wasn't too much trouble, but buying a new one is probably smarter anyway for my first straight shaver. I suppose it makes a nice convo piece if nothing else. :tongue_sm

New or old, does not matter. The important thing is that the razor is honed shave ready.

New razors are not shave ready out of the factory....
 
I found this while looking for info on the hilger & sons razor i just bought on ebay. Mine has hilger & sons germany on one side of the tang and the # 2257 on the other.



"I did not know anything about Hilger & Sons, so I checked my sources and
came up with a few data points. From what I've found, the company was
named after Johann Peter Hilger (1720-1788) and his sons Peter Caspar
Hilger (1747-1803) and Johann Peter Hilger (1752-1816). The first
mention I was able to find (thanks to Google book search) was in a
directory from 1798. You've already found out about the sons, who in
1779 built the house where now the Remscheid tool museum is located.
Hilger & Sons took part in the 1851 London exhibition in a joint venture
with three other Remscheid makers. From this source you can see the
range of tools made by these manufacturers:
http://books.google.com/books?id=2F4YucDjAWcC&pg=PA1085 A German source
about the exhibition lists the tools in more detail and you can see that
dividers ("Zirkel") where among them:
http://books.google.com/books?id=ucNAAAAAcAAJ&pg=PR47

I even found a trademark of Hilger & Sons on a screw box in an ebay
auction some time ago:
http://www.holzwerken.de/pics/hilger_sons_trademark.jpg

And a nice tidbit: One of the files in Duncan Phyfe's toolchest is
marked "Hilger & Sons" (according to the EAIA Chronicle).

I don't know how long this company existed and if Walter Hilger (the
handsaw maker) had anything to do with them."
 
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